A Guide to the Rules on Clubs and Balls

Attachment to Clubhead

Appendix II, 2c requires that:

 The shaft must be attached to the clubhead at the heel either directly or through a single plain neck and/or socket. The length from the top of the neck and/or socket to the sole of the club must not exceed 5 inches (127mm), measured along the axis of, and following any bend in, the neck and/or socket.

Exception for Putters: The shaft or neck or socket of a puttermay be fixed at any point in the head.

The most important points to remember here are that a club must only have one neck and that it must be “plain” and, in order to restrict elaborate shapes and curves, the length of the neck is limited to 5 inches (127mm). 

The interpretation of a “plain” neck has recently been clarified as follows:

All clubs

The neck must not be shaped for any purpose, other than connecting the shaft to the head in a traditional manner. Whilst a neck may contain features such as an adjustability mechanism, a method for damping vibration or an alignment line, it must not be unusually shaped in order to house or accommodate such a feature. For example, in most cases, lines which have been painted or lightly engraved onto an otherwise plain neck are permitted. However, a neck designed specifically to accommodate such lines or marks would be considered non-conforming. Small scale features, on an otherwise plain neck, which are purely for decorative purposes, and could not effectively perform, or be used for, another purpose, may also be permitted.

Woods

The above requirements also apply to woods, however there is some accommodation for the transition area between the head of a wood and its neck. This transition area must fit within a cylinder of a diameter and height of 1 inch (25.4 mm) measured from the base of the transition and parallel to the axis of the shaft. Any transition which satisfies this restriction should be permitted provided it does not contain any other non-plain feature (for example, holes or alignment bars).

NOTE: Some exceptions may be made for clubheads made of wood. Ferrules shaped to circumvent this interpretation are not permitted.

The measurement of the length of a neck should be made in the same way as a bend in the bottom of a shaft (see Section 6 - Straightness and Figure 11).

The majority of necks are designed to have the shaft inserted into them, and this normally avoids any confusion as to where the neck begins. However, if the neck is inserted into the shaft, the measurement should be taken from the end of the shaft.

Figure 12 contains diagrams of various neck features which would not be permitted.

It should be noted that in most cases, lines which have been painted orlightly engraved onto an otherwise plain neck are permitted. However, a neck designed specifically to accommodate such lines or marks would be considered non-conforming.

Fig. 12

 Fig 12a

Fig12c