The R&A - Working for Golf
Putting Greens
Procédures pour les Comités
Aller à la Section
D-1
D-2
D-3
D-4
D-5
D-6
D-7
Explorer plus

Section 8C
Section 8E
8D
Putting Greens
D-1
Clarifying Edge of Putting Green

Purpose. At some courses, the areas around putting greens are maintained in such a manner that it may be difficult for a player to determine if his or her ball is on the putting green. In cases like this the Committee can choose to mark the edges of putting greens with painted dots.

Model Local Rule D-1

"The edges of putting greens are defined by [insert colour] dots. The dots are [on][off] the putting green and free relief is not available from them."

D-2
Status of Putting Green When Temporary Putting Green Is Used

Purpose. There may be times when a putting green for a hole cannot be used for some reason, for example due to bad weather, or for reasons related to repair or maintenance. When this is the case, the Committee may wish to prepare a temporary putting green and put a Local Rule in place to define this as the putting green in play for that hole. The putting green that has been replaced by a temporary putting green should be defined as a wrong green so that players are not permitted to play from it.

Model Local Rule D-2

"Temporary putting greens are in play on holes [insert hole numbers] as defined by [insert description, for example, the areas of fairway surrounded by white lines]. Any putting green that has been replaced by a temporary putting green is a wrong green and free relief for interference must be taken under Rule 13.1f.

Penalty for Playing Ball from a Wrong Place in Breach of Local Rule: General Penalty Under Rule 14.7a."

D-3
Prohibiting Relief from Wrong Green When Only Stance Interference Exists

Purpose. There may be situations where a Committee wishes to deny a player relief from a wrong green when the only interference is to the player's stance, for example:

  • There is thick rough close to some putting greens and the Committee considers that it would be unfair to require a player to take relief into such areas, or
  • One large green is used as the putting green for two separate holes, but the Committee decides to divide the green. It may also choose not to require a player whose ball is on the putting green for the hole being played to take relief when his or her stance is on the other putting green.

Model Local Rule D-3.1

"Rule 13.1f is modified in this way:

Interference does not exist if a wrong green only interferes with the player's stance."

Model Local Rule D-3.2

"Rule 13.1f is modified in this way:

When a player's ball lies on the putting green of [specify hole number], interference does not exist for the player's stance on the putting green of [specify hole number] or the reverse .

Penalty for Playing Ball from a Wrong Place in Breach of Local Rule: General Penalty Under Rule 14.7a."

D-4
Prohibiting Play from Fringe of Wrong Green

Purpose. If balls played on a particular hole often come to rest on the green of a nearby hole:

  • The nearest point of complete relief when taking relief from that wrong green under Rule 13.1f will usually be on the fairway next to that green, and
  • That apron or fringe may become damaged as a result.

To prevent such damage, the Committee can choose to require players to take relief under Rule 13.1f by reference to a modified nearest point of complete relief that avoids interference with both the wrong green and the apron or fringe or by using a dropping zone (see Model Local Rule E-1).

Model Local Rule D-4

"When playing [specify hole number], if the player must take relief under Rule 13.1f because his or her ball came to rest on the putting green of [specify hole number] or that putting green interferes with his or her stance or area of intended swing:

  • In finding the relief area to be used when taking this relief, the putting green of [specify hole number] is defined to include the area of fairway within [specify distance such as two club-lengths] from the edge of the putting green.
  • This means that the nearest point of complete relief must avoid interference from this area in addition to the putting green.

Penalty for Playing Ball from a Wrong Place in Breach of Local Rule: General Penalty Under Rule 14.7a."

D-5
Status of Practice Putting Green or Temporary Putting Green

Purpose. Wrong greens include practice greens for putting or pitching, but the Committee may choose to allow play from them by Local Rule (meaning that a player whose ball lies on such a green must play it from there). A temporary putting green for a hole is typically part of the general area when it is not in use, but the Committee may wish to clarify its status or declare it to be a wrong green. The Committee may also define a practice green or temporary green to be ground under repair which would allow a player to take free relief under Rule 16.1b.

Model Local Rule D-5.1

"The practice green located [insert details of where the green is located] is not a wrong green and free relief is not required or permitted under Rule 13.1f."

Model Local Rule D-5.2

"The temporary green located [insert details of where the green is located] is a wrong green even when not in use and relief must be taken under Rule 13.1f."

Model Local Rule D-5.3

"The practice green located [insert details of where the green is located] is not a wrong green and free relief is not required to be taken under Rule 13.1f, but it is ground under repair and a player may take free relief under Rule 16.1b."

D-6
Dividing a Double Green into Two Separate Greens

Purpose. When a course has a green that serves as the putting green for two holes, the Committee may wish to divide the green into two separate greens through a Local Rule. This would require a player who is on the wrong portion of the green to take relief under Rule 13.1f. The method of defining the separation should be specified. This Local Rule may be used in conjunction with Model Local Rule D-3 for cases where the player's ball is on the correct portion of the green but his or her stance is on the other portion of the green.

Model Local Rule D-6

"The green serving holes [specify hole numbers] is considered to be two separate greens divided by [specify method such as coloured stakes]. A player who has interference with the portion of the green for the hole not being played is on a wrong green and must take relief under Rule 13.1f.

Penalty for Playing Ball from a Wrong Place in Breach of Local Rule: General Penalty Under Rule 14.7a."

D-7
Clarification: Local Rule D-7 Limiting When Stroke Made From Putting Green Must Be Replayed Under Exception 2 to Rule 11.1b

Clarification added: 1/2021

 Model Local Rule D-7

 “Exception 2 to Rule 11.1b applies, except that when a ball played from the putting green accidentally hits: 

  • the player,
  • the club used by the player to make the stroke or
  • an animal defined as a loose impediment (that is, worms, insects and similar animals that can be removed easily)
the stroke counts and the ball must be played as it lies.

Penalty for Playing Ball from a Wrong Place in Breach of Local Rule: General Penalty Under Rule 14.7a.” 

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Mauvais green

Tout green sur le parcours autre que le green du trou joué par le joueur.

Les mauvais greens comprennent :

  • Le green de tous les autres trous que le joueur ne joue pas à ce moment-là,
  • Le green normal d'un trou où un green temporaire est utilisé, et
  • Tous les greens d'entraînement pour le putting ou les approches, à moins que le Comité ne les exclue par une Règle locale.

Les mauvais greens font partie de la zone générale.

Pénalité générale

Perte du trou en match play ou deux coups de pénalité en stroke play.

Mauvais green

Tout green sur le parcours autre que le green du trou joué par le joueur.

Les mauvais greens comprennent :

  • Le green de tous les autres trous que le joueur ne joue pas à ce moment-là,
  • Le green normal d'un trou où un green temporaire est utilisé, et
  • Tous les greens d'entraînement pour le putting ou les approches, à moins que le Comité ne les exclue par une Règle locale.

Les mauvais greens font partie de la zone générale.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Stance

La position des pieds et du corps d'un joueur lorsqu'il se prépare à jouer et joue un coup.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Pénalité générale

Perte du trou en match play ou deux coups de pénalité en stroke play.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Stance

La position des pieds et du corps d'un joueur lorsqu'il se prépare à jouer et joue un coup.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Longueur de club

La longueur du club le plus long parmi les 14 (ou moins) clubs que le joueur possède pendant le tour (comme autorisé par la Règle 4.1b(1)), autre qu'un putter.

Par exemple, si le club le plus long (autre qu'un putter) qu'un joueur possède pendant un tour est un driver de 109,22 cm (43 pouces), une longueur de club est égale à 109,22 cm pour ce joueur et pour ce tour.

Les longueurs de club sont utilisées pour définir la zone de départ du joueur sur chaque trou et pour déterminer la dimension de la zone de dégagement du joueur lorsqu'il se dégage selon une Règle.

 

Interpretation Club-Length/1 - Meaning of “Club-Length“ When Measuring

For the purposes of measuring when determining a relief area, the length of the entire club, starting at the toe of the club and ending at the butt end of the grip is used. However, if the club has a headcover on it or has an attachment to the end of the grip, neither is allowed to be used as part of the club when using it to measure.

Interpretation Club-Length/2 - How to Measure When Longest Club Breaks

If the longest club a player has during a round breaks, that broken club continues to be used for determining the size of his or her relief areas. However, if the longest club breaks and the player is allowed to replace it with another club (Exception to Rule 4.1b(3)) and he or she does so, the broken club is no longer considered his or her longest club.

If the player starts a round with fewer than 14 clubs and decides to add another club that is longer than the clubs he or she started with, the added club is used for measuring so long as it is not a putter.

Clarification -  Signification de “longueur de club“ dans les formules de jeu avec un partenaire

Dans les formules de jeu avec un partenaire, le club le plus long de n’importe quel partenaire autre qu’un putter peut être utilisé pour définir la zone de départ ou déterminer la dimension d’une zone de dégagement.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Point le plus proche de dégagement complet

C'est le point de référence pour se dégager gratuitement d'une condition anormale du parcours (Règle 16.1), d'une situation dangereuse due à un animal (Règle 16.2), d'un mauvais green (Règle 13.1f) ou d'une zone de jeu interdit (Règles 16.1f et 17.1e), ou en se dégageant selon certaines Règles Locales.

C'est le point estimé où reposerait la balle qui est :

  • Le plus près de l'emplacement d'origine de la balle, mais pas plus près du trou que cet emplacement,
  • Dans la zone du parcours requise, et
  • Où la condition n'interfère pas avec le coup que le joueur aurait joué à l'emplacement d'origine de la balle si la condition n'existait pas.

L'estimation de ce point de référence nécessite que le joueur détermine le choix du club, le stance, le swing et la ligne de jeu qu'il aurait utilisés pour ce coup.

Le joueur n'a pas besoin de simuler ce coup en prenant réellement le stance et en exécutant le mouvement avec le club choisi (mais il est recommandé normalement que le joueur le fasse pour faciliter une estimation précise de ce point).

Le point le plus proche de dégagement complet se rapporte uniquement à la condition particulière pour laquelle le dégagement est pris et peut se situer à un endroit où il y a une interférence par quelque chose d'autre :

  • Si le joueur se dégage et que par la suite il a une interférence par une autre condition pour laquelle un dégagement est autorisé, le joueur peut de nouveau se dégager en déterminant un nouveau point le plus proche de dégagement complet pour la nouvelle condition.
  • Le dégagement doit être pris séparément pour chaque condition, sauf que le joueur peut prendre un dégagement des deux conditions en même temps (en déterminant le point le plus proche de dégagement complet des deux conditions) lorsque, ayant déjà pris un dégagement séparément pour chaque condition, il devient raisonnable de conclure que continuer à le faire entraînera une interférence permanente par l'une ou l'autre condition.

 

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/1 - Diagrams Illustrating Nearest Point of Complete Relief

In the diagrams, the term “nearest point of complete relief“ in Rule 16.1 (Abnormal Course Conditions) for relief from interference by ground under repair is illustrated in the case of both a right-handed and a left-handed player.

The nearest point of complete relief must be strictly interpreted. A player is not allowed to choose on which side of the ground under repair the ball will be dropped, unless there are two equidistant nearest points of complete relief. Even if one side of the ground under repair is fairway and the other is bushes, if the nearest point of complete relief is in the bushes, then that is the player's nearest point of complete relief.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/2 – Player Does Not Follow Recommended Procedure in Determining Nearest Point of Complete Relief

Although there is a recommended procedure for determining the nearest point of complete relief, the Rules do not require a player to determine this point when taking relief under a relevant Rule (such as when taking relief from an abnormal course condition under Rule 16.1b (Relief for Ball in General Area)). If a player does not determine a nearest point of complete relief accurately or identifies an incorrect nearest point of complete relief, the player only gets a penalty if this results in him or her dropping a ball into a relief area that does not satisfy the requirements of the Rule and the ball is then played.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/3 – Whether Player Has Taken Relief Incorrectly If Condition Still Interferes for Stroke with Club Not Used to Determine Nearest Point of Complete Relief

When a player is taking relief from an abnormal course condition, he or she is taking relief only for interference that he or she had with the club, stance, swing and line of play that would have been used to play the ball from that spot. After the player has taken relief and there is no longer interference for the stroke the player would have made, any further interference is a new situation.

For example, the player's ball lies in heavy rough in the general area approximately 230 yards from the green. The player selects a wedge to make the next stroke and finds that his or her stance touches a line defining an area of ground under repair. The player determines the nearest point of complete relief and drops a ball in the prescribed relief area according to Rule 14.3b(3) (Ball Must Be Dropped in Relief Area) and Rule 16.1 (Relief from Abnormal Course Conditions).

The ball rolls into a good lie within the relief area from where the player believes that the next stroke could be played with a 3-wood. If the player used a wedge for the next stroke there would be no interference from the ground under repair. However, using the 3-wood, the player again touches the line defining the ground under repair with his or her foot. This is a new situation and the player may play the ball as it lies or take relief for the new situation.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/4 - Player Determines Nearest Point of Complete Relief but Is Physically Unable to Make Intended Stroke

The purpose of determining the nearest point of complete relief is to find a reference point in a location that is as near as possible to where the interfering condition no longer interferes. In determining the nearest point of complete relief, the player is not guaranteed a good or playable lie.

For example, if a player is unable to make a stroke from what appears to be the required relief area as measured from the nearest point of complete relief because either the direction of play is blocked by a tree, or the player is unable to take the backswing for the intended stroke due to a bush, this does not change the fact that the identified point is the nearest point of complete relief.

After the ball is in play, the player must then decide what type of stroke he or she will make. This stroke, which includes the choice of club, may be different than the one that would have been made from the ball's original spot had the condition not been there.

If it is not physically possible to drop the ball in any part of the identified relief area, the player is not allowed relief from the condition.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/5 - Player Physically Unable to Determine Nearest Point of Complete Relief

If a player is physically unable to determine his or her nearest point of complete relief, it must be estimated, and the relief area is then based on the estimated point.

For example, in taking relief under Rule 16.1, a player is physically unable to determine the nearest point of complete relief because that point is within the trunk of a tree or a boundary fence prevents the player from adopting the required stance.

The player must estimate the nearest point of complete relief and drop a ball in the identified relief area.

If it is not physically possible to drop the ball in the identified relief area, the player is not allowed relief under Rule 16.1.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Pénalité générale

Perte du trou en match play ou deux coups de pénalité en stroke play.

Mauvais green

Tout green sur le parcours autre que le green du trou joué par le joueur.

Les mauvais greens comprennent :

  • Le green de tous les autres trous que le joueur ne joue pas à ce moment-là,
  • Le green normal d'un trou où un green temporaire est utilisé, et
  • Tous les greens d'entraînement pour le putting ou les approches, à moins que le Comité ne les exclue par une Règle locale.

Les mauvais greens font partie de la zone générale.

Mauvais green

Tout green sur le parcours autre que le green du trou joué par le joueur.

Les mauvais greens comprennent :

  • Le green de tous les autres trous que le joueur ne joue pas à ce moment-là,
  • Le green normal d'un trou où un green temporaire est utilisé, et
  • Tous les greens d'entraînement pour le putting ou les approches, à moins que le Comité ne les exclue par une Règle locale.

Les mauvais greens font partie de la zone générale.

Mauvais green

Tout green sur le parcours autre que le green du trou joué par le joueur.

Les mauvais greens comprennent :

  • Le green de tous les autres trous que le joueur ne joue pas à ce moment-là,
  • Le green normal d'un trou où un green temporaire est utilisé, et
  • Tous les greens d'entraînement pour le putting ou les approches, à moins que le Comité ne les exclue par une Règle locale.

Les mauvais greens font partie de la zone générale.

Terrain en réparation

Toute partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme étant terrain en réparation (soit en le marquant ou de toute autre façon). Tout terrain en réparation ainsi défini comprend à la fois :

  • Tout le sol à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, et
  • Toute herbe, buisson, arbre ou autre élément naturel, poussant ou fixé, enraciné dans la zone définie, y compris toute partie de ces éléments qui s'étend au dessus du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, mais pas toute partie (par ex. une racine d'arbre) qui est attachée au sol ou en-dessous du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie.

Le terrain en réparation inclut également les choses suivantes même si le Comité ne les définit pas comme tel :

  • Tout trou fait par le Comité ou le personnel d'entretien :
    • En préparant le parcours (par ex. un trou d'où un piquet a été enlevé ou un trou sur un green utilisé pour un autre trou, comme dans le cas d'un green double), ou
    • En entretenant le parcours (par ex. un trou fait en enlevant du gazon ou une souche d'arbre, en posant des canalisations, mais à l'exclusion des trous d'aération).
  • Du gazon coupé, des feuilles et tout autre matériau empilé pour être enlevés ultérieurement. Mais :
    • Tous les matériaux naturels qui sont empilés pour être enlevés, sont également des détritus, et
    • Tous les matériaux laissés sur le parcours et qui ne sont pas destinés à être enlevés ne sont pas terrain en réparation, sauf si le Comité les a définis comme tel.
  • Tout habitat animal (comme un nid d'un oiseau) qui se trouve si près de la balle d'un joueur que le coup ou le stance du joueur pourrait l'endommager, sauf lorsque l'habitat a été créé par des animaux définis comme des détritus (par ex. les vers ou les insectes).

La lisière du terrain en réparation devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par la ligne reliant les points à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur du terrain en réparation.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne de peinture sur le sol, la lisière du terrain en réparation est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans le terrain en réparation.
  • Éléments Physiques : lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (par ex.un parterre de fleurs ou une gazonnière), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière du terrain en réparation.

Lorsque la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par des lignes ou des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe le terrain en réparation, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

 

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/1 - Damage Caused by Committee or Maintenance Staff Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A hole made by maintenance staff is ground under repair even when not marked as ground under repair. However, not all damage caused by maintenance staff is ground under repair by default.

Examples of damage that is not ground under repair by default include:

  • A rut made by a tractor (but the Committee is justified in declaring a deep rut to be ground under repair).
  • An old hole plug that is sunk below the putting green surface, but see Rule 13.1c (Improvements Allowed on Putting Green).

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/2 - Ball in Tree Rooted in Ground Under Repair Is in Ground Under Repair

If a tree is rooted in ground under repair and a player's ball is in a branch of that tree, the ball is in ground under repair even if the branch extends outside the defined area.

If the player decides to take free relief under Rule 16.1 and the spot on the ground directly under where the ball lies in the tree is outside the ground under repair, the reference point for determining the relief area and taking relief is that spot on the ground.

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/3 - Fallen Tree or Tree Stump Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A fallen tree or tree stump that the Committee intends to remove, but is not in the process of being removed, is not automatically ground under repair. However, if the tree and the tree stump are in the process of being unearthed or cut up for later removal, they are “material piled for later removal“ and therefore ground under repair.

For example, a tree that has fallen in the general area and is still attached to the stump is not ground under repair. However, a player could request relief from the Committee and the Committee would be justified in declaring the area covered by the fallen tree to be ground under repair.

Mauvais green

Tout green sur le parcours autre que le green du trou joué par le joueur.

Les mauvais greens comprennent :

  • Le green de tous les autres trous que le joueur ne joue pas à ce moment-là,
  • Le green normal d'un trou où un green temporaire est utilisé, et
  • Tous les greens d'entraînement pour le putting ou les approches, à moins que le Comité ne les exclue par une Règle locale.

Les mauvais greens font partie de la zone générale.

Pénalité générale

Perte du trou en match play ou deux coups de pénalité en stroke play.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Animal

Tout élément vivant du règne animal (autre que les humains), à savoir les mammifères, les oiseaux, les reptiles, les amphibiens et les invertébrés (par ex. les vers, les insectes, les araignées et les crustacés).

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Animal

Tout élément vivant du règne animal (autre que les humains), à savoir les mammifères, les oiseaux, les reptiles, les amphibiens et les invertébrés (par ex. les vers, les insectes, les araignées et les crustacés).

Mauvais endroit

Tout endroit sur le parcours autre que celui où le joueur est requis ou autorisé à jouer sa balle selon les Règles.

Exemples de jeu d'un mauvais endroit :

  • Jouer une balle après l'avoir replacée à un mauvais emplacement, ou sans l'avoir replacée lorsque c'est exigé par les Règles.
  • Jouer une balle droppée reposant à l'extérieur de la zone de dégagement requise.
  • Se dégager selon une Règle inapplicable, la balle étant droppée et jouée d'un endroit non autorisé selon les Règles.
  • Jouer une balle d'une zone de jeu interdit ou lorsqu'une zone de jeu interdit interfère avec la zone du stance ou du swing intentionnels du joueur.

Jouer une balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ en commençant le jeu d'un trou ou en essayant de corriger cette erreur n'est pas jouer d'un mauvais endroit (voir Règle 6.1b).

Pénalité générale

Perte du trou en match play ou deux coups de pénalité en stroke play.