The R&A - Working for Golf
Le jeu, comportement du joueur et les Règles
Aller à la Section
1.2
1.2a
1.2a/1
1.3
1.3b
1.3b(1)/1
1.3b(1)/2
1.3b(2)
1.3c
1.3c(1)/1
1.3c(4)/1
1.3c(4)/2
1.3c(4)/3
1.3c(4)/4
1.3c(4)/C1
1.3c/1
1.3c/2
Explorer plus

Interprétation 3

Objet de la Règle : la Règle 1 présente les principes suivants qui sont fondamentaux pour le joueur :

  • Jouer le parcours comme vous le trouvez et jouer la balle comme elle repose.
  • Jouer selon les règles et dans l'esprit du jeu.
  • Vous êtes responsable de l’application de vos propres pénalités si vous enfreignez une Règle, ceci afin que vous n’en tiriez aucun avantage potentiel vis-à-vis de votre adversaire en match play ou des autres joueurs en stroke play.
1.2
Normes de comportement du joueur
1.2a
Comportement attendu de tous les joueurs
1.2a/1
Meaning of Serious Misconduct

The phrase "serious misconduct" in Rule 1.2a is intended to cover player misconduct that is so far removed from the expected norm in golf that the most severe sanction of removing a player from the competition is justified. This includes dishonesty, deliberately interfering with another player's rights, or endangering the safety of others.

The Committee must determine if the misconduct is serious considering all the circumstances. Even if the Committee determines that the misconduct is serious, it may take the view that it is more appropriate to warn the player that a repeat of the misconduct or similar misconduct will result in disqualification, instead of disqualifying him or her in the first instance.

Examples of actions by a player that are likely to be considered serious misconduct include:

  • Deliberately causing serious damage to a putting green.
  • Disagreeing with the course setup and taking it on himself or herself to move tee-markers or boundary stakes.
  • Throwing a club towards another player or spectator.
  • Deliberately distracting other players while they are making strokes.
  • Removing loose impediments or movable obstructions to disadvantage another player after that other player has asked him or her to leave them in place.
  • Repeatedly refusing to lift a ball at rest when it interferes with another player in stroke play.
  • Deliberately playing away from the hole and then towards the hole to assist the player's partner (such as helping the player's partner learn the break on the putting green).
  • Deliberately not playing in accordance with the Rules and potentially gaining a significant advantage by doing so, despite incurring a penalty for a breach of the relevant Rule.
  • Repeatedly using vulgar or offensive language.
  • Using a handicap that has been established for the purpose of providing an unfair advantage or using the round being played to establish such a handicap.

Examples of actions by a player that, although involving misconduct, are unlikely to be considered serious misconduct include:

  • Slamming a club to the ground, damaging the club and causing minor damage to the turf.
  • Throwing a club towards a golf bag that unintentionally hits another person.
  • Carelessly distracting another player making a stroke.
1.3
Jouer selon les règles
1.3b
Jouer selon les Règles
1.3b(1)/1
Disqualifying Players Who Know a Rule but Deliberately Agree to Ignore it

If two or more players deliberately agree to ignore any Rule or penalty they know applies, they will be disqualified unless the agreement is made before the round and is cancelled before any player involved in the agreement begins his or her round.

For example, in stroke play, two players agree to consider putts within a club-length of the hole holed, when they know that they must hole out on each hole.

While on the first putting green, another player in the group learns of this agreement. That player insists the two players who made the agreement hole out, and they do so.

Even though neither player who made the agreement acted on it by failing to hole out, they are still disqualified because they deliberately agreed to ignore Rule 3.3c (Failure to Hole Out).

1.3b(1)/2
In Order to Agree to Ignore a Rule or Penalty, Players Must Be Aware the Rule Exists

Rule 1.3b(1) does not apply and there is no penalty if players agree to waive a Rule that they are not aware of or fail to apply a penalty that they do not know exists.

Examples where two players are unaware of a Rule, or where they have failed to apply a penalty, and therefore are not disqualified under Rule 1.3b(1), include:

  • In a match, two players agree in advance to concede all putts within a specific length but are unaware that the Rules prohibit them from agreeing to concede putts in this way.
  • Before a 36-hole match, two players agree that they will play only 18 holes and whoever is behind at that point will concede the match, not knowing that this agreement does not comply with the Terms of the Competition.
    The match goes forward on that basis and the player behind after 18 holes concedes the match. Since the players do not know such an agreement is not allowed, the concession stands.
  • In a stroke-play competition, a player and his or her marker, who is also a player, are unsure if the relief area for ground under repair is one club-length or two. Unaware of the Rule, they agree that it is two club-lengths and the player takes relief by dropping a ball almost two club-lengths from the nearest point of complete relief. Later in the round the Committee becomes aware of this.
    Although neither player is disqualified under Rule 1.3b(1) because they were unaware of the Rule, the player has played from a wrong place and gets the penalty under Rule 14.7 (Playing from Wrong Place). There is no penalty for accidentally giving incorrect information on the Rules of Golf.
1.3b(2)
Interpretations Related to Rule 1.3b(2):
  • 6.1/1 – What to Do When One or More Tee-Markers Are Missing
  • 9.6/2 – Where to Replace Ball When It Was Moved from Unknown Location
  • 17.1a/2 – Ball Lost in Either Penalty Area or Abnormal Course Condition Adjacent to Penalty Area
  • 17.1d(3)/2 – Player Drops Ball Based on Estimate of Where the Ball Last Crossed Edge of Penalty Area That Turns Out to Be the Wrong Point
1.3c
Pénalités
1.3c(1)/1
Action of Another Person Breaches a Rule For Player

A player is responsible when another person's action breaches a Rule with respect to the player if it is done at the player's request or if the player sees the action and allows it.

Examples of when a player gets the penalty because he or she requested or allowed the action include:

  • A player asks a spectator to move a loose impediment near his or her ball. If the ball moves the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 9.4b (Penalty for Lifting or Deliberately Touching Ball or Causing It to Move) and ball must be replaced.
  • A player's ball is being searched for in tall grass. A spectator finds the ball and presses the grass down around the ball, improving the conditions affecting the stroke. If the player, seeing that this is about to happen, does not take reasonable steps to try to stop the spectator, he or she gets the general penalty for a breach of Rule 8.1a (Player's Actions That Improve Conditions Affecting the Stroke).
1.3c(4)/1
Intervening Event Between Breaches Results in Multiple Penalties

When a player breaches multiple Rules or the same Rule multiple times, any relationship between the breaches is broken by an intervening event and the player will get multiple penalties.

The three types of intervening events where the player will get multiple penalties are:

  • Making a stroke. Example: In stroke play, a player's ball is near a bush. The player breaks branches and this improves the area of intended swing (a breach of Rule 8.1a). The player makes a stroke, misses the ball, and then breaks more branches (a breach of Rule 8.1a). In this case, the stroke that missed the ball is an intervening event between the two breaches. Therefore, the player gets two separate two-stroke penalties under Rule 8.1a, for four penalty strokes in total.
  • Putting a ball in play. Examples:
    • In stroke play, a player's ball is under a tree. The player breaks tree branches, improving the conditions affecting the stroke, but then decides the ball is unplayable. The player drops a ball within two club-lengths under Rule 19.2c (Unplayable Ball Relief) and then breaks more tree branches. In addition to the one penalty stroke under Rule 19.2, the player gets two separate two-stroke penalties under Rule 8.1a for improving conditions affecting the stroke, for five penalty strokes in total.
    • A player's ball lies in the fairway and he or she accidentally moves the ball at rest. As required by Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player), the player replaces the ball and adds one penalty stroke. Before making a stroke, the player accidentally moves the ball again. The player gets an additional penalty stroke and must again replace the ball, for two penalty strokes in total.
  • Becoming aware of the breach. Example: In stroke play, a player's ball lies in a bunker where the player takes several practice swings each time touching the sand. Another player advises the player that this is a breach of the Rules. The player disagrees and takes several more practice swings, again touching the sand before making a stroke. Correctly informing the player of the breach of the Rules is an intervening event and, therefore, the player gets two separate two-stroke penalties under Rule 12.2b (Restrictions on Touching Sand in Bunker), for four penalty strokes in total.
1.3c(4)/2
Multiple Breaches From a Single Act Result in a Single Penalty

A single act may breach two different Rules. In this situation, one penalty is applied. In the case of two Rules with different penalties, the higher-level penalty will apply.

For example, a player presses down the grass behind his or her ball in play and improves the lie in the rough, accidentally moving the ball as well. This single act (that is, pressing down the grass) breached two Rules, Rule 8.1a (Actions That Improve Conditions Affecting the Stroke) and Rule 9.4b (Lifting or Deliberately Touching Ball or Causing It to Move) and only one penalty applies.

In this case, the penalty under Rule 8.1a is the general penalty and the penalty under Rule 9.4b is one penalty stroke. Therefore, the higher-level penalty applies and the player loses the hole in match play or must add a total penalty of two strokes in stroke play under Rule 8.1a and the ball must be replaced.

1.3c(4)/3
Meaning of Unrelated Acts

Unrelated acts in the context of Rule 1.3c(4) are acts of a player that are of a different type or associated with a different process.

Examples of unrelated acts where multiple penalties apply include:

  • Making a practice swing that touches sand in a bunker and bending an overhanging tree branch that interferes with the player's swing.
  • Moving an immovable obstruction that improves the area of the player's swing and pressing down grass behind the ball.

Examples of related acts where only one penalty applies include:

  • Making several practice swings that touch sand in a bunker.
  • Asking for two different pieces of advice, such as what club the player used and what the wind direction is, both related to the process of selecting what club to use for the next stroke.
1.3c(4)/4
Not Replacing the Ball May Be Considered a Separate and Unrelated Act

In the example given in 1.3c(4)/2, a single act of pressing down grass and moving the ball breached two Rules (Rule 8.1a and Rule 9.4b) and resulted in a single penalty being applied under Rule 8.1a (Actions That Improve Conditions Affecting the Stroke).

However, Rule 9.4b (Lifting or Deliberately Touching Ball or Causing It to Move) requires that the moved ball be replaced and, if it is not replaced before the stroke, the player will get an additional penalty of two strokes under Rule 9.4b. The failure to replace the ball is considered a separate and unrelated act.

1.3c(4)/C1
Clarification: Playing From a Wrong Place Is Related to Causing the Ball to Move:

If a player moves his or her ball in play in breach of Rule 9.4 and plays it from its new location rather than replacing it, the player gets only the general penalty under Rule 14.7 for playing from a wrong place. The act of moving the ball in breach of Rule 9.4 is related to playing from a wrong place in breach of Rule 14.7.

(Clarification added 12/2018)

1.3c/1
Player Is Not Disqualified from a Competition When That Round Does Not Count

In competitions where not all rounds count, a player is not disqualified from the competition for being disqualified from a single round.

Examples of when a player is not disqualified from the competition:

  • In a handicap competition where the two best of four rounds count, a player mistakenly returns his or her scorecard with a higher handicap that affects how many strokes are received in the first round.
    Since the higher handicap affected the number of handicap strokes received, the player is disqualified from the first round of the competition and now has three rounds in which to determine his or her two best net scores.
  • In a team competition with four-player teams, where the three best scores for each round are added up to make the team's score for each round, a player is disqualified from the second round for not correcting the play of a wrong ball. That player's score does not count for the team score in the second round but the player's score would count for any other round of the competition.
1.3c/2
Applying Disqualification Penalties, Concessions and Wrong Number of Strokes in a Stroke-Play Play-Off

During a play-off in a stroke-play competition the Rules are applied as follows:

  • If a player is disqualified (such as for making a stroke with a non-conforming club), the player is disqualified from the play-off only and the player is entitled to any prize that may have been won in the competition itself.
  • If two players are in the play-off, one player is allowed to concede the play-off to the other player.
  • If Player A mistakenly gives the wrong number of strokes to Player B and that mistake results in Player B lifting his or her ball (such as when Player B thinks he or she has lost the play-off to Player A), Player B is allowed to replace the ball without penalty and complete the hole. There is no penalty to Player A.
Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Obstruction amovible

Une obstruction qui peut être déplacée avec un effort raisonnable et sans endommager l'obstruction ou le parcours.

Si une partie d'une obstruction inamovible ou d'un élément partie intégrante (par ex. un portail ou une porte ou une partie d'un câble attaché) répond à ces deux critères, cette partie est traitée comme une obstruction amovible.

Mais ceci ne s'applique pas si la partie mobile d'une obstruction inamovible ou d'un élément partie intégrante n'est pas destinée à être déplacée (par ex. une pierre détachée qui fait partie d'un mur de pierre).

Même si une obstruction est amovible, le Comité peut la définir comme étant une obstruction inamovible.

 

Interpretation Movable Obstruction/1 - Abandoned Ball Is a Movable Obstruction

An abandoned ball is a movable obstruction.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Partenaire

Un joueur qui concourt avec un autre joueur en tant que camp, soit en match play, soit en stroke play.

Partenaire

Un joueur qui concourt avec un autre joueur en tant que camp, soit en match play, soit en stroke play.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Marqueur

En stroke play, la personne ayant la responsabilité d'enregistrer le score d'un joueur sur la carte de score du joueur et de certifier cette carte de score. Le marqueur peut être un autre joueur, mais pas un partenaire.

Le Comité peut désigner qui sera le marqueur du joueur ou dire aux joueurs comment ils peuvent choisir un marqueur.

Zone de dégagement

La zone dans laquelle un joueur doit dropper une balle en se dégageant selon une Règle. Chaque Règle de dégagement exige que le joueur utilise une zone de dégagement spécifique dont la taille et l'emplacement sont basés sur les trois facteurs suivants :

  • Le point de référence : le point à partir duquel la dimension de la zone de dégagement est mesurée.
  • La dimension de la zone de dégagement mesurée à partir du point de référence : la zone de dégagement est soit une, soit deux longueurs de club à partir du point de référence, mais avec certaines limites :
  • Les limites de l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement : l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement peut être limité d'une ou plusieurs façons, de sorte que, par exemple :
    • Cet emplacement ne soit que dans certaines zones du parcours spécifiquement définies, par ex. seulement dans la zone générale, ou pas dans un bunker ni dans une zone à pénalité,
    • Cet emplacement ne soit pas plus près du trou que le point de référence ou qu'il doive être à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité ou d'un bunker d'où le dégagement est pris, ou
    • Cet emplacement se situe à un endroit où il n'y a plus d'interférence (telle que définie dans la Règle particulière) de la condition pour laquelle le dégagement est pris.

En utilisant les longueurs de club pour déterminer la taille d'une zone de dégagement, le joueur peut mesurer directement à travers un fossé, un trou ou un élément similaire, et directement à travers un objet (comme un arbre, une clôture, un mur,un tunnel, un drain ou une tête d'arroseur) mais il n'est pas autorisé à mesurer à travers un sol qui est naturellement en pente montante ou descendante.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 2I (le Comité peut choisir d'autoriser ou d'exiger l'utilisation par le joueur d'une dropping zone en tant que zone de dégagement).


Clarification - Déterminer si la balle repose ou non dans la zone de dégagement.

Lorsqu’on cherche à déterminer si une balle est venue reposer à l’intérieur d’une zone de dégagement (par ex. à une ou deux longueurs de club du point de référence selon la Règle appliquée), la balle est dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle se trouve à l’intérieur de la mesure d’une ou deux longueurs de club. Cependant une balle n’est pas dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle est plus proche du trou que le point de référence ou si la condition à l’origine du dégagement gratuit interfère avec n’importe quelle partie de la balle.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Terrain en réparation

Toute partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme étant terrain en réparation (soit en le marquant ou de toute autre façon). Tout terrain en réparation ainsi défini comprend à la fois :

  • Tout le sol à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, et
  • Toute herbe, buisson, arbre ou autre élément naturel, poussant ou fixé, enraciné dans la zone définie, y compris toute partie de ces éléments qui s'étend au dessus du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, mais pas toute partie (par ex. une racine d'arbre) qui est attachée au sol ou en-dessous du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie.

Le terrain en réparation inclut également les choses suivantes même si le Comité ne les définit pas comme tel :

  • Tout trou fait par le Comité ou le personnel d'entretien :
    • En préparant le parcours (par ex. un trou d'où un piquet a été enlevé ou un trou sur un green utilisé pour un autre trou, comme dans le cas d'un green double), ou
    • En entretenant le parcours (par ex. un trou fait en enlevant du gazon ou une souche d'arbre, en posant des canalisations, mais à l'exclusion des trous d'aération).
  • Du gazon coupé, des feuilles et tout autre matériau empilé pour être enlevés ultérieurement. Mais :
    • Tous les matériaux naturels qui sont empilés pour être enlevés, sont également des détritus, et
    • Tous les matériaux laissés sur le parcours et qui ne sont pas destinés à être enlevés ne sont pas terrain en réparation, sauf si le Comité les a définis comme tel.
  • Tout habitat animal (comme un nid d'un oiseau) qui se trouve si près de la balle d'un joueur que le coup ou le stance du joueur pourrait l'endommager, sauf lorsque l'habitat a été créé par des animaux définis comme des détritus (par ex. les vers ou les insectes).

La lisière du terrain en réparation devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par la ligne reliant les points à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur du terrain en réparation.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne de peinture sur le sol, la lisière du terrain en réparation est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans le terrain en réparation.
  • Éléments Physiques : lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (par ex.un parterre de fleurs ou une gazonnière), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière du terrain en réparation.

Lorsque la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par des lignes ou des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe le terrain en réparation, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

 

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/1 - Damage Caused by Committee or Maintenance Staff Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A hole made by maintenance staff is ground under repair even when not marked as ground under repair. However, not all damage caused by maintenance staff is ground under repair by default.

Examples of damage that is not ground under repair by default include:

  • A rut made by a tractor (but the Committee is justified in declaring a deep rut to be ground under repair).
  • An old hole plug that is sunk below the putting green surface, but see Rule 13.1c (Improvements Allowed on Putting Green).

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/2 - Ball in Tree Rooted in Ground Under Repair Is in Ground Under Repair

If a tree is rooted in ground under repair and a player's ball is in a branch of that tree, the ball is in ground under repair even if the branch extends outside the defined area.

If the player decides to take free relief under Rule 16.1 and the spot on the ground directly under where the ball lies in the tree is outside the ground under repair, the reference point for determining the relief area and taking relief is that spot on the ground.

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/3 - Fallen Tree or Tree Stump Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A fallen tree or tree stump that the Committee intends to remove, but is not in the process of being removed, is not automatically ground under repair. However, if the tree and the tree stump are in the process of being unearthed or cut up for later removal, they are “material piled for later removal“ and therefore ground under repair.

For example, a tree that has fallen in the general area and is still attached to the stump is not ground under repair. However, a player could request relief from the Committee and the Committee would be justified in declaring the area covered by the fallen tree to be ground under repair.

Longueur de club

La longueur du club le plus long parmi les 14 (ou moins) clubs que le joueur possède pendant le tour (comme autorisé par la Règle 4.1b(1)), autre qu'un putter.

Par exemple, si le club le plus long (autre qu'un putter) qu'un joueur possède pendant un tour est un driver de 109,22 cm (43 pouces), une longueur de club est égale à 109,22 cm pour ce joueur et pour ce tour.

Les longueurs de club sont utilisées pour définir la zone de départ du joueur sur chaque trou et pour déterminer la dimension de la zone de dégagement du joueur lorsqu'il se dégage selon une Règle.

 

Interpretation Club-Length/1 - Meaning of “Club-Length“ When Measuring

For the purposes of measuring when determining a relief area, the length of the entire club, starting at the toe of the club and ending at the butt end of the grip is used. However, if the club has a headcover on it or has an attachment to the end of the grip, neither is allowed to be used as part of the club when using it to measure.

Interpretation Club-Length/2 - How to Measure When Longest Club Breaks

If the longest club a player has during a round breaks, that broken club continues to be used for determining the size of his or her relief areas. However, if the longest club breaks and the player is allowed to replace it with another club (Exception to Rule 4.1b(3)) and he or she does so, the broken club is no longer considered his or her longest club.

If the player starts a round with fewer than 14 clubs and decides to add another club that is longer than the clubs he or she started with, the added club is used for measuring so long as it is not a putter.

Clarification -  Signification de “longueur de club“ dans les formules de jeu avec un partenaire

Dans les formules de jeu avec un partenaire, le club le plus long de n’importe quel partenaire autre qu’un putter peut être utilisé pour définir la zone de départ ou déterminer la dimension d’une zone de dégagement.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Longueur de club

La longueur du club le plus long parmi les 14 (ou moins) clubs que le joueur possède pendant le tour (comme autorisé par la Règle 4.1b(1)), autre qu'un putter.

Par exemple, si le club le plus long (autre qu'un putter) qu'un joueur possède pendant un tour est un driver de 109,22 cm (43 pouces), une longueur de club est égale à 109,22 cm pour ce joueur et pour ce tour.

Les longueurs de club sont utilisées pour définir la zone de départ du joueur sur chaque trou et pour déterminer la dimension de la zone de dégagement du joueur lorsqu'il se dégage selon une Règle.

 

Interpretation Club-Length/1 - Meaning of “Club-Length“ When Measuring

For the purposes of measuring when determining a relief area, the length of the entire club, starting at the toe of the club and ending at the butt end of the grip is used. However, if the club has a headcover on it or has an attachment to the end of the grip, neither is allowed to be used as part of the club when using it to measure.

Interpretation Club-Length/2 - How to Measure When Longest Club Breaks

If the longest club a player has during a round breaks, that broken club continues to be used for determining the size of his or her relief areas. However, if the longest club breaks and the player is allowed to replace it with another club (Exception to Rule 4.1b(3)) and he or she does so, the broken club is no longer considered his or her longest club.

If the player starts a round with fewer than 14 clubs and decides to add another club that is longer than the clubs he or she started with, the added club is used for measuring so long as it is not a putter.

Clarification -  Signification de “longueur de club“ dans les formules de jeu avec un partenaire

Dans les formules de jeu avec un partenaire, le club le plus long de n’importe quel partenaire autre qu’un putter peut être utilisé pour définir la zone de départ ou déterminer la dimension d’une zone de dégagement.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Longueur de club

La longueur du club le plus long parmi les 14 (ou moins) clubs que le joueur possède pendant le tour (comme autorisé par la Règle 4.1b(1)), autre qu'un putter.

Par exemple, si le club le plus long (autre qu'un putter) qu'un joueur possède pendant un tour est un driver de 109,22 cm (43 pouces), une longueur de club est égale à 109,22 cm pour ce joueur et pour ce tour.

Les longueurs de club sont utilisées pour définir la zone de départ du joueur sur chaque trou et pour déterminer la dimension de la zone de dégagement du joueur lorsqu'il se dégage selon une Règle.

 

Interpretation Club-Length/1 - Meaning of “Club-Length“ When Measuring

For the purposes of measuring when determining a relief area, the length of the entire club, starting at the toe of the club and ending at the butt end of the grip is used. However, if the club has a headcover on it or has an attachment to the end of the grip, neither is allowed to be used as part of the club when using it to measure.

Interpretation Club-Length/2 - How to Measure When Longest Club Breaks

If the longest club a player has during a round breaks, that broken club continues to be used for determining the size of his or her relief areas. However, if the longest club breaks and the player is allowed to replace it with another club (Exception to Rule 4.1b(3)) and he or she does so, the broken club is no longer considered his or her longest club.

If the player starts a round with fewer than 14 clubs and decides to add another club that is longer than the clubs he or she started with, the added club is used for measuring so long as it is not a putter.

Clarification -  Signification de “longueur de club“ dans les formules de jeu avec un partenaire

Dans les formules de jeu avec un partenaire, le club le plus long de n’importe quel partenaire autre qu’un putter peut être utilisé pour définir la zone de départ ou déterminer la dimension d’une zone de dégagement.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Point le plus proche de dégagement complet

C'est le point de référence pour se dégager gratuitement d'une condition anormale du parcours (Règle 16.1), d'une situation dangereuse due à un animal (Règle 16.2), d'un mauvais green (Règle 13.1f) ou d'une zone de jeu interdit (Règles 16.1f et 17.1e), ou en se dégageant selon certaines Règles Locales.

C'est le point estimé où reposerait la balle qui est :

  • Le plus près de l'emplacement d'origine de la balle, mais pas plus près du trou que cet emplacement,
  • Dans la zone du parcours requise, et
  • Où la condition n'interfère pas avec le coup que le joueur aurait joué à l'emplacement d'origine de la balle si la condition n'existait pas.

L'estimation de ce point de référence nécessite que le joueur détermine le choix du club, le stance, le swing et la ligne de jeu qu'il aurait utilisés pour ce coup.

Le joueur n'a pas besoin de simuler ce coup en prenant réellement le stance et en exécutant le mouvement avec le club choisi (mais il est recommandé normalement que le joueur le fasse pour faciliter une estimation précise de ce point).

Le point le plus proche de dégagement complet se rapporte uniquement à la condition particulière pour laquelle le dégagement est pris et peut se situer à un endroit où il y a une interférence par quelque chose d'autre :

  • Si le joueur se dégage et que par la suite il a une interférence par une autre condition pour laquelle un dégagement est autorisé, le joueur peut de nouveau se dégager en déterminant un nouveau point le plus proche de dégagement complet pour la nouvelle condition.
  • Le dégagement doit être pris séparément pour chaque condition, sauf que le joueur peut prendre un dégagement des deux conditions en même temps (en déterminant le point le plus proche de dégagement complet des deux conditions) lorsque, ayant déjà pris un dégagement séparément pour chaque condition, il devient raisonnable de conclure que continuer à le faire entraînera une interférence permanente par l'une ou l'autre condition.

 

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/1 - Diagrams Illustrating Nearest Point of Complete Relief

In the diagrams, the term “nearest point of complete relief“ in Rule 16.1 (Abnormal Course Conditions) for relief from interference by ground under repair is illustrated in the case of both a right-handed and a left-handed player.

The nearest point of complete relief must be strictly interpreted. A player is not allowed to choose on which side of the ground under repair the ball will be dropped, unless there are two equidistant nearest points of complete relief. Even if one side of the ground under repair is fairway and the other is bushes, if the nearest point of complete relief is in the bushes, then that is the player's nearest point of complete relief.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/2 – Player Does Not Follow Recommended Procedure in Determining Nearest Point of Complete Relief

Although there is a recommended procedure for determining the nearest point of complete relief, the Rules do not require a player to determine this point when taking relief under a relevant Rule (such as when taking relief from an abnormal course condition under Rule 16.1b (Relief for Ball in General Area)). If a player does not determine a nearest point of complete relief accurately or identifies an incorrect nearest point of complete relief, the player only gets a penalty if this results in him or her dropping a ball into a relief area that does not satisfy the requirements of the Rule and the ball is then played.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/3 – Whether Player Has Taken Relief Incorrectly If Condition Still Interferes for Stroke with Club Not Used to Determine Nearest Point of Complete Relief

When a player is taking relief from an abnormal course condition, he or she is taking relief only for interference that he or she had with the club, stance, swing and line of play that would have been used to play the ball from that spot. After the player has taken relief and there is no longer interference for the stroke the player would have made, any further interference is a new situation.

For example, the player's ball lies in heavy rough in the general area approximately 230 yards from the green. The player selects a wedge to make the next stroke and finds that his or her stance touches a line defining an area of ground under repair. The player determines the nearest point of complete relief and drops a ball in the prescribed relief area according to Rule 14.3b(3) (Ball Must Be Dropped in Relief Area) and Rule 16.1 (Relief from Abnormal Course Conditions).

The ball rolls into a good lie within the relief area from where the player believes that the next stroke could be played with a 3-wood. If the player used a wedge for the next stroke there would be no interference from the ground under repair. However, using the 3-wood, the player again touches the line defining the ground under repair with his or her foot. This is a new situation and the player may play the ball as it lies or take relief for the new situation.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/4 - Player Determines Nearest Point of Complete Relief but Is Physically Unable to Make Intended Stroke

The purpose of determining the nearest point of complete relief is to find a reference point in a location that is as near as possible to where the interfering condition no longer interferes. In determining the nearest point of complete relief, the player is not guaranteed a good or playable lie.

For example, if a player is unable to make a stroke from what appears to be the required relief area as measured from the nearest point of complete relief because either the direction of play is blocked by a tree, or the player is unable to take the backswing for the intended stroke due to a bush, this does not change the fact that the identified point is the nearest point of complete relief.

After the ball is in play, the player must then decide what type of stroke he or she will make. This stroke, which includes the choice of club, may be different than the one that would have been made from the ball's original spot had the condition not been there.

If it is not physically possible to drop the ball in any part of the identified relief area, the player is not allowed relief from the condition.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/5 - Player Physically Unable to Determine Nearest Point of Complete Relief

If a player is physically unable to determine his or her nearest point of complete relief, it must be estimated, and the relief area is then based on the estimated point.

For example, in taking relief under Rule 16.1, a player is physically unable to determine the nearest point of complete relief because that point is within the trunk of a tree or a boundary fence prevents the player from adopting the required stance.

The player must estimate the nearest point of complete relief and drop a ball in the identified relief area.

If it is not physically possible to drop the ball in the identified relief area, the player is not allowed relief under Rule 16.1.

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Mauvais endroit

Tout endroit sur le parcours autre que celui où le joueur est requis ou autorisé à jouer sa balle selon les Règles.

Exemples de jeu d'un mauvais endroit :

  • Jouer une balle après l'avoir replacée à un mauvais emplacement, ou sans l'avoir replacée lorsque c'est exigé par les Règles.
  • Jouer une balle droppée reposant à l'extérieur de la zone de dégagement requise.
  • Se dégager selon une Règle inapplicable, la balle étant droppée et jouée d'un endroit non autorisé selon les Règles.
  • Jouer une balle d'une zone de jeu interdit ou lorsqu'une zone de jeu interdit interfère avec la zone du stance ou du swing intentionnels du joueur.

Jouer une balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ en commençant le jeu d'un trou ou en essayant de corriger cette erreur n'est pas jouer d'un mauvais endroit (voir Règle 6.1b).

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Déplacée (balle)

Quand une balle au repos a quitté son emplacement d'origine et vient reposer à n'importe quel autre endroit, et que cela peut être vu à l'œil nu (peu importe que quelqu'un ait vu effectivement ou non ce déplacement).

Ceci s'applique que la balle se soit éloignée de son emplacement d'origine vers le haut, vers le bas ou horizontalement dans n'importe quelle direction.

Si la balle oscille seulement et reste sur ou revient à son emplacement d'origine, la balle ne s'est pas déplacée.

 

Interpretation Moved/1 - When Ball Resting on Object Has Moved

For the purpose of deciding whether a ball must be replaced or whether a player gets a penalty, a ball is treated as having moved only if it has moved in relation to a specific part of the larger condition or object it is resting on, unless the entire object the ball is resting on has moved in relation to the ground.

An example of when a ball has not moved includes when:

  • A ball is resting in the fork of a tree branch and the tree branch moves, but the ball's spot in the branch does not change.

Examples of when a ball has moved include when:

  • A ball is resting in a stationary plastic cup and the cup itself moves in relation to the ground because it is being blown by the wind.
  • A ball is resting in or on a stationary motorized cart that starts to move.

Interpretation Moved/2 - Television Evidence Shows Ball at Rest Changed Position but by Amount Not Reasonably Discernible to Naked Eye

When determining whether or not a ball at rest has moved, a player must make that judgment based on all the information reasonably available to him or her at the time, so that he or she can determine whether the ball must be replaced under the Rules. When the player's ball has left its original position and come to rest in another place by an amount that was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, a player's determination that the ball has not moved is conclusive, even if that determination is later shown to be incorrect through the use of sophisticated technology.

On the other hand, if the Committee determines, based on all of the evidence it has available, that the ball changed its position by an amount that was reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, the ball will be determined to have moved even though no-one actually saw it move.

Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Améliorer

Modifier une ou plusieurs des conditions affectant le coup ou d'autres conditions physiques affectant le jeu de telle sorte que le joueur en tire un avantage potentiel pour le coup.

Conditions affectant le coup

Le lie de la balle au repos du joueur, la zone de son stance intentionnel, la zone de son swing intentionnel, sa ligne de jeu et la zone de dégagement dans laquelle le joueur va dropper ou placer une balle.

  •  La “zone du stance intentionnel“ comprend à la fois l'endroit où le joueur placera ses pieds et toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la manière et l'endroit où le corps du joueur est positionné pour la préparation et le jeu du coup prévu.
  • La “zone du swing intentionnel“ comprend toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la montée ou la descente du club ou la fin du swing pour le coup prévu.
  • Chacun des termes lie, ligne de jeu et zone de dégagement possède sa propre définition.
Pénalité générale

Perte du trou en match play ou deux coups de pénalité en stroke play.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Améliorer

Modifier une ou plusieurs des conditions affectant le coup ou d'autres conditions physiques affectant le jeu de telle sorte que le joueur en tire un avantage potentiel pour le coup.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Améliorer

Modifier une ou plusieurs des conditions affectant le coup ou d'autres conditions physiques affectant le jeu de telle sorte que le joueur en tire un avantage potentiel pour le coup.

Conditions affectant le coup

Le lie de la balle au repos du joueur, la zone de son stance intentionnel, la zone de son swing intentionnel, sa ligne de jeu et la zone de dégagement dans laquelle le joueur va dropper ou placer une balle.

  •  La “zone du stance intentionnel“ comprend à la fois l'endroit où le joueur placera ses pieds et toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la manière et l'endroit où le corps du joueur est positionné pour la préparation et le jeu du coup prévu.
  • La “zone du swing intentionnel“ comprend toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la montée ou la descente du club ou la fin du swing pour le coup prévu.
  • Chacun des termes lie, ligne de jeu et zone de dégagement possède sa propre définition.
Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Longueur de club

La longueur du club le plus long parmi les 14 (ou moins) clubs que le joueur possède pendant le tour (comme autorisé par la Règle 4.1b(1)), autre qu'un putter.

Par exemple, si le club le plus long (autre qu'un putter) qu'un joueur possède pendant un tour est un driver de 109,22 cm (43 pouces), une longueur de club est égale à 109,22 cm pour ce joueur et pour ce tour.

Les longueurs de club sont utilisées pour définir la zone de départ du joueur sur chaque trou et pour déterminer la dimension de la zone de dégagement du joueur lorsqu'il se dégage selon une Règle.

 

Interpretation Club-Length/1 - Meaning of “Club-Length“ When Measuring

For the purposes of measuring when determining a relief area, the length of the entire club, starting at the toe of the club and ending at the butt end of the grip is used. However, if the club has a headcover on it or has an attachment to the end of the grip, neither is allowed to be used as part of the club when using it to measure.

Interpretation Club-Length/2 - How to Measure When Longest Club Breaks

If the longest club a player has during a round breaks, that broken club continues to be used for determining the size of his or her relief areas. However, if the longest club breaks and the player is allowed to replace it with another club (Exception to Rule 4.1b(3)) and he or she does so, the broken club is no longer considered his or her longest club.

If the player starts a round with fewer than 14 clubs and decides to add another club that is longer than the clubs he or she started with, the added club is used for measuring so long as it is not a putter.

Clarification -  Signification de “longueur de club“ dans les formules de jeu avec un partenaire

Dans les formules de jeu avec un partenaire, le club le plus long de n’importe quel partenaire autre qu’un putter peut être utilisé pour définir la zone de départ ou déterminer la dimension d’une zone de dégagement.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Améliorer

Modifier une ou plusieurs des conditions affectant le coup ou d'autres conditions physiques affectant le jeu de telle sorte que le joueur en tire un avantage potentiel pour le coup.

Conditions affectant le coup

Le lie de la balle au repos du joueur, la zone de son stance intentionnel, la zone de son swing intentionnel, sa ligne de jeu et la zone de dégagement dans laquelle le joueur va dropper ou placer une balle.

  •  La “zone du stance intentionnel“ comprend à la fois l'endroit où le joueur placera ses pieds et toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la manière et l'endroit où le corps du joueur est positionné pour la préparation et le jeu du coup prévu.
  • La “zone du swing intentionnel“ comprend toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la montée ou la descente du club ou la fin du swing pour le coup prévu.
  • Chacun des termes lie, ligne de jeu et zone de dégagement possède sa propre définition.
Déplacée (balle)

Quand une balle au repos a quitté son emplacement d'origine et vient reposer à n'importe quel autre endroit, et que cela peut être vu à l'œil nu (peu importe que quelqu'un ait vu effectivement ou non ce déplacement).

Ceci s'applique que la balle se soit éloignée de son emplacement d'origine vers le haut, vers le bas ou horizontalement dans n'importe quelle direction.

Si la balle oscille seulement et reste sur ou revient à son emplacement d'origine, la balle ne s'est pas déplacée.

 

Interpretation Moved/1 - When Ball Resting on Object Has Moved

For the purpose of deciding whether a ball must be replaced or whether a player gets a penalty, a ball is treated as having moved only if it has moved in relation to a specific part of the larger condition or object it is resting on, unless the entire object the ball is resting on has moved in relation to the ground.

An example of when a ball has not moved includes when:

  • A ball is resting in the fork of a tree branch and the tree branch moves, but the ball's spot in the branch does not change.

Examples of when a ball has moved include when:

  • A ball is resting in a stationary plastic cup and the cup itself moves in relation to the ground because it is being blown by the wind.
  • A ball is resting in or on a stationary motorized cart that starts to move.

Interpretation Moved/2 - Television Evidence Shows Ball at Rest Changed Position but by Amount Not Reasonably Discernible to Naked Eye

When determining whether or not a ball at rest has moved, a player must make that judgment based on all the information reasonably available to him or her at the time, so that he or she can determine whether the ball must be replaced under the Rules. When the player's ball has left its original position and come to rest in another place by an amount that was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, a player's determination that the ball has not moved is conclusive, even if that determination is later shown to be incorrect through the use of sophisticated technology.

On the other hand, if the Committee determines, based on all of the evidence it has available, that the ball changed its position by an amount that was reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, the ball will be determined to have moved even though no-one actually saw it move.

Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Déplacée (balle)

Quand une balle au repos a quitté son emplacement d'origine et vient reposer à n'importe quel autre endroit, et que cela peut être vu à l'œil nu (peu importe que quelqu'un ait vu effectivement ou non ce déplacement).

Ceci s'applique que la balle se soit éloignée de son emplacement d'origine vers le haut, vers le bas ou horizontalement dans n'importe quelle direction.

Si la balle oscille seulement et reste sur ou revient à son emplacement d'origine, la balle ne s'est pas déplacée.

 

Interpretation Moved/1 - When Ball Resting on Object Has Moved

For the purpose of deciding whether a ball must be replaced or whether a player gets a penalty, a ball is treated as having moved only if it has moved in relation to a specific part of the larger condition or object it is resting on, unless the entire object the ball is resting on has moved in relation to the ground.

An example of when a ball has not moved includes when:

  • A ball is resting in the fork of a tree branch and the tree branch moves, but the ball's spot in the branch does not change.

Examples of when a ball has moved include when:

  • A ball is resting in a stationary plastic cup and the cup itself moves in relation to the ground because it is being blown by the wind.
  • A ball is resting in or on a stationary motorized cart that starts to move.

Interpretation Moved/2 - Television Evidence Shows Ball at Rest Changed Position but by Amount Not Reasonably Discernible to Naked Eye

When determining whether or not a ball at rest has moved, a player must make that judgment based on all the information reasonably available to him or her at the time, so that he or she can determine whether the ball must be replaced under the Rules. When the player's ball has left its original position and come to rest in another place by an amount that was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, a player's determination that the ball has not moved is conclusive, even if that determination is later shown to be incorrect through the use of sophisticated technology.

On the other hand, if the Committee determines, based on all of the evidence it has available, that the ball changed its position by an amount that was reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, the ball will be determined to have moved even though no-one actually saw it move.

Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Bunker

Une zone de sable spécialement préparée, qui est souvent un creux d'où le gazon ou la terre ont été enlevés.

Ne font pas partie d'un bunker :

  • Une lèvre, un mur ou une face, en lisière de la zone préparée, constitués de terre, d'herbe, de mottes de gazon empilées ou de matériaux artificiels,
  • La terre ou tout élément naturel qui pousse ou est fixé à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée (par ex. de l'herbe, des buissons ou des arbres),
  • Du sable qui a débordé ou qui se trouve à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée, et
  • Toutes les autres zones de sable sur le parcours qui ne sont pas à l'intérieur de la lisière d'une zone préparée (comme les déserts et autres zones de sable naturelles ou des zones parfois appelées “waste areas“).

Les bunkers sont l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Un Comité peut définir une zone de sable préparée comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker) ou une zone de sable non préparée comme un bunker.

Quand un bunker est en réparation, le Comité peut définir la totalité du bunker comme un terrain en réparation. Il est alors traité comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker).

Le mot “sable“ utilisé dans cette Définition et dans la Règle 12 comprend tout matériau semblable au sable utilisé comme matériau de bunker (comme les coquillages broyés), ainsi que toute terre mélangée au sable.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Améliorer

Modifier une ou plusieurs des conditions affectant le coup ou d'autres conditions physiques affectant le jeu de telle sorte que le joueur en tire un avantage potentiel pour le coup.

Lie

L'emplacement où une balle est au repos et tout élément naturel poussant ou fixé,toute obstruction inamovible, tout élément partie intégrante, ou tout élément de limites touchant la balle ou juste à côté.

Les détritus et les obstructions amovibles ne font pas partie du lie d'une balle.

Déplacée (balle)

Quand une balle au repos a quitté son emplacement d'origine et vient reposer à n'importe quel autre endroit, et que cela peut être vu à l'œil nu (peu importe que quelqu'un ait vu effectivement ou non ce déplacement).

Ceci s'applique que la balle se soit éloignée de son emplacement d'origine vers le haut, vers le bas ou horizontalement dans n'importe quelle direction.

Si la balle oscille seulement et reste sur ou revient à son emplacement d'origine, la balle ne s'est pas déplacée.

 

Interpretation Moved/1 - When Ball Resting on Object Has Moved

For the purpose of deciding whether a ball must be replaced or whether a player gets a penalty, a ball is treated as having moved only if it has moved in relation to a specific part of the larger condition or object it is resting on, unless the entire object the ball is resting on has moved in relation to the ground.

An example of when a ball has not moved includes when:

  • A ball is resting in the fork of a tree branch and the tree branch moves, but the ball's spot in the branch does not change.

Examples of when a ball has moved include when:

  • A ball is resting in a stationary plastic cup and the cup itself moves in relation to the ground because it is being blown by the wind.
  • A ball is resting in or on a stationary motorized cart that starts to move.

Interpretation Moved/2 - Television Evidence Shows Ball at Rest Changed Position but by Amount Not Reasonably Discernible to Naked Eye

When determining whether or not a ball at rest has moved, a player must make that judgment based on all the information reasonably available to him or her at the time, so that he or she can determine whether the ball must be replaced under the Rules. When the player's ball has left its original position and come to rest in another place by an amount that was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, a player's determination that the ball has not moved is conclusive, even if that determination is later shown to be incorrect through the use of sophisticated technology.

On the other hand, if the Committee determines, based on all of the evidence it has available, that the ball changed its position by an amount that was reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, the ball will be determined to have moved even though no-one actually saw it move.

Pénalité générale

Perte du trou en match play ou deux coups de pénalité en stroke play.

Match Play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp joue directement contre un adversaire ou un camp adverse dans un match en tête-à-tête, sur un ou plusieurs tours :

  • Un joueur ou un camp gagne un trou dans le match en finissant le trou avec le plus petit nombre de coups (à savoir les coups joués et les coups de pénalité), et
  • Le match est gagné lorsqu'un joueur ou un camp mène l'adversaire ou le camp adverse par plus de trous qu'il n'en reste à jouer.

Un match play peut être joué comme un match en simple (dans lequel un joueur joue directement contre un adversaire), un match à Trois balles ou bien un match en Foursome ou à Quatre balles entre des camps de deux partenaires.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Bunker

Une zone de sable spécialement préparée, qui est souvent un creux d'où le gazon ou la terre ont été enlevés.

Ne font pas partie d'un bunker :

  • Une lèvre, un mur ou une face, en lisière de la zone préparée, constitués de terre, d'herbe, de mottes de gazon empilées ou de matériaux artificiels,
  • La terre ou tout élément naturel qui pousse ou est fixé à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée (par ex. de l'herbe, des buissons ou des arbres),
  • Du sable qui a débordé ou qui se trouve à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée, et
  • Toutes les autres zones de sable sur le parcours qui ne sont pas à l'intérieur de la lisière d'une zone préparée (comme les déserts et autres zones de sable naturelles ou des zones parfois appelées “waste areas“).

Les bunkers sont l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Un Comité peut définir une zone de sable préparée comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker) ou une zone de sable non préparée comme un bunker.

Quand un bunker est en réparation, le Comité peut définir la totalité du bunker comme un terrain en réparation. Il est alors traité comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker).

Le mot “sable“ utilisé dans cette Définition et dans la Règle 12 comprend tout matériau semblable au sable utilisé comme matériau de bunker (comme les coquillages broyés), ainsi que toute terre mélangée au sable.

Obstruction inamovible

Toute obstruction qui :

  • Ne peut pas être déplacée sans effort déraisonnable ou sans endommager l'obstruction ou le parcours, et
  • Sinon, ne correspond pas à la définition d'une obstruction amovible.

Le Comité peut définir toute obstruction comme une obstruction inamovible même si elle correspond à la définition d'une obstruction amovible

 

Interpretation Immovable Obstruction/1 - Turf Around Obstruction Is Not Part of Obstruction

Any turf that is leading to an immovable obstruction or covering an immovable obstruction, is not part of the obstruction.

For example, a water pipe is partly underground and partly above ground. If the pipe that is underground causes the turf to be raised, the raised turf is not part of the immovable obstruction.

Améliorer

Modifier une ou plusieurs des conditions affectant le coup ou d'autres conditions physiques affectant le jeu de telle sorte que le joueur en tire un avantage potentiel pour le coup.

Bunker

Une zone de sable spécialement préparée, qui est souvent un creux d'où le gazon ou la terre ont été enlevés.

Ne font pas partie d'un bunker :

  • Une lèvre, un mur ou une face, en lisière de la zone préparée, constitués de terre, d'herbe, de mottes de gazon empilées ou de matériaux artificiels,
  • La terre ou tout élément naturel qui pousse ou est fixé à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée (par ex. de l'herbe, des buissons ou des arbres),
  • Du sable qui a débordé ou qui se trouve à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée, et
  • Toutes les autres zones de sable sur le parcours qui ne sont pas à l'intérieur de la lisière d'une zone préparée (comme les déserts et autres zones de sable naturelles ou des zones parfois appelées “waste areas“).

Les bunkers sont l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Un Comité peut définir une zone de sable préparée comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker) ou une zone de sable non préparée comme un bunker.

Quand un bunker est en réparation, le Comité peut définir la totalité du bunker comme un terrain en réparation. Il est alors traité comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker).

Le mot “sable“ utilisé dans cette Définition et dans la Règle 12 comprend tout matériau semblable au sable utilisé comme matériau de bunker (comme les coquillages broyés), ainsi que toute terre mélangée au sable.

Conseil

Tout commentaire verbal ou action (par ex. montrer quel club vient d'être utilisé pour jouer un coup) qui est destiné à influencer un joueur dans :

  • Le choix d'un club,
  • Jouer un coup, ou
  • La manière de jouer pendant un trou ou un tour.

Mais un conseil n'inclut pas des faits notoirement connus, par ex. :

  • La position d'éléments sur le parcours tel que le trou, le green, le fairway, les zones à pénalité, les bunkers, ou la balle d'un autre joueur.
  • La distance d'un point à un autre point, ou
  • Les Règles.

 

Interpretation Advice/1 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Advice

Examples of when comments or actions are considered advice and are not allowed include:

  • A player makes a statement regarding club selection that was intended to be overheard by another player who had a similar stroke.
  • In individual stroke play, Player A, who has just holed out on the 7th hole, demonstrates to Player B, whose ball was just off the putting green, how to make the next stroke. Because Player B has not completed the hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 7th hole. But, if both Player A and Player B had completed the 7th hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 8th hole.
  • A player's ball is lying badly and the player is deliberating what action to take. Another player comments, “You have no shot at all. If I were you, I would decide to take unplayable ball relief.“ This comment is advice because it could have influenced the player in deciding how to play during a hole.
  • While a player is setting up to hit his or her shot over a large penalty area filled with water, another player in the group comments, “You know the wind is in your face and it's 250 yards to carry that water?“

Interpretation Advice/2 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Not Advice

Examples of comments or actions that are not advice include:

  • During play of the 6th hole, a player asks another player what club he or she used on the 4th hole that is a par-3 of similar length.
  • A player makes a second stroke that lands on the putting green. Another player does likewise. The first player then asks the second player what club was used for the second stroke.
  • After making a stroke, a player says, “I should have used a 5-iron“ to another player in the group that has yet to play onto the green, but not intending to influence his or her play.
  • A player looks into another player's bag to determine which club he or she used for the last stroke without touching or moving anything.
  • While lining up a putt, a player mistakenly seeks advice from another player's caddie, believing that caddie to be the player's caddie. The player immediately realizes the mistake and tells the other caddie not to answer.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Déplacée (balle)

Quand une balle au repos a quitté son emplacement d'origine et vient reposer à n'importe quel autre endroit, et que cela peut être vu à l'œil nu (peu importe que quelqu'un ait vu effectivement ou non ce déplacement).

Ceci s'applique que la balle se soit éloignée de son emplacement d'origine vers le haut, vers le bas ou horizontalement dans n'importe quelle direction.

Si la balle oscille seulement et reste sur ou revient à son emplacement d'origine, la balle ne s'est pas déplacée.

 

Interpretation Moved/1 - When Ball Resting on Object Has Moved

For the purpose of deciding whether a ball must be replaced or whether a player gets a penalty, a ball is treated as having moved only if it has moved in relation to a specific part of the larger condition or object it is resting on, unless the entire object the ball is resting on has moved in relation to the ground.

An example of when a ball has not moved includes when:

  • A ball is resting in the fork of a tree branch and the tree branch moves, but the ball's spot in the branch does not change.

Examples of when a ball has moved include when:

  • A ball is resting in a stationary plastic cup and the cup itself moves in relation to the ground because it is being blown by the wind.
  • A ball is resting in or on a stationary motorized cart that starts to move.

Interpretation Moved/2 - Television Evidence Shows Ball at Rest Changed Position but by Amount Not Reasonably Discernible to Naked Eye

When determining whether or not a ball at rest has moved, a player must make that judgment based on all the information reasonably available to him or her at the time, so that he or she can determine whether the ball must be replaced under the Rules. When the player's ball has left its original position and come to rest in another place by an amount that was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, a player's determination that the ball has not moved is conclusive, even if that determination is later shown to be incorrect through the use of sophisticated technology.

On the other hand, if the Committee determines, based on all of the evidence it has available, that the ball changed its position by an amount that was reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, the ball will be determined to have moved even though no-one actually saw it move.

Déplacée (balle)

Quand une balle au repos a quitté son emplacement d'origine et vient reposer à n'importe quel autre endroit, et que cela peut être vu à l'œil nu (peu importe que quelqu'un ait vu effectivement ou non ce déplacement).

Ceci s'applique que la balle se soit éloignée de son emplacement d'origine vers le haut, vers le bas ou horizontalement dans n'importe quelle direction.

Si la balle oscille seulement et reste sur ou revient à son emplacement d'origine, la balle ne s'est pas déplacée.

 

Interpretation Moved/1 - When Ball Resting on Object Has Moved

For the purpose of deciding whether a ball must be replaced or whether a player gets a penalty, a ball is treated as having moved only if it has moved in relation to a specific part of the larger condition or object it is resting on, unless the entire object the ball is resting on has moved in relation to the ground.

An example of when a ball has not moved includes when:

  • A ball is resting in the fork of a tree branch and the tree branch moves, but the ball's spot in the branch does not change.

Examples of when a ball has moved include when:

  • A ball is resting in a stationary plastic cup and the cup itself moves in relation to the ground because it is being blown by the wind.
  • A ball is resting in or on a stationary motorized cart that starts to move.

Interpretation Moved/2 - Television Evidence Shows Ball at Rest Changed Position but by Amount Not Reasonably Discernible to Naked Eye

When determining whether or not a ball at rest has moved, a player must make that judgment based on all the information reasonably available to him or her at the time, so that he or she can determine whether the ball must be replaced under the Rules. When the player's ball has left its original position and come to rest in another place by an amount that was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, a player's determination that the ball has not moved is conclusive, even if that determination is later shown to be incorrect through the use of sophisticated technology.

On the other hand, if the Committee determines, based on all of the evidence it has available, that the ball changed its position by an amount that was reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, the ball will be determined to have moved even though no-one actually saw it move.

Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Carte de score

Document sur lequel le score d'un joueur sur chaque trou est enregistré en stroke play.

La carte de score peut se présenter sous n'importe quelle forme approuvée par le Comité, papier ou électronique, permettant :

  • D'enregistrer le score du joueur pour chaque trou,
  • D'enregistrer le handicap du joueur, s'il s'agit d'une compétition avec handicap, et
  • Au marqueur et au joueur de certifier les scores, et au joueur de certifier son handicap dans une compétition avec handicap, soit par signature physique, soit par une méthode de certification électronique approuvée par le Comité.

Une carte de score n'est pas exigée en match play mais peut être utilisée par les joueurs pour aider à tenir à jour le score du match.

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Mauvaise balle

Toute balle autre que :

  • La balle en jeu du joueur (que ce soit la balle d'origine ou une balle substituée),
  • La balle provisoire du joueur (avant qu'elle ne soit abandonnée selon la Règle 18.3c), ou
  • En stroke play, votre seconde balle jouée selon les Règles 14.7b ou 20.1c.

Exemples d'une mauvaise balle :

  • La balle en jeu d'un autre joueur.
  • Une balle abandonnée.
  • La propre balle du joueur qui est hors limites, qui est devenue perdue ou qui a été relevée et pas encore remise en jeu.

 

Interpretation Wrong Ball/1 - Part of Wrong Ball Is Still Wrong Ball

If a player makes a stroke at part of a stray ball that he or she mistakenly thought was the ball in play, he or she has made a stroke at a wrong ball and Rule 6.3c applies.

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.