The R&A - Working for Golf
Préparation et jeu d'un coup ; conseil et aide ; cadets
Aller à la Section
10.1
10.1a
10.1a/1
10.1a/2
10.1a/3
10.1b
10.1b/1
10.1b/2
10.1b/3
10.2
10.2a
10.2a/1
10.2a/2
10.2b
10.2b(3)/1
10.2b(4)/1
10.2b(4)/C1
10.2b(4)/C2
10.2b(4)/C3
10.2b(5)/1
10.2b(5)/2
10.3
10.3a
10.3a/1
10.3a/2
10.3b
10.3b(2)/C1

Objet de la Règle : La Règle 10 traite de comment préparer et jouer un coup, y compris les conseils et aides diverses que le joueur peut obtenir des autres (y compris des cadets). Le principe sous-jacent est que le golf est un jeu d’habileté et un challenge personnel.

10.1
Jouer un coup
10.1a
Frapper franchement la balle
10.1a/1
Examples of Pushing, Scraping or Scooping

These terms have overlapping meanings but can be defined through these three examples of using the club in a manner not allowed by the Rule:

  • A player holes a short putt by striking the ball with the bottom of the clubhead, using a motion similar to that used in making a shot in billiards or shuffleboard. Moving the ball like this is a push.
  • A player moves the club along the surface of the ground pulling it towards him or her. Moving the ball like this is a scrape.
  • A player slides a club beneath and very close to the ball. The player then lifts and moves the ball by use of a forward and upward motion. Moving the ball like this is a scoop.
10.1a/2
Player May Use Any Part of Clubhead to Fairly Strike Ball

In fairly striking a ball, any part of the clubhead may be used, including the toe, heel and back of the clubhead.

10.1a/3
Other Material May Intervene Between Ball and Clubhead During Stroke

In fairly striking a ball, it is not necessary for the clubhead to make contact with the ball. Sometimes other material may intervene.

An example of fairly striking a ball includes when a ball is lying against the base of a fence defining out of bounds and the player makes a stroke at the out-of-bounds side of the fence to make the ball move.

10.1b
Ancrer le club
10.1b/1
Player Must Not Anchor the Club with Forearm Against Body

Holding a forearm against the body during a stroke is an indirect means of anchoring the club.

For an "anchor point" to exist, two things must happen: (1) the player must hold a forearm against the body; and (2) the player must grip the club so that the hands are separated and work independently from each other.

For example, in making a stroke with a long putter, the player's forearm is held against his or her body to establish a stable point, while the bottom hand is held down the shaft to swing the lower portion of the club.

However, a player is allowed to hold one or both forearms against his or her body in making a stroke, so long as doing so does not create an anchor point.

10.1b/2
Deliberate Contact with Clothing During Stroke Is a Breach

Clothing held against the body by a club or gripping hand is treated as if it is part of the player's body for the purpose of applying Rule 10.1b. The concept of a free-flowing swing may not be circumvented by having something intervene between the player's body and club or hand.

 For example, if a player is wearing a rain jacket and is using a mid-length putter, and presses the club into his or her body, the player is in breach of Rule 10.1b.

Additionally, if the player deliberately uses a gripping hand to hold an article of clothing worn on any part of the body (such as holding the sleeve of a shirt with a hand) while making a stroke, there is a breach of Rule 4.3 (Prohibited Use of Equipment) since that is not its intended use and doing so might assist the player in making that stroke.

10.1b/3
Inadvertent Contact with Clothing During Stroke Is Not a Breach

Touching an article of clothing with the club or gripping hand and making a stroke is allowed.

This might occur in various situations where a player:

  • Wears loose fitting clothes or rain gear,
  • Has a physical size or build that causes the arms naturally to rest close to the body,
  • Holds the club extremely close to the body, or
  • For some other reason touches his or her clothing in making a stroke.
10.2
Conseil et autres aides
10.2a
Conseil
10.2a/1
Player May Get Information from Shared Caddie

If a caddie is being shared by more than one player, any of the players sharing that caddie may seek information from him or her.

For example, two players are sharing a caddie and both hit tee shots into a similar area. One of the players gets a club to make the stroke, while the other is undecided. The undecided player is allowed to ask the shared caddie what club the other player chose.

10.2a/2
Player Must Try to Stop Ongoing Advice that Is Given Voluntarily

If a player gets advice from someone other than his or her caddie (such as a spectator) without asking for it, he or she gets no penalty. However, if the player continues to get advice from that same person, the player must try to stop that person from giving advice. If the player does not do so, he or she is treated as asking for that advice and gets the penalty under Rule 10.2a.

In a team competition (Rule 24), this also applies to a player who gets advice from a team captain who has not been named an advice giver.

10.2b
Autres aides
10.2b(3)/1
Setting Clubhead on Ground Behind Ball to Help the Player Take a Stance is Allowed

Rule 10.2b(3) does not allow a player to set down an object (such as an alignment rod or a golf club) to help the player take a stance.

However, this prohibition does not prevent a player from setting his or her clubhead behind the ball, such as when a player stands behind the ball and places the clubhead perpendicular to the line of play and then walks around from behind the ball to take his or her stance.

10.2b(4)/1
Examples of When Player Begins Taking His or Her Stance

Rule 10.2b(4) does not allow a player to have his or her caddie deliberately stand behind him or her when the player begins taking a stance because aiming at the intended target is one of the challenges the player must overcome alone.

There is no set procedure for determining when a player has begun to take a stance since each player has his or her own set-up routine. However, if a player has his or her feet or body close to a position where useful guidance on aiming at the intended target could be given, it should be decided that the player has begun to take his or her stance.

Examples of when a player has begun to take a stance include when:

  • The player is standing beside the ball but facing the hole with his or her club behind the ball, and then starts to turn his or her body to face the ball.
  • After standing behind the ball to determine the target line, the player takes a step forward and then starts to turn his or her body and puts a foot in place for the stroke.
10.2b(4)/C1
Clarification: Meaning of “Begins Taking a Stance for the Stroke”

Rule 10.2b(4) does not allow a player to have his or her caddie deliberately stand on or close to an extension of the line of play behind the ball for any reason when the player begins taking a stance for the stroke. Reference to “the stroke” means the stroke that is actually made.

The player begins to take the stance for the stroke that is actually made when he or she has at least one foot in position for that stance.

If a player backs away from the stance, he or she has not taken a stance for the stroke that is actually made, and the second bullet point in Rule 10.2b(4) does not apply.

Therefore, if a player takes a stance when the caddie is deliberately standing on or close to an extension of the line of play behind the ball, there is no penalty under Rule 10.2b(4) if the player backs away from the stance and does not begin to take a stance for the stroke that is actually made until after the caddie has moved out of that location. This applies anywhere on the course.

Backing away means that the player’s feet or body are no longer in a position where helpful guidance on aiming at the intended target line could be given.

(Clarification added 2/2019)

10.2b(4)/C2
Clarification: Examples of Caddie Not Deliberately Standing Behind Ball When Player Begins Taking Stance for Stroke

Rule 10.2b(4) does not allow a player to have his or her caddie deliberately stand on or close to an extension of the line of play behind the ball for any reason when the player begins taking a stance for the stroke.

The use of the term “deliberately” requires the caddie to be aware that (1) the player is beginning to take a stance for the stroke to be played, and (2) he or she is standing on or close to an extension of the line of play behind the ball.

If the caddie is unaware of either of these two things, the caddie’s action is not deliberate and Rule 10.2b(4) does not apply.

Examples of when a caddie’s action is not considered to be deliberate include when:

  • The caddie is raking a bunker or taking some similar action to care for the course and is not aware that he or she is doing so on or close to an extension of the line of play behind the ball.
  • The player makes a stroke and the ball comes to rest near the hole and the player walks up and taps the ball into the hole while the caddie is unaware he or she is standing on or close to an extension of the line of play behind the ball.
  • The caddie is standing on an extension of the line of play behind the ball but, when the player moves in to begin taking a stance, the caddie is facing away from the player or looking in a different direction and is unaware the player has begun to take his or her stance.
  • The caddie is engaged in a task (such as obtaining a yardage) and is unaware that the player has begun to take the stance.

But, in the examples given above, when the caddie becomes aware that the player has already begun to take a stance for the stroke to be played and he or she is standing on or close to an extension of the line of play behind the ball, the caddie needs to make every effort to move out of the way.

Common acts that caddies take unrelated to the player setting up to the ball, such as checking to see if a player’s club will hit a tree, whether the player has interference from a cart path or holding an umbrella over a player’s head before the stroke, are not treated as deliberate actions under Rule 10.2b(4). After helping the player with such an act, there is no penalty so long as the caddie moves away before the stroke is made.

If either the player or caddie is attempting to circumvent the primary purpose of Rule 10.2b(4), which is to ensure that aiming at the intended target is a challenge that the player must overcome alone, the caddie’s actions are treated as being deliberate.

(Clarification added 2/2019)

10.2b(4)/C3
Clarification: Alignment Help Before Player Has Begun Taking Stance for Stroke

Interpretation 10.2b(4)/1 explains that the primary purpose of Rule 10.2b(4) is to ensure that aiming at the intended target is a challenge that the player must overcome alone.

 In a situation where a player has not yet begun to take his or her stance for the stroke but:

  • the player’s feet or body are close to a position where useful guidance on aiming could be given and 
  • the caddie is deliberately standing on or close to an extension of the line of play behind the ball,

the player is treated as having begun to take a stance for the stroke (even though his or her feet are not in that position) only if the caddie gives the player help with alignment.

If alignment help is given but the player backs away before making the stroke and the caddie moves out from behind the line of play, there is no breach of the Rule. This applies anywhere on the course.

Alignment help includes when the caddie gives help by standing behind the player and moving away without saying anything but, by doing so, is giving a signal to the player that he or she is correctly aimed at the intended target.

(Clarification added 2/2019)

10.2b(5)/1
Player May Ask Another Person Who Was Not Deliberately Positioned to Move or Remain in Place

Although a player may not place an object or position a person for the purpose of blocking the sunlight from the ball, the player may ask a person (such as a spectator) not to move when that spectator is already in position, so that a shadow remains over the ball, or may ask that spectator to move, so that his or her shadow is no longer over the ball.

10.2b(5)/2
Player May Wear Protective Clothing

Although a player must not improve conditions affecting the stroke to protect against the elements, he or she may wear protective clothing to protect against the elements.

For example, if a player's ball comes to rest right next to a cactus, it would breach Rule 8.1a (Actions That Improve Conditions Affecting the Stroke) if he or she placed a towel on the cactus to improve his or her area of intended stance. However, a towel may be wrapped around the player's body to protect him or her from the cactus.

10.3
Cadets
10.3a
Le cadet peut aider le joueur pendant un tour
10.3a/1
Player Transports Clubs on Motorized Golf Cart and Hires Individual to Perform All Other Functions of a Caddie

A player whose clubs are transported on a motorized golf cart that he or she is driving is allowed to hire an individual to perform all the other duties of a caddie, and this individual is considered to be a caddie.

This arrangement is allowed provided the player has not also hired someone else to drive the cart. In such a case, the cart driver is also a caddie since he is transporting the player's clubs, and the player gets a penalty under Rule 10.3a(1) for having more than one caddie.

10.3a/2
Player May Caddie for Another Player When Not Playing a Round

A player in a competition may caddie for another player in the same competition, except when the player is playing his or her round or when a Local Rule restricts the player from being a caddie.

For example:

  • If two players are playing in the same competition but at different times on the same day, they are allowed to caddie for each other.
  • In stroke play, if one player in a group withdraws during a round, he or she may caddie for another player in the group.
10.3b
Ce qu'un cadet peut faire
10.3b(2)/C1
Clarification: Caddie May Lift Ball When Player Will Take Relief

So long as it is reasonable to conclude that the player is taking relief under a Rule, his or her caddie is treated as being given authorization to lift the ball and may do so without penalty.

(Clarification added 12/2018)

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Déplacée (balle)

Quand une balle au repos a quitté son emplacement d'origine et vient reposer à n'importe quel autre endroit, et que cela peut être vu à l'œil nu (peu importe que quelqu'un ait vu effectivement ou non ce déplacement).

Ceci s'applique que la balle se soit éloignée de son emplacement d'origine vers le haut, vers le bas ou horizontalement dans n'importe quelle direction.

Si la balle oscille seulement et reste sur ou revient à son emplacement d'origine, la balle ne s'est pas déplacée.

 

Interpretation Moved/1 - When Ball Resting on Object Has Moved

For the purpose of deciding whether a ball must be replaced or whether a player gets a penalty, a ball is treated as having moved only if it has moved in relation to a specific part of the larger condition or object it is resting on, unless the entire object the ball is resting on has moved in relation to the ground.

An example of when a ball has not moved includes when:

  • A ball is resting in the fork of a tree branch and the tree branch moves, but the ball's spot in the branch does not change.

Examples of when a ball has moved include when:

  • A ball is resting in a stationary plastic cup and the cup itself moves in relation to the ground because it is being blown by the wind.
  • A ball is resting in or on a stationary motorized cart that starts to move.

Interpretation Moved/2 - Television Evidence Shows Ball at Rest Changed Position but by Amount Not Reasonably Discernible to Naked Eye

When determining whether or not a ball at rest has moved, a player must make that judgment based on all the information reasonably available to him or her at the time, so that he or she can determine whether the ball must be replaced under the Rules. When the player's ball has left its original position and come to rest in another place by an amount that was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, a player's determination that the ball has not moved is conclusive, even if that determination is later shown to be incorrect through the use of sophisticated technology.

On the other hand, if the Committee determines, based on all of the evidence it has available, that the ball changed its position by an amount that was reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, the ball will be determined to have moved even though no-one actually saw it move.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Conseil

Tout commentaire verbal ou action (par ex. montrer quel club vient d'être utilisé pour jouer un coup) qui est destiné à influencer un joueur dans :

  • Le choix d'un club,
  • Jouer un coup, ou
  • La manière de jouer pendant un trou ou un tour.

Mais un conseil n'inclut pas des faits notoirement connus, par ex. :

  • La position d'éléments sur le parcours tel que le trou, le green, le fairway, les zones à pénalité, les bunkers, ou la balle d'un autre joueur.
  • La distance d'un point à un autre point, ou
  • Les Règles.

 

Interpretation Advice/1 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Advice

Examples of when comments or actions are considered advice and are not allowed include:

  • A player makes a statement regarding club selection that was intended to be overheard by another player who had a similar stroke.
  • In individual stroke play, Player A, who has just holed out on the 7th hole, demonstrates to Player B, whose ball was just off the putting green, how to make the next stroke. Because Player B has not completed the hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 7th hole. But, if both Player A and Player B had completed the 7th hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 8th hole.
  • A player's ball is lying badly and the player is deliberating what action to take. Another player comments, “You have no shot at all. If I were you, I would decide to take unplayable ball relief.“ This comment is advice because it could have influenced the player in deciding how to play during a hole.
  • While a player is setting up to hit his or her shot over a large penalty area filled with water, another player in the group comments, “You know the wind is in your face and it's 250 yards to carry that water?“

Interpretation Advice/2 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Not Advice

Examples of comments or actions that are not advice include:

  • During play of the 6th hole, a player asks another player what club he or she used on the 4th hole that is a par-3 of similar length.
  • A player makes a second stroke that lands on the putting green. Another player does likewise. The first player then asks the second player what club was used for the second stroke.
  • After making a stroke, a player says, “I should have used a 5-iron“ to another player in the group that has yet to play onto the green, but not intending to influence his or her play.
  • A player looks into another player's bag to determine which club he or she used for the last stroke without touching or moving anything.
  • While lining up a putt, a player mistakenly seeks advice from another player's caddie, believing that caddie to be the player's caddie. The player immediately realizes the mistake and tells the other caddie not to answer.
Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Conseil

Tout commentaire verbal ou action (par ex. montrer quel club vient d'être utilisé pour jouer un coup) qui est destiné à influencer un joueur dans :

  • Le choix d'un club,
  • Jouer un coup, ou
  • La manière de jouer pendant un trou ou un tour.

Mais un conseil n'inclut pas des faits notoirement connus, par ex. :

  • La position d'éléments sur le parcours tel que le trou, le green, le fairway, les zones à pénalité, les bunkers, ou la balle d'un autre joueur.
  • La distance d'un point à un autre point, ou
  • Les Règles.

 

Interpretation Advice/1 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Advice

Examples of when comments or actions are considered advice and are not allowed include:

  • A player makes a statement regarding club selection that was intended to be overheard by another player who had a similar stroke.
  • In individual stroke play, Player A, who has just holed out on the 7th hole, demonstrates to Player B, whose ball was just off the putting green, how to make the next stroke. Because Player B has not completed the hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 7th hole. But, if both Player A and Player B had completed the 7th hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 8th hole.
  • A player's ball is lying badly and the player is deliberating what action to take. Another player comments, “You have no shot at all. If I were you, I would decide to take unplayable ball relief.“ This comment is advice because it could have influenced the player in deciding how to play during a hole.
  • While a player is setting up to hit his or her shot over a large penalty area filled with water, another player in the group comments, “You know the wind is in your face and it's 250 yards to carry that water?“

Interpretation Advice/2 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Not Advice

Examples of comments or actions that are not advice include:

  • During play of the 6th hole, a player asks another player what club he or she used on the 4th hole that is a par-3 of similar length.
  • A player makes a second stroke that lands on the putting green. Another player does likewise. The first player then asks the second player what club was used for the second stroke.
  • After making a stroke, a player says, “I should have used a 5-iron“ to another player in the group that has yet to play onto the green, but not intending to influence his or her play.
  • A player looks into another player's bag to determine which club he or she used for the last stroke without touching or moving anything.
  • While lining up a putt, a player mistakenly seeks advice from another player's caddie, believing that caddie to be the player's caddie. The player immediately realizes the mistake and tells the other caddie not to answer.
Conseil

Tout commentaire verbal ou action (par ex. montrer quel club vient d'être utilisé pour jouer un coup) qui est destiné à influencer un joueur dans :

  • Le choix d'un club,
  • Jouer un coup, ou
  • La manière de jouer pendant un trou ou un tour.

Mais un conseil n'inclut pas des faits notoirement connus, par ex. :

  • La position d'éléments sur le parcours tel que le trou, le green, le fairway, les zones à pénalité, les bunkers, ou la balle d'un autre joueur.
  • La distance d'un point à un autre point, ou
  • Les Règles.

 

Interpretation Advice/1 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Advice

Examples of when comments or actions are considered advice and are not allowed include:

  • A player makes a statement regarding club selection that was intended to be overheard by another player who had a similar stroke.
  • In individual stroke play, Player A, who has just holed out on the 7th hole, demonstrates to Player B, whose ball was just off the putting green, how to make the next stroke. Because Player B has not completed the hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 7th hole. But, if both Player A and Player B had completed the 7th hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 8th hole.
  • A player's ball is lying badly and the player is deliberating what action to take. Another player comments, “You have no shot at all. If I were you, I would decide to take unplayable ball relief.“ This comment is advice because it could have influenced the player in deciding how to play during a hole.
  • While a player is setting up to hit his or her shot over a large penalty area filled with water, another player in the group comments, “You know the wind is in your face and it's 250 yards to carry that water?“

Interpretation Advice/2 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Not Advice

Examples of comments or actions that are not advice include:

  • During play of the 6th hole, a player asks another player what club he or she used on the 4th hole that is a par-3 of similar length.
  • A player makes a second stroke that lands on the putting green. Another player does likewise. The first player then asks the second player what club was used for the second stroke.
  • After making a stroke, a player says, “I should have used a 5-iron“ to another player in the group that has yet to play onto the green, but not intending to influence his or her play.
  • A player looks into another player's bag to determine which club he or she used for the last stroke without touching or moving anything.
  • While lining up a putt, a player mistakenly seeks advice from another player's caddie, believing that caddie to be the player's caddie. The player immediately realizes the mistake and tells the other caddie not to answer.
Conseil

Tout commentaire verbal ou action (par ex. montrer quel club vient d'être utilisé pour jouer un coup) qui est destiné à influencer un joueur dans :

  • Le choix d'un club,
  • Jouer un coup, ou
  • La manière de jouer pendant un trou ou un tour.

Mais un conseil n'inclut pas des faits notoirement connus, par ex. :

  • La position d'éléments sur le parcours tel que le trou, le green, le fairway, les zones à pénalité, les bunkers, ou la balle d'un autre joueur.
  • La distance d'un point à un autre point, ou
  • Les Règles.

 

Interpretation Advice/1 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Advice

Examples of when comments or actions are considered advice and are not allowed include:

  • A player makes a statement regarding club selection that was intended to be overheard by another player who had a similar stroke.
  • In individual stroke play, Player A, who has just holed out on the 7th hole, demonstrates to Player B, whose ball was just off the putting green, how to make the next stroke. Because Player B has not completed the hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 7th hole. But, if both Player A and Player B had completed the 7th hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 8th hole.
  • A player's ball is lying badly and the player is deliberating what action to take. Another player comments, “You have no shot at all. If I were you, I would decide to take unplayable ball relief.“ This comment is advice because it could have influenced the player in deciding how to play during a hole.
  • While a player is setting up to hit his or her shot over a large penalty area filled with water, another player in the group comments, “You know the wind is in your face and it's 250 yards to carry that water?“

Interpretation Advice/2 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Not Advice

Examples of comments or actions that are not advice include:

  • During play of the 6th hole, a player asks another player what club he or she used on the 4th hole that is a par-3 of similar length.
  • A player makes a second stroke that lands on the putting green. Another player does likewise. The first player then asks the second player what club was used for the second stroke.
  • After making a stroke, a player says, “I should have used a 5-iron“ to another player in the group that has yet to play onto the green, but not intending to influence his or her play.
  • A player looks into another player's bag to determine which club he or she used for the last stroke without touching or moving anything.
  • While lining up a putt, a player mistakenly seeks advice from another player's caddie, believing that caddie to be the player's caddie. The player immediately realizes the mistake and tells the other caddie not to answer.
Conseil

Tout commentaire verbal ou action (par ex. montrer quel club vient d'être utilisé pour jouer un coup) qui est destiné à influencer un joueur dans :

  • Le choix d'un club,
  • Jouer un coup, ou
  • La manière de jouer pendant un trou ou un tour.

Mais un conseil n'inclut pas des faits notoirement connus, par ex. :

  • La position d'éléments sur le parcours tel que le trou, le green, le fairway, les zones à pénalité, les bunkers, ou la balle d'un autre joueur.
  • La distance d'un point à un autre point, ou
  • Les Règles.

 

Interpretation Advice/1 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Advice

Examples of when comments or actions are considered advice and are not allowed include:

  • A player makes a statement regarding club selection that was intended to be overheard by another player who had a similar stroke.
  • In individual stroke play, Player A, who has just holed out on the 7th hole, demonstrates to Player B, whose ball was just off the putting green, how to make the next stroke. Because Player B has not completed the hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 7th hole. But, if both Player A and Player B had completed the 7th hole, Player A gets the penalty on the 8th hole.
  • A player's ball is lying badly and the player is deliberating what action to take. Another player comments, “You have no shot at all. If I were you, I would decide to take unplayable ball relief.“ This comment is advice because it could have influenced the player in deciding how to play during a hole.
  • While a player is setting up to hit his or her shot over a large penalty area filled with water, another player in the group comments, “You know the wind is in your face and it's 250 yards to carry that water?“

Interpretation Advice/2 - Verbal Comments or Actions That Are Not Advice

Examples of comments or actions that are not advice include:

  • During play of the 6th hole, a player asks another player what club he or she used on the 4th hole that is a par-3 of similar length.
  • A player makes a second stroke that lands on the putting green. Another player does likewise. The first player then asks the second player what club was used for the second stroke.
  • After making a stroke, a player says, “I should have used a 5-iron“ to another player in the group that has yet to play onto the green, but not intending to influence his or her play.
  • A player looks into another player's bag to determine which club he or she used for the last stroke without touching or moving anything.
  • While lining up a putt, a player mistakenly seeks advice from another player's caddie, believing that caddie to be the player's caddie. The player immediately realizes the mistake and tells the other caddie not to answer.
Stance

La position des pieds et du corps d'un joueur lorsqu'il se prépare à jouer et joue un coup.

Ligne de jeu

La ligne que le joueur souhaiterait que sa balle suive à la suite d'un coup, y compris la zone sur cette ligne qui est à une distance raisonnable au-dessus du sol et de chaque côté de cette ligne.

La ligne de jeu n'est pas nécessairement une ligne droite entre deux points (par ex : il peut s'agir d'une ligne courbe en fonction de l'endroit où le joueur a l'intention que sa balle aille).

Stance

La position des pieds et du corps d'un joueur lorsqu'il se prépare à jouer et joue un coup.

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Stance

La position des pieds et du corps d'un joueur lorsqu'il se prépare à jouer et joue un coup.

Stance

La position des pieds et du corps d'un joueur lorsqu'il se prépare à jouer et joue un coup.

Stance

La position des pieds et du corps d'un joueur lorsqu'il se prépare à jouer et joue un coup.

Stance

La position des pieds et du corps d'un joueur lorsqu'il se prépare à jouer et joue un coup.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Améliorer

Modifier une ou plusieurs des conditions affectant le coup ou d'autres conditions physiques affectant le jeu de telle sorte que le joueur en tire un avantage potentiel pour le coup.

Conditions affectant le coup

Le lie de la balle au repos du joueur, la zone de son stance intentionnel, la zone de son swing intentionnel, sa ligne de jeu et la zone de dégagement dans laquelle le joueur va dropper ou placer une balle.

  •  La “zone du stance intentionnel“ comprend à la fois l'endroit où le joueur placera ses pieds et toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la manière et l'endroit où le corps du joueur est positionné pour la préparation et le jeu du coup prévu.
  • La “zone du swing intentionnel“ comprend toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la montée ou la descente du club ou la fin du swing pour le coup prévu.
  • Chacun des termes lie, ligne de jeu et zone de dégagement possède sa propre définition.
Améliorer

Modifier une ou plusieurs des conditions affectant le coup ou d'autres conditions physiques affectant le jeu de telle sorte que le joueur en tire un avantage potentiel pour le coup.

Stance

La position des pieds et du corps d'un joueur lorsqu'il se prépare à jouer et joue un coup.

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).