The R&A - Working for Golf
Dégagement de détritus et d'obstructions amovibles (y compris une balle ou un marque-balle aidant ou gênant le jeu)
Aller à la Section
15.1
15.1a
15.1a/1
15.1a/2
15.1a/3
15.3
15.3a
15.3a/1
15.3a/2
15.3
15.3/C1

Objet de la Règle : La Règle 15 traite de quand et comment le joueur peut prendre un dégagement gratuit des détritus et des obstructions amovibles.

  • Ces éléments naturels et artificiels amovibles ne sont pas considérés comme faisant partie du challenge proposé en jouant le parcours, et un joueur est normalement autorisé à les enlever quand ils interfèrent avec le jeu.
  • Mais le joueur doit être prudent en déplaçant des détritus près de sa balle n'importe où ailleurs que sur le green, car il y aura une pénalité si leur déplacement entraîne le déplacement de la balle.
15.1
Détritus
15.1a
Enlèvement des détritus
15.1a/1
Removing a Loose Impediment, Including Assistance from Others

Loose impediments come in many shapes and sizes (such as acorns and large rocks), and the means and methods by which they may be removed are not limited, except that removal must not unreasonably delay play (see Rule 5.6a).

For example, a player may use a towel, hand or hat, or may lift or push a loose impediment for removal. A player is also allowed to seek help in removing loose impediments, such as by asking spectators for assistance in removing a large tree branch.

15.1a/2
Player Allowed to Break Off Part of Loose Impediment

While Rule 15.1a allows a player to remove a loose impediment, he or she may also break off part of a loose impediment.

For example, a player's ball comes to rest behind a large branch that has broken off a tree. Rather than seek help from other players to remove the entire tree branch, the player may break off the part that is in his or her way.

15.1a/3
Removal of Loose Impediment from Relief Area or Spot Where Ball to Be Dropped, Placed or Replaced

Exception 1 to Rule 15.1a makes clear that, before replacing a ball, the player must not remove a loose impediment that, if moved when the ball was at rest, would have been likely to cause the ball to move. This is because when the ball is in its initial location, the player risks the ball moving when removing the loose impediment.

However, when a ball is to be dropped or placed, the ball is not being put back in a specific spot and therefore removing loose impediments before dropping or placing a ball is allowed.

For example, if a player is applying Rule 14.3b when dropping a ball in a relief area or Rule 14.3c(2) when a dropped ball will not stay in a relief area and the player now must place a ball, the player is allowed to remove loose impediments from the relief area into which a ball will be dropped or from on or around the spot on which the player must place a ball.

15.3
Balle ou marque-balle aidant ou gênant le jeu
15.3a
Balle sur le green aidant le jeu
15.3a/1
Breach of Rule for Leaving Helping Ball in Place Does Not Require Knowledge

In stroke play, under Rule 15.3a, if two or more players agree to leave a ball in place on the putting green to help any player, and the stroke is made with the helping ball left in place, each player who made the agreement gets two penalty strokes. A breach of Rule 15.3a does not depend on whether the players know that such an agreement is not allowed.

For example, in stroke play, before playing from just off the putting green, a player asks another player to leave his or her ball that is near the hole, in order to use it as a backstop. Without knowing this is not allowed, the other player agrees to leave his or her ball by the hole to help the other player. Once the stroke is made with the ball in place, both players get the penalty under Rule 15.3a.

The same outcome would apply if the player whose ball was near the hole offered to leave the ball in play to help the other player, and the other player accepted the offer and then played.

If the players know that they are not allowed to make such an agreement, but still do it, they are both disqualified under Rule 1.3b(1) for deliberately ignoring Rule 15.3a.

15.3a/2
Players Allowed to Leave Helping Ball in Match Play

In a match, a player may agree to leave his or her ball in place to help the opponent since the outcome of any benefit that may come from the agreement affects only their match.

15.3/C1
Backstopping

“Backstopping” is the common term used to describe the following situation in stroke play:

A player, without agreement with any other player, leaves his or her ball in place on the putting green close to the hole in a position where another player, who is about to play from off the putting green, could benefit if his or her ball struck the ball at rest.

As there has been no agreement to leave the ball in place to help any player, there is no breach of the Rules – see Rule 15.3a.

However, The R&A and USGA take the view that “backstopping” fails to take into account all of the other players in the competition and has the potential to give the player with the “backstop” an advantage over those other players.

Consequently, The R&A and USGA offer players the following guidance and explanation of best practice:

  • In stroke play, the competition involves all players and, because each player in the competition cannot be present to protect his or her own interests, protecting the field is an important responsibility that all players in the competition share.
  • Therefore, in stroke play, if there is a reasonable possibility that a player’s ball close to the hole could help another player who is about to play from off the green, both players should ensure that the player whose ball is close to the hole marks and lifts that ball before the other player plays.

If all players follow this best practice, it ensures the protection of the interests of everyone in the competition.

(Clarification added - 1/2020)

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Déplacée (balle)

Quand une balle au repos a quitté son emplacement d'origine et vient reposer à n'importe quel autre endroit, et que cela peut être vu à l'œil nu (peu importe que quelqu'un ait vu effectivement ou non ce déplacement).

Ceci s'applique que la balle se soit éloignée de son emplacement d'origine vers le haut, vers le bas ou horizontalement dans n'importe quelle direction.

Si la balle oscille seulement et reste sur ou revient à son emplacement d'origine, la balle ne s'est pas déplacée.

 

Interpretation Moved/1 - When Ball Resting on Object Has Moved

For the purpose of deciding whether a ball must be replaced or whether a player gets a penalty, a ball is treated as having moved only if it has moved in relation to a specific part of the larger condition or object it is resting on, unless the entire object the ball is resting on has moved in relation to the ground.

An example of when a ball has not moved includes when:

  • A ball is resting in the fork of a tree branch and the tree branch moves, but the ball's spot in the branch does not change.

Examples of when a ball has moved include when:

  • A ball is resting in a stationary plastic cup and the cup itself moves in relation to the ground because it is being blown by the wind.
  • A ball is resting in or on a stationary motorized cart that starts to move.

Interpretation Moved/2 - Television Evidence Shows Ball at Rest Changed Position but by Amount Not Reasonably Discernible to Naked Eye

When determining whether or not a ball at rest has moved, a player must make that judgment based on all the information reasonably available to him or her at the time, so that he or she can determine whether the ball must be replaced under the Rules. When the player's ball has left its original position and come to rest in another place by an amount that was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, a player's determination that the ball has not moved is conclusive, even if that determination is later shown to be incorrect through the use of sophisticated technology.

On the other hand, if the Committee determines, based on all of the evidence it has available, that the ball changed its position by an amount that was reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, the ball will be determined to have moved even though no-one actually saw it move.

Déplacée (balle)

Quand une balle au repos a quitté son emplacement d'origine et vient reposer à n'importe quel autre endroit, et que cela peut être vu à l'œil nu (peu importe que quelqu'un ait vu effectivement ou non ce déplacement).

Ceci s'applique que la balle se soit éloignée de son emplacement d'origine vers le haut, vers le bas ou horizontalement dans n'importe quelle direction.

Si la balle oscille seulement et reste sur ou revient à son emplacement d'origine, la balle ne s'est pas déplacée.

 

Interpretation Moved/1 - When Ball Resting on Object Has Moved

For the purpose of deciding whether a ball must be replaced or whether a player gets a penalty, a ball is treated as having moved only if it has moved in relation to a specific part of the larger condition or object it is resting on, unless the entire object the ball is resting on has moved in relation to the ground.

An example of when a ball has not moved includes when:

  • A ball is resting in the fork of a tree branch and the tree branch moves, but the ball's spot in the branch does not change.

Examples of when a ball has moved include when:

  • A ball is resting in a stationary plastic cup and the cup itself moves in relation to the ground because it is being blown by the wind.
  • A ball is resting in or on a stationary motorized cart that starts to move.

Interpretation Moved/2 - Television Evidence Shows Ball at Rest Changed Position but by Amount Not Reasonably Discernible to Naked Eye

When determining whether or not a ball at rest has moved, a player must make that judgment based on all the information reasonably available to him or her at the time, so that he or she can determine whether the ball must be replaced under the Rules. When the player's ball has left its original position and come to rest in another place by an amount that was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, a player's determination that the ball has not moved is conclusive, even if that determination is later shown to be incorrect through the use of sophisticated technology.

On the other hand, if the Committee determines, based on all of the evidence it has available, that the ball changed its position by an amount that was reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, the ball will be determined to have moved even though no-one actually saw it move.

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Zone de dégagement

La zone dans laquelle un joueur doit dropper une balle en se dégageant selon une Règle. Chaque Règle de dégagement exige que le joueur utilise une zone de dégagement spécifique dont la taille et l'emplacement sont basés sur les trois facteurs suivants :

  • Le point de référence : le point à partir duquel la dimension de la zone de dégagement est mesurée.
  • La dimension de la zone de dégagement mesurée à partir du point de référence : la zone de dégagement est soit une, soit deux longueurs de club à partir du point de référence, mais avec certaines limites :
  • Les limites de l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement : l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement peut être limité d'une ou plusieurs façons, de sorte que, par exemple :
    • Cet emplacement ne soit que dans certaines zones du parcours spécifiquement définies, par ex. seulement dans la zone générale, ou pas dans un bunker ni dans une zone à pénalité,
    • Cet emplacement ne soit pas plus près du trou que le point de référence ou qu'il doive être à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité ou d'un bunker d'où le dégagement est pris, ou
    • Cet emplacement se situe à un endroit où il n'y a plus d'interférence (telle que définie dans la Règle particulière) de la condition pour laquelle le dégagement est pris.

En utilisant les longueurs de club pour déterminer la taille d'une zone de dégagement, le joueur peut mesurer directement à travers un fossé, un trou ou un élément similaire, et directement à travers un objet (comme un arbre, une clôture, un mur,un tunnel, un drain ou une tête d'arroseur) mais il n'est pas autorisé à mesurer à travers un sol qui est naturellement en pente montante ou descendante.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 2I (le Comité peut choisir d'autoriser ou d'exiger l'utilisation par le joueur d'une dropping zone en tant que zone de dégagement).


Clarification - Déterminer si la balle repose ou non dans la zone de dégagement.

Lorsqu’on cherche à déterminer si une balle est venue reposer à l’intérieur d’une zone de dégagement (par ex. à une ou deux longueurs de club du point de référence selon la Règle appliquée), la balle est dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle se trouve à l’intérieur de la mesure d’une ou deux longueurs de club. Cependant une balle n’est pas dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle est plus proche du trou que le point de référence ou si la condition à l’origine du dégagement gratuit interfère avec n’importe quelle partie de la balle.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Zone de dégagement

La zone dans laquelle un joueur doit dropper une balle en se dégageant selon une Règle. Chaque Règle de dégagement exige que le joueur utilise une zone de dégagement spécifique dont la taille et l'emplacement sont basés sur les trois facteurs suivants :

  • Le point de référence : le point à partir duquel la dimension de la zone de dégagement est mesurée.
  • La dimension de la zone de dégagement mesurée à partir du point de référence : la zone de dégagement est soit une, soit deux longueurs de club à partir du point de référence, mais avec certaines limites :
  • Les limites de l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement : l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement peut être limité d'une ou plusieurs façons, de sorte que, par exemple :
    • Cet emplacement ne soit que dans certaines zones du parcours spécifiquement définies, par ex. seulement dans la zone générale, ou pas dans un bunker ni dans une zone à pénalité,
    • Cet emplacement ne soit pas plus près du trou que le point de référence ou qu'il doive être à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité ou d'un bunker d'où le dégagement est pris, ou
    • Cet emplacement se situe à un endroit où il n'y a plus d'interférence (telle que définie dans la Règle particulière) de la condition pour laquelle le dégagement est pris.

En utilisant les longueurs de club pour déterminer la taille d'une zone de dégagement, le joueur peut mesurer directement à travers un fossé, un trou ou un élément similaire, et directement à travers un objet (comme un arbre, une clôture, un mur,un tunnel, un drain ou une tête d'arroseur) mais il n'est pas autorisé à mesurer à travers un sol qui est naturellement en pente montante ou descendante.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 2I (le Comité peut choisir d'autoriser ou d'exiger l'utilisation par le joueur d'une dropping zone en tant que zone de dégagement).


Clarification - Déterminer si la balle repose ou non dans la zone de dégagement.

Lorsqu’on cherche à déterminer si une balle est venue reposer à l’intérieur d’une zone de dégagement (par ex. à une ou deux longueurs de club du point de référence selon la Règle appliquée), la balle est dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle se trouve à l’intérieur de la mesure d’une ou deux longueurs de club. Cependant une balle n’est pas dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle est plus proche du trou que le point de référence ou si la condition à l’origine du dégagement gratuit interfère avec n’importe quelle partie de la balle.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Zone de dégagement

La zone dans laquelle un joueur doit dropper une balle en se dégageant selon une Règle. Chaque Règle de dégagement exige que le joueur utilise une zone de dégagement spécifique dont la taille et l'emplacement sont basés sur les trois facteurs suivants :

  • Le point de référence : le point à partir duquel la dimension de la zone de dégagement est mesurée.
  • La dimension de la zone de dégagement mesurée à partir du point de référence : la zone de dégagement est soit une, soit deux longueurs de club à partir du point de référence, mais avec certaines limites :
  • Les limites de l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement : l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement peut être limité d'une ou plusieurs façons, de sorte que, par exemple :
    • Cet emplacement ne soit que dans certaines zones du parcours spécifiquement définies, par ex. seulement dans la zone générale, ou pas dans un bunker ni dans une zone à pénalité,
    • Cet emplacement ne soit pas plus près du trou que le point de référence ou qu'il doive être à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité ou d'un bunker d'où le dégagement est pris, ou
    • Cet emplacement se situe à un endroit où il n'y a plus d'interférence (telle que définie dans la Règle particulière) de la condition pour laquelle le dégagement est pris.

En utilisant les longueurs de club pour déterminer la taille d'une zone de dégagement, le joueur peut mesurer directement à travers un fossé, un trou ou un élément similaire, et directement à travers un objet (comme un arbre, une clôture, un mur,un tunnel, un drain ou une tête d'arroseur) mais il n'est pas autorisé à mesurer à travers un sol qui est naturellement en pente montante ou descendante.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 2I (le Comité peut choisir d'autoriser ou d'exiger l'utilisation par le joueur d'une dropping zone en tant que zone de dégagement).


Clarification - Déterminer si la balle repose ou non dans la zone de dégagement.

Lorsqu’on cherche à déterminer si une balle est venue reposer à l’intérieur d’une zone de dégagement (par ex. à une ou deux longueurs de club du point de référence selon la Règle appliquée), la balle est dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle se trouve à l’intérieur de la mesure d’une ou deux longueurs de club. Cependant une balle n’est pas dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle est plus proche du trou que le point de référence ou si la condition à l’origine du dégagement gratuit interfère avec n’importe quelle partie de la balle.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.