The R&A - Working for Golf
Dégagement coup et distance, balle perdue ou hors limites ; balle provisoire
Aller à la Section
18.1
18.1
18.1/1
18.1/2
18.2
18.2a
18.2a(1)/1
18.2a(1)/2
18.2a(1)/3
18.2a(2)/1
18.3
18.3a
18.3a/1
18.3a/2
18.3a/3
18.3b
18.3b/1
18.3b/2
18.3c
18.3c(1)/1
18.3c(2)/1
18.3c(2)/2
18.3c(2)/3
18.3c(2)/4
18.3c(2)/5
18.3c(3)/1

Objet de la Règle : la Règle 18 traite du dégagement avec pénalité coup et distance. Quand une balle est perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité ou repose hors limites, l'exigence de jouer depuis la zone de départ jusqu'à ce que la balle soit entrée ne peut plus être satisfaite ; pour poursuivre le jeu, le joueur doit jouer à nouveau de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué.

Cette Règle traite également de comment et quand une balle provisoire peut être jouée pour gagner du temps lorsque la balle en jeu risque d'être hors limites ou d'être perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

18.1
Dégagement selon la pénalité coup et distance autorisé à tout moment
18.1/1
Teed Ball May Be Lifted When Original Ball Is Found Within Three-Minute Search Time

When playing again from the teeing area, a ball that is placed, dropped or teed in the teeing area is not in play until the player makes a stroke at it (definition of "in play" and Rule 6.2).

For example, a player plays from the teeing area, searches briefly for his or her ball and then goes back and tees another ball. Before the player plays the teed ball, and within the three-minute search time, the original ball is found. The player may abandon the teed ball and continue with the original ball without penalty, but is also allowed to proceed under stroke and distance by playing from the teeing area.

However, if the player had played from the general area and then dropped another ball to take stroke-and-distance relief, the outcome would be different in that the player must continue with the dropped ball under penalty of stroke and distance. If the player continued with the original ball in this case, he or she would be playing a wrong ball.

18.1/2
Penalty Cannot Be Avoided by Playing Under Stroke and Distance

If a player lifts his or her ball when not allowed to do so, the player cannot avoid the one-stroke penalty under Rule 9.4b by then deciding to play under stroke and distance.

For example, a player's tee shot comes to rest in a wooded area. The player picks up a ball, believing it is a stray ball, but discovers the ball was the ball in play. The player then decides to play under stroke and distance.

The player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 9.4b in addition to the stroke and distance penalty under Rule 18.1, since at the time the ball was lifted the player was not allowed to lift the ball and had no intention to play under stroke and distance. The player's next stroke will be his or her fourth.

18.2
Balle perdue ou hors limites : dégagement coup et distance obligatoire
18.2a
Balle perdue ou hors limites
18.2a(1)/1
Time Permitted for Search When Search Temporarily Interrupted

A player is allowed three minutes to search for his or her ball before it becomes lost. However, there are situations when the "clock stops" and such time does not count towards the player's three minutes.

The following examples illustrate how to account for the time when a search is temporarily interrupted:

  • In stroke play, a player searches for his or her ball for one minute and finds a ball. The player assumes that ball is his or her ball, takes 30 seconds to decide how to make the stroke, choose a club, and plays that ball. The player then discovers that it is a wrong ball.
    When the player returns to the area where the original ball was likely to be and resumes search, he or she has two more minutes to search. The time of search stopped when the player found the wrong ball and stopped searching.
  • A player has been searching for his or her ball for two minutes when play is suspended by the Committee. The player continues searching. When three minutes has elapsed from when the player began searching, the ball is lost even if the three-minute search time ends while play is suspended.
  • A player has been searching for his or her ball for one minute when play is suspended. The player continues to search for one more minute and then stops the search to seek shelter. When the player returns to the course to resume play, the player is allowed one more minute to search for the ball even if play has not been resumed.
  • A player finds and identifies his or her ball in high rough after a two-minute search. The player leaves the area to get a club. When he or she returns, the ball cannot be found. The player has one minute to search before the ball becomes lost. The three-minute search time stopped when the ball was first found.
  • A player is searching for his or her ball for two minutes, then steps aside to allow the following group to play through. The search time stops when the search is temporarily stopped, and the player is allowed one more minute to search.
18.2a(1)/2
Caddie Is Not Required to Start Searching for Player’s Ball Before Player

A player may instruct his or her caddie not to begin searching for his or her ball.

For example, a player hits a long drive into heavy rough and another player hits a short drive into heavy rough. The player's caddie starts walking ahead to the location where the player's ball might be to start searching. Everyone else, including the player, walks towards the location where the other player's ball might be to look for that player's ball.

The player may direct his or her caddie to look for the other player's ball and delay search for his or her ball until everyone else can assist.

18.2a(1)/3
Ball May Become Lost if It is Not Promptly Identified

When a player has the opportunity to identify a ball as his or hers within the three-minute search time but fails to do so, the ball is lost when the search time expires.

For example, a player begins to search for his or her ball and after two minutes finds a ball that the player believes to be another player's ball and resumes search for his or her ball.

The three-minute search time elapses and it is then discovered that the ball the player found and believed to be another player's ball was in fact the player's ball. In this case, the player's ball is lost because he or she continued the search, failing to identify the found ball promptly.

18.2a(2)/1
Ball Moved Out of Bounds by Flow of Water

If a flow of water (either temporary water or water in a penalty area) carries a ball out of bounds, the player must take stroke-and-distance relief (Rule 18.2b). Water is a natural force, not an outside influence, therefore Rule 9.6 does not apply.

18.3
Balle provisoire
18.3a
Autorisation de jouer une balle provisoire
18.3a/1
When Player May Play Provisional Ball

When a player is deciding whether he or she is allowed to play a provisional ball, only the information that is known by the player at that time is considered.

Examples where a provisional ball may be played include when:

  • The original ball might be in a penalty area, but it might also be lost outside a penalty area or be out of bounds.
  • A player believes the original ball came to rest in the general area and it might be lost. If it is later found in a penalty area within the three-minute search time, the player must abandon the provisional ball.
18.3a/2
Playing Provisional Ball After Search Has Started Is Allowed

A player may play a provisional ball for a ball that might be lost when the original ball has not been found and identified even if the three-minute search time has not yet ended.

For example, if a player is able to return to the spot of his or her previous stroke and play a provisional ball before the three-minute search time has ended, the player is allowed to do so.

If the player plays the provisional ball and the original ball is then found within the three-minute search time, the player must continue play with the original ball.

18.3a/3
Each Ball Relates Only to the Previous Ball When It Is Played from That Same Spot

When a player plays multiple balls from the same spot, each ball relates only to the previous ball played.

For example, a player plays a provisional ball believing that his or her tee shot might be lost or out of bounds. The provisional ball is struck in the same direction as the original ball and, without any announcement, he or she plays another ball from the tee. This ball comes to rest in the fairway.

If the original ball is not lost or out of bounds, the player must continue play with the original ball without penalty.

However, if the original ball is lost or out of bounds, the player must continue play with the third ball played from the tee since it was played without any announcement. Therefore, the third ball was a ball substituted for the provisional ball under penalty of stroke and distance (Rule 18.1), regardless of the provisional ball's location. The player has now taken 5 strokes (including penalty strokes) with the third ball played from the tee.

18.3b
Annoncer le jeu d'une balle provisoire
18.3b/1
What Is Considered Announcement of Provisional Ball

Although Rule 18.3b does not specify to whom the announcement of a provisional ball must be made, an announcement must be made so that people in the vicinity of the player can hear it.

For example, with other people nearby, if a player states that he or she will be playing a provisional ball but does so in a way that only he or she can hear it, this does not satisfy the requirement in Rule 18.3b that the player must "announce" that he or she is going to play a provisional ball. Any ball played in these circumstances becomes the player's ball in play under penalty of stroke and distance.

If there are no other people nearby to hear the player's announcement (such as when a player has returned to the teeing area after briefly searching for his or her ball), the player is considered to have correctly announced that he or she has the intent to play a provisional ball provided that he or she informs someone of that when it becomes possible to do so.

18.3b/2
Statements That “Clearly Indicate” That a Provisional Ball Is Being Played

When playing a provisional ball, it is best if the player uses the word "provisional" in his or her announcement. However, other statements that make it clear that the player's intent is to play a provisional ball are acceptable.

Examples of announcements that clearly indicate the player is playing a provisional ball include:

  • "I'm playing a ball under Rule 18.3".
  • "I'm going to play another just in case".

Examples of announcements that do not clearly indicate the player is playing a provisional ball and mean that the player would be putting a ball into play under stroke and distance include:

  • "I'm going to re-load".
  • "I'm going to play another".
18.3c
Jouer une balle provisoire jusqu'à ce qu'elle devienne la balle en jeu ou qu'elle soit abandonnée
18.3c(1)/1
Actions Taken with Provisional Ball Are a Continuation of Provisional Ball

Taking actions other than a stroke with a provisional ball, such as dropping, placing or substituting another ball nearer to the hole than where the original ball is estimated to be are not "playing" the provisional ball and do not cause that ball to lose its status as a provisional ball.

For example, a player's tee shot may be lost 175 yards from the hole, so he or she plays a provisional ball. After briefly searching for the original ball, the player goes forward to play the provisional ball that is in a bush 150 yards from the hole. He or she decides the provisional ball is unplayable and drops it under Rule 19.2c. Before playing the dropped ball, the player's original ball is found by a spectator within three minutes of when the player started the search.

In this case, the original ball remained the ball in play because it was found within three minutes of beginning the search and the player had not made a stroke at the provisional ball from a spot nearer the hole than where the original ball was estimated to be.

18.3c(2)/1
Estimated Spot of the Original Ball Is Used to Determine Which Ball Is in Play

Rule 18.3c(2) uses the spot where the player "estimates" his or her original ball to be when determining whether the provisional ball has been played from nearer the hole than that spot, and whether the original or provisional ball is in play. The estimated spot is not where the original ball ends up being found. Rather, it is the spot the player reasonably thinks or assumes that ball to be.

Examples of determining which ball is in play include:

  • A player, believing that his or her original ball might be lost or out of bounds, plays a provisional ball that does not come to rest nearer the hole than the estimated spot of the original ball. The player finds a ball and plays it, believing it was the original ball. The player then discovers that the ball that was played was the provisional ball.
    In this case, the provisional ball was not played from a spot nearer the hole than the estimated spot of the original ball. Therefore, the player may resume searching for the original ball. If the original ball is found within three minutes of starting the search, it remains the ball in play and the player must abandon the provisional ball. If the three-minute search time expires before the original ball is found, the provisional ball is the ball in play.
  • A player, believing his or her tee shot might be lost or over a road defined as out of bounds, plays a provisional ball. The player searches for the original ball briefly but does not find it. The player goes forward and plays the provisional ball from a spot nearer the hole than where the original ball was estimated to be. Then the player goes forward and finds the original ball in bounds. The original ball must have bounced down the road and then come back in bounds, because it was found much farther forward than anticipated.
    In this case, the provisional ball became the ball in play when it was played from a spot nearer the hole than where the original ball was estimated to be. The original ball is no longer in play and must be abandoned.
18.3c(2)/2
Player May Ask Others Not to Search for His or Her Original Ball

If a player does not plan to search for his or her original ball because he or she would prefer to continue play with a provisional ball, the player may ask others not to search, but there is no obligation for them to comply.

If a ball is found, the player must make all reasonable efforts to identify the ball, provided he or she has not already played the provisional ball from nearer the hole than where the original ball was estimated to be, in which case it became the player's ball in play. If the provisional ball has not yet become the ball in play when another ball is found, refusal to make a reasonable effort to identify the found ball may be considered serious misconduct contrary to the spirit of the game (Rule 1.2a).

After the other ball is found, if the provisional ball is played from nearer the hole than where the other ball was found, and it turns out that the other ball was the player's original ball, the stroke at the provisional ball was actually a stroke at a wrong ball (Rule 6.3c). The player will get the general penalty and, in stroke play, must correct the error by continuing play with the original ball.

18.3c(2)/3
Opponent or Another Player May Search for Player’s Ball Despite the Player’s Request

Even if a player prefers to continue play of the hole with a provisional ball without searching for the original ball, the opponent or another player in stroke play may search for the player's original ball so long as it does not unreasonably delay play. If the player's original ball is found while it is still in play, the player must abandon the provisional ball (Rule 18.3c(3)).

For example, at a par-3 hole, a player's tee shot goes into dense woods, and he or she plays a provisional ball that comes to rest near the hole. Given this outcome, the player does not wish to find the original ball and walks directly towards the provisional ball to continue play with it. The player's opponent or another player in stroke play believes it would be beneficial to him or her if the original ball was found, so he or she begins searching for it.

If he or she finds the original ball before the player makes another stroke with the provisional ball the player must abandon the provisional ball and continue with the original ball. However, if the player makes another stroke with the provisional ball before the original ball is found, it becomes the ball in play because it was nearer the hole than the estimated spot of the original ball (Rule 18.3c(2)).

In match play, if the player's provisional ball is nearer the hole than the opponent's ball, the opponent may cancel the stroke and have the player play in the proper order (Rule 6.4a). However, cancelling the stroke would not change the status of the original ball, which is no longer in play.

18.3c(2)/4
When Score with Holed Provisional Ball Becomes the Score for Hole

So long as the original ball has not already been found in bounds, the score with a provisional ball that has been holed becomes the player's score for the hole when the player lifts the ball from the hole since, in this case, lifting the ball from the hole is the same as making a stroke.

For example, at a short hole, Player A's tee shot might be lost, so he or she plays a provisional ball that is holed. Player A does not wish to look for the original ball, but Player B, Player A's opponent or another player in stroke play, goes to look for the original ball.

If Player B finds Player A's original ball before Player A lifts the provisional ball from the hole, Player A must abandon the provisional ball and continue with the original ball. If Player A lifts the ball from the hole before Player B finds Player A's original ball, Player A's score for the hole is three.

18.3c(2)/5
Provisional Ball Lifted by Player Subsequently Becomes the Ball in Play

If a player lifts his or her provisional ball when not allowed to do so under the Rules, and the provisional ball subsequently becomes the ball in play, the player must add one penalty stroke under Rule 9.4b (Penalty for Lifting or Moving Ball) and must replace the ball.

For example, in stroke play, believing his or her tee shot might be lost, the player plays a provisional ball. The player finds a ball that he or she believes is the original ball, makes a stroke at it, picks up the provisional ball, and then discovers that the ball he or she played was not the original ball, but a wrong ball. The player resumes search for the original ball but cannot find it within the three-minute search time.

Since the provisional ball became the ball in play under penalty of stroke and distance, the player is required to replace that ball and gets one penalty stroke under Rule 9.4b. The player also gets two penalty strokes for playing a wrong ball (Rule 6.3c). The player's next stroke is his or her seventh.

18.3c(3)/1
Provisional Ball Cannot Serve as Ball in Play if Original Ball Is Unplayable or in Penalty Area

A player is only allowed to play a provisional ball if he or she believes the original ball might be lost outside a penalty area or might be out of bounds. The player may not decide that a second ball he or she is going to play is both a provisional ball in case the original ball is lost outside a penalty area or out of bounds and the ball in play in case the original ball is unplayable or in a penalty area.

If the original ball is found in bounds or is known or virtually certain to be in a penalty area, the provisional ball must be abandoned.

Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

Zone générale

La zone du parcours qui comprend toutes les parties du parcours sauf les quatre autres zones spécifiquement définies : (1) la zone de départ d'où le joueur doit jouer en commençant le trou qu'il joue, (2) toutes les zones à pénalité, (3) tous les bunkers, et (4) le green du trou que le joueur joue.

La zone générale inclut :

  • Tous les emplacements de départ sur le parcours autres que la zone de départ, et
  • Tous les mauvais greens
Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
Mauvaise balle

Toute balle autre que :

  • La balle en jeu du joueur (que ce soit la balle d'origine ou une balle substituée),
  • La balle provisoire du joueur (avant qu'elle ne soit abandonnée selon la Règle 18.3c), ou
  • En stroke play, votre seconde balle jouée selon les Règles 14.7b ou 20.1c.

Exemples d'une mauvaise balle :

  • La balle en jeu d'un autre joueur.
  • Une balle abandonnée.
  • La propre balle du joueur qui est hors limites, qui est devenue perdue ou qui a été relevée et pas encore remise en jeu.

 

Interpretation Wrong Ball/1 - Part of Wrong Ball Is Still Wrong Ball

If a player makes a stroke at part of a stray ball that he or she mistakenly thought was the ball in play, he or she has made a stroke at a wrong ball and Rule 6.3c applies.

Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Mauvaise balle

Toute balle autre que :

  • La balle en jeu du joueur (que ce soit la balle d'origine ou une balle substituée),
  • La balle provisoire du joueur (avant qu'elle ne soit abandonnée selon la Règle 18.3c), ou
  • En stroke play, votre seconde balle jouée selon les Règles 14.7b ou 20.1c.

Exemples d'une mauvaise balle :

  • La balle en jeu d'un autre joueur.
  • Une balle abandonnée.
  • La propre balle du joueur qui est hors limites, qui est devenue perdue ou qui a été relevée et pas encore remise en jeu.

 

Interpretation Wrong Ball/1 - Part of Wrong Ball Is Still Wrong Ball

If a player makes a stroke at part of a stray ball that he or she mistakenly thought was the ball in play, he or she has made a stroke at a wrong ball and Rule 6.3c applies.

Mauvaise balle

Toute balle autre que :

  • La balle en jeu du joueur (que ce soit la balle d'origine ou une balle substituée),
  • La balle provisoire du joueur (avant qu'elle ne soit abandonnée selon la Règle 18.3c), ou
  • En stroke play, votre seconde balle jouée selon les Règles 14.7b ou 20.1c.

Exemples d'une mauvaise balle :

  • La balle en jeu d'un autre joueur.
  • Une balle abandonnée.
  • La propre balle du joueur qui est hors limites, qui est devenue perdue ou qui a été relevée et pas encore remise en jeu.

 

Interpretation Wrong Ball/1 - Part of Wrong Ball Is Still Wrong Ball

If a player makes a stroke at part of a stray ball that he or she mistakenly thought was the ball in play, he or she has made a stroke at a wrong ball and Rule 6.3c applies.

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Cadet

Quelqu'un qui aide un joueur pendant un tour, y compris de la façon suivante :

  • Porter, transporter ou manipuler les clubs : une personne qui porte, transporte (par ex. avec une voiturette ou un chariot) ou manipule les clubs d'un joueur pendant le jeu est le cadet du joueur, même si elle n'est pas désignée nommément comme cadet par le joueur, sauf quand de telles actions sont faites pour écarter du jeu les clubs, le sac ou le chariot du joueur ou par courtoisie (par ex. en récupérant un club que le joueur a laissé derrière lui).
  • Donner un conseil : le cadet d'un joueur est la seule personne (autre qu'un partenaire ou le cadet d'un partenaire) à qui un joueur peut demander un conseil

Un cadet peut également aider le joueur par d'autres moyens autorisés par les Règles (voir Règle 10.3b).

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Eau temporaire

Toute accumulation temporaire d'eau à la surface du sol (comme des flaques provenant de la pluie ou d'irrigation ou d'un débordement d'une étendue d'eau) qui :

  • N'est pas dans une zone à pénalité, et
  • Est visible avant que le joueur ne prenne son stance ou après qu'il l'a pris (sans appuyer excessivement avec ses pieds).

Il ne suffit pas que le sol soit simplement humide, boueux ou mou ou que l'eau soit momentanément visible lorsque le joueur marche sur le sol ; une accumulation d'eau doit rester présente avant que le stance ne soit pris ou après.

Cas spéciaux :

  • La rosée et le givre ne sont pas de l'eau temporaire.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont, au choix du joueur, soit des détritus, soit, lorsqu'elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • La glace manufacturée est une obstruction.
Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
Forces naturelles

Les effets de la nature tels que le vent, l'eau ou quand quelque chose se passe sans raison apparente du fait des effets de la gravité.

Influence Extérieure

N'importe laquelle de ces personnes ou de ces choses qui peuvent affecter ce qui arrive à la balle d'un joueur ou à son équipement ou au parcours :

  • Toute personne (y compris un autre joueur), sauf le joueur ou son cadet ou son partenaire ou son adversaire ou l'un de leurs cadets,
  • Tout animal, et
  • Tout élément naturel ou artificiel ou autre chose (y compris une autre balle en mouvement), sauf des forces naturelles.

 

Interpretation Outside Influence/1 - Status of Air and Water When Artificially Propelled

Although wind and water are natural forces and not outside influences, artificially propelled air and water are outside influences.

Examples include:

  • If a ball at rest on the putting green has not been lifted and replaced and is moved by air from a greenside fan, the ball must be replaced (Rule 9.6 and Rule 14.2).
  • If a ball at rest is moved by water coming from an irrigation system, the ball must be replaced (Rule 9.6 and Rule 14.2).
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Zone générale

La zone du parcours qui comprend toutes les parties du parcours sauf les quatre autres zones spécifiquement définies : (1) la zone de départ d'où le joueur doit jouer en commençant le trou qu'il joue, (2) toutes les zones à pénalité, (3) tous les bunkers, et (4) le green du trou que le joueur joue.

La zone générale inclut :

  • Tous les emplacements de départ sur le parcours autres que la zone de départ, et
  • Tous les mauvais greens
Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Substituer

Changer la balle que le joueur utilise pour jouer un trou en utilisant une autre balle qui devient la balle en jeu.

Le joueur a substitué une autre balle lorsqu'il met en jeu, d'une manière quelconque (voir Règle 14.4), cette balle au lieu de sa balle d'origine, que la balle d'origine ait été :

  • En jeu, ou
  • Plus en jeu parce qu'elle avait été relevée du parcours ou était perdue ou hors limites.

Une balle substituée est la balle en jeu du joueur même si :

  • Elle a été replacée, droppée ou placée d'une mauvaise manière ou à un mauvais endroit, ou
  • Le joueur était tenu selon les Règles de remettre la balle d'origine en jeu plutôt que de substituer une autre balle.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Substituer

Changer la balle que le joueur utilise pour jouer un trou en utilisant une autre balle qui devient la balle en jeu.

Le joueur a substitué une autre balle lorsqu'il met en jeu, d'une manière quelconque (voir Règle 14.4), cette balle au lieu de sa balle d'origine, que la balle d'origine ait été :

  • En jeu, ou
  • Plus en jeu parce qu'elle avait été relevée du parcours ou était perdue ou hors limites.

Une balle substituée est la balle en jeu du joueur même si :

  • Elle a été replacée, droppée ou placée d'une mauvaise manière ou à un mauvais endroit, ou
  • Le joueur était tenu selon les Règles de remettre la balle d'origine en jeu plutôt que de substituer une autre balle.
Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Mauvaise balle

Toute balle autre que :

  • La balle en jeu du joueur (que ce soit la balle d'origine ou une balle substituée),
  • La balle provisoire du joueur (avant qu'elle ne soit abandonnée selon la Règle 18.3c), ou
  • En stroke play, votre seconde balle jouée selon les Règles 14.7b ou 20.1c.

Exemples d'une mauvaise balle :

  • La balle en jeu d'un autre joueur.
  • Une balle abandonnée.
  • La propre balle du joueur qui est hors limites, qui est devenue perdue ou qui a été relevée et pas encore remise en jeu.

 

Interpretation Wrong Ball/1 - Part of Wrong Ball Is Still Wrong Ball

If a player makes a stroke at part of a stray ball that he or she mistakenly thought was the ball in play, he or she has made a stroke at a wrong ball and Rule 6.3c applies.

Pénalité générale

Perte du trou en match play ou deux coups de pénalité en stroke play.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Match Play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp joue directement contre un adversaire ou un camp adverse dans un match en tête-à-tête, sur un ou plusieurs tours :

  • Un joueur ou un camp gagne un trou dans le match en finissant le trou avec le plus petit nombre de coups (à savoir les coups joués et les coups de pénalité), et
  • Le match est gagné lorsqu'un joueur ou un camp mène l'adversaire ou le camp adverse par plus de trous qu'il n'en reste à jouer.

Un match play peut être joué comme un match en simple (dans lequel un joueur joue directement contre un adversaire), un match à Trois balles ou bien un match en Foursome ou à Quatre balles entre des camps de deux partenaires.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Trou

Le point d'arrivée sur le green pour le trou joué.

  • Le trou doit avoir 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces) de diamètre et au moins 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de profondeur.
  • Si une gaine est utilisée, son diamètre extérieur ne doit pas dépasser 108 mm (4 ¼ pouces). La gaine doit être enfoncée d'au moins 25,4 mm (1 pouce) au dessous de la surface du green, à moins que la nature du sol impose qu'elle soit plus près de la surface.

Le mot "trou" (lorsqu'il n'est pas utilisé en tant que définition en italique) est utilisé dans les Règles pour désigner la partie du parcours associée à une zone de départ, un green et un trou particuliers. Le jeu d'un trou commence à partir de la zone de départ et finit lorsque la balle est entrée sur le green (ou lorsque les Règles disent autrement que le trou est fini).

 

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Mauvaise balle

Toute balle autre que :

  • La balle en jeu du joueur (que ce soit la balle d'origine ou une balle substituée),
  • La balle provisoire du joueur (avant qu'elle ne soit abandonnée selon la Règle 18.3c), ou
  • En stroke play, votre seconde balle jouée selon les Règles 14.7b ou 20.1c.

Exemples d'une mauvaise balle :

  • La balle en jeu d'un autre joueur.
  • Une balle abandonnée.
  • La propre balle du joueur qui est hors limites, qui est devenue perdue ou qui a été relevée et pas encore remise en jeu.

 

Interpretation Wrong Ball/1 - Part of Wrong Ball Is Still Wrong Ball

If a player makes a stroke at part of a stray ball that he or she mistakenly thought was the ball in play, he or she has made a stroke at a wrong ball and Rule 6.3c applies.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Coup et distance

La procédure et la pénalité encourue lorsqu'un joueur prend un dégagement selon les Règles 17, 18 ou 19 en jouant une balle de l'endroit où le coup précédent a été joué (voir Règle 14.6)

Le terme coup et distance signifie qu'à la fois le joueur :

  • Encourt un coup de pénalité, et
  • Perd le bénéfice de tout gain de distance vers le trou obtenu depuis l'emplacement où son coupprécédent a été joué.
Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Mauvaise balle

Toute balle autre que :

  • La balle en jeu du joueur (que ce soit la balle d'origine ou une balle substituée),
  • La balle provisoire du joueur (avant qu'elle ne soit abandonnée selon la Règle 18.3c), ou
  • En stroke play, votre seconde balle jouée selon les Règles 14.7b ou 20.1c.

Exemples d'une mauvaise balle :

  • La balle en jeu d'un autre joueur.
  • Une balle abandonnée.
  • La propre balle du joueur qui est hors limites, qui est devenue perdue ou qui a été relevée et pas encore remise en jeu.

 

Interpretation Wrong Ball/1 - Part of Wrong Ball Is Still Wrong Ball

If a player makes a stroke at part of a stray ball that he or she mistakenly thought was the ball in play, he or she has made a stroke at a wrong ball and Rule 6.3c applies.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Sûr ou quasiment certain

La norme pour décider ce qui est arrivé à la balle d'un joueur – pour déterminer par exemple, si la balle repose dans une zone à pénalité, si la balle s'est déplacée ou ce qui a causé son déplacement.

Sûr ou quasiment certain signifie plus que "possible" ou "probable". Cela veut dire que :

  • Soit il y a des preuves convaincantes que le fait en question s'est bien produit sur la balle du joueur, par ex. lorsque le joueur ou d'autres témoins ont vu cela se produire,
  • Soit il y a un très petit pourcentage de doute, toutes les informations raisonnablement disponibles montrant qu'il y a une probabilité d'au moins 95% que le fait en question se soit produit.

L'expression “toutes les informations raisonnablement disponibles“ recouvre toutes les informations dont le joueur a connaissance ainsi que toutes les autres informations qu'il peut obtenir de façon raisonnable et sans retard déraisonnable

 

Interpretation Known or Virtually Certain/1 - Applying “Known or Virtually Certain“ Standard When Ball Moves

When it is not “known“ what caused the ball to move, all reasonably available information must be considered and the evidence must be evaluated to determine if it is “virtually certain“ that the player, opponent or outside influence caused the ball to move.

Depending on the circumstances, reasonably available information may include, but is not limited to:

  • The effect of any actions taken near the ball (such as movement of loose impediments, practice swings, grounding club and taking a stance),
  • Time elapsed between such actions and the movement of the ball,
  • The lie of the ball before it moved (such as on a fairway, perched on longer grass, on a surface imperfection or on the putting green),
  • The conditions of the ground near the ball (such as the degree of slope or presence of surface irregularities, etc), and
  • Wind speed and direction, rain and other weather conditions.

Interpretation Known or Virtually Certain/2 - Virtual Certainty Is Irrelevant if It Comes to Light After Three-Minute Search Expires

Determining whether there is knowledge or virtual certainty must be based on evidence known to the player at the time the three-minute search time expires.

Examples of when the player's later findings are irrelevant include when:

  • A player's tee shot comes to rest in an area containing heavy rough and a large animal hole. After a three-minute search, it is determined that it is not known or virtually certain that the ball is in the animal hole. As the player returns to the teeing area, the ball is found in the animal hole.
  • Even though the player has not yet put another ball in play, the player must take stroke-and-distance relief for a lost ball (Rule 18.2b - What to Do When Ball is Lost or Out of Bounds) since it was not known or virtually certain that the ball was in the animal hole, when the search time expired.
  • A player cannot find his or her ball and believes it may have been picked up by a spectator (outside influence), but there is not enough evidence to be virtually certain of this. A short time after the three-minute search time expires, a spectator is found to have the player's ball.

The player must take stroke-and-distance relief for a lost ball (Rule 18.2b) since the movement by the outside influence only became known after the search time expired.

Interpretation Known or Virtually Certain/3 - Player Unaware Ball Played by Another Player

It must be known or virtually certain that a player's ball has been played by another player as a wrong ball to treat it as being moved.

For example, in stroke play, Player A and Player B hit their tee shots into the same general location. Player A finds a ball and plays it. Player B goes forward to look for his or her ball and cannot find it. After three minutes, Player B starts back to the tee to play another ball. On the way, Player B finds Player A's ball and knows then that Player A has played his or her ball in error.

Player A gets the general penalty for playing a wrong ball and must then play his or her own ball (Rule 6.3c). Player A's ball was not lost even though both players searched for more than three minutes because Player A did not start searching for his or her ball; the searching was for Player B's ball. Regarding Player B's ball, Player B's original ball was lost and he or she must put another ball in play under penalty of stroke and distance (Rule 18.2b), because it was not known or virtually certain when the three-minute search time expired that the ball had been played by another player.

Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.