The R&A - Working for Golf
Résoudre les problèmes de Règles pendant un tour ; décisions d'un arbitre et du Comité
Aller à la Section
20.1
20.1b
20.1b(2)/1
20.1b(2)/2
20.1b(4)/1
20.1c
20.1c(3)/1
20.1c(3)/2
20.1c(3)/3
20.1c(3)/4
20.1c(3)/5
20.1c(3)/6
20.1c(3)/7
20.2
20.2d
20.2d/1
20.2d/2
20.2e
20.2e/1

Objet de la Règle : La Règle 20 traite de ce que les joueurs devraient faire lorsqu'ils ont des questions sur les Règles pendant un tour, y compris sur les procédures (qui diffèrent en match play et en stroke play) permettant à un joueur de protéger son droit d'obtenir une décision ultérieurement.

La Règle traite également du rôle des arbitres qui sont autorisés à résoudre des questions de fait et à faire appliquer les Règles. Les décisions d'un arbitre ou du Comité s'imposent à tous les joueurs.

20.1
Résoudre les problèmes de Règles pendant un tour
20.1b
Problèmes de Règles en match play
20.1b(2)/1
Request for Ruling Must Be Made in Time

A player is entitled to know the status of his or her match at all times or that a ruling request will be settled later in the match. A request for a ruling must be made in time to prevent a player from trying to apply penalties later in the match. Whether a ruling will be given depends on when the player becomes aware of the facts (not when he or she learned that something was a penalty) and when the request for a ruling was made.

For example, during the first hole of a match without a referee, Player A properly lifts his or her ball to check for damage under Rule 4.2c(1), determines that it is cut and substitutes a new ball under Rule 4.2c(2). Unknown to Player A, Player B sees the condition of the original ball and privately disagrees with Player A's assessment. However, Player B decides to overlook the possible breach and says nothing to Player A. Both players hole out and play from the next teeing area.

At the conclusion of the final hole, Player A is the winner of the match, 1up. Walking off the putting green, when the Committee is readily available, Player B changes his or her mind and tells Player A that he or she disagrees with the substitution that Player A made on the first hole and is making a request to the Committee for a ruling.

The Committee should determine that the ruling request by Player B was not made in time as Player B was aware of the facts during play of the first hole and, subsequently, a stroke was made on the second hole (Rule 20.1b(2)). Therefore, the Committee should decide that no ruling will be given.

The match stands as played with Player A as the winner.

20.1b(2)/2
Ruling Made After Completion of the Final Hole of the Match but Before the Result of the Match Is Final May Result in Players Resuming the Match

If a player becomes aware of a possible breach of the Rules by his or her opponent after completing what they thought was the final hole of the match, the player may make a request for a ruling. If the opponent was in breach of the Rules, the adjusted match score may require that the players return to the course to resume the match.

For example:

  • In a match between Player A and Player B, Player B wins by a score of 5 and 4. On the way back to the clubhouse and before the result of the match is final, it is discovered that Player B had 15 clubs in his or her bag. Player A requests a ruling, and the Committee determines correctly that the ruling request by Player A was made in time. The players must return to the 15th hole and resume the match. The score in the match is adjusted by deducting two holes from Player B (Rule 4.1b(4)), and Player B is now 3 up with four holes to play.
  • In a match between Player A and Player B, Player B wins by a score of 3 and 2. On the way back to the clubhouse, Player A discovers that Player B hit the sand with a practice swing in a bunker on the 14th hole. Player B had won the 14th hole. Player A requests a ruling, and the Committee determines correctly that the ruling request by Player A was made in time, and that Player B lost the 14th hole for failing to tell Player A about the penalty (Rule 3.2d(2)). The players must return to the 17th hole and resume the match. As the score in the match is adjusted by changing Player B's win of the 14th hole to a loss of hole, Player B is now 1 up with two holes to play.
20.1b(4)/1
Playing Out Hole with Two Balls Is Not Allowed in Match Play

The playing of two balls is limited to stroke play because, when a match is being played, any incidents in that match concern only the players involved in it and the players in the match can protect their own interests.

However, if a player in a match is uncertain about the right procedure and plays out the hole with two balls, the score with the original ball always counts if the player and opponent refer the situation to the Committee and the opponent has not objected to the player playing the second ball.

However, if the opponent objects to the player playing a second ball and makes a ruling request in time (Rule 20.1b(2)), the player loses the hole for playing a wrong ball in breach of Rule 6.3c(1).

20.1c
Problèmes de Règles en stroke play
20.1c(3)/1
No Penalty for Playing a Ball That Was Not in Play When Two Balls Are Being Played

When a player is uncertain of what to do and decides to play two balls, he or she gets no penalty if one of the balls played was his or her original ball that is no longer in play.

For example, a player's ball is not found in a penalty area after a three-minute search, so the player properly takes relief from the penalty area under Rule 17.1c and plays a substituted ball. Then, the original ball is found in the penalty area. Not sure what to do, the player decides to play the original ball as a second ball before making any further strokes, and chooses to score with the original ball. The player holes out with both balls.

The ball played under Rule 17.1c became the ball in play and the score with that ball is the player's score for the hole. The score with the original ball could not count because the original ball was no longer in play. However, the player gets no penalty for playing the original ball as a second ball.

20.1c(3)/2
Player Must Decide to Play Two Balls Before Making Another Stroke

Rule 20.1c(3) requires a player to decide to play two balls before making a stroke so that his or her decision to play two balls or the choice of which ball to count is not influenced by the result of the ball just played. Dropping a ball is not equivalent to making a stroke.

Examples of the application of that requirement include:

  • A player's ball comes to rest on a paved cart path in the general area. In taking relief, the player lifts the ball, drops it outside the required relief area and plays it. The player's marker questions the drop and advises the player that he or she may have played from a wrong place.
    Uncertain what to do, the player would like to complete the hole with two balls. However, it is too late to use Rule 20.1c(3) since a stroke has already been made and the player must add the general penalty for playing from a wrong place (Rule 14.7). If the player believes this may be a serious breach of playing from a wrong place, the player should play a second ball under Rule 14.7 to avoid possible disqualification.
    If the player's marker questioned the drop before the player made a stroke at the ball and he or she was uncertain what to do, the player could have completed the hole with two balls under Rule 20.1c(3).
  • A player's ball lies in a penalty area defined by red stakes. One of the stakes interferes with the player's intended swing and the player is uncertain if he or she is allowed to remove the stake. The player makes his or her next stroke without removing a stake.
    At this point, the player decides to play a second ball with the stake removed and get a ruling from the Committee. The Committee should rule that the score with the original ball is the score that counts since the uncertain situation arose when the ball was in the penalty area with interference from the stake, and the player had to make the decision to play two balls before making a stroke at the original ball.
20.1c(3)/3
Player May Lift Original Ball and Drop, Place or Replace It When Playing Two Balls

Rule 20.1c(3) does not require the original ball to be the ball that is played as it lies. Typically, the original ball is played as it lies, and the second ball is put in play under whatever Rule is being used. However, putting the original ball in play under the Rule is also allowed.

For example, if a player is uncertain whether his or her ball lies in an abnormal course condition in the general area, the player may decide to play two balls. The player may then take relief under Rule 16.1b (Relief from Abnormal Course Condition) by lifting, dropping and playing the original ball and then continuing by placing a second ball where the original ball lay in the questionable area and playing it from there.

In such a case, the player does not need to mark the spot of the original ball before lifting it, although it is recommended that this is done.

20.1c(3)/4
Order of Playing the Original Ball and Second Ball Is Interchangeable

When a player is uncertain about the right procedure and wants to complete the hole with two balls, the Rules do not require that the original ball be played first, followed by the second ball. The balls may be played in any order the player decides.

For example, uncertain what to do, a player decides to complete the hole with two balls and chooses to score with the second ball. The player may choose to play the second ball before the original ball and may alternate making strokes with the original and second ball in completing play of the hole.

20.1c(3)/5
Player’s Obligation to Complete Hole with Second Ball After Announcing Intention to Do So and Choosing Which Ball Should Count

After a player has announced his or her intention to play two balls under Rule 20.1c(3) and has either put a ball in play or made a stroke at one of the balls, the player is committed to the procedure in Rule 20.1c(3). If the player does not play, or does not hole out with, one of the balls and that ball is the one the Committee rules would have counted, the player is disqualified for failing to hole out (Rule 3.3c - Failure to Hole Out). However, there is no penalty if the player does not hole out a ball that will not count.

For example, a player's ball lies in a rut made by a vehicle. Believing that the area should have been marked as ground under repair, the player decides to play two balls and announces that he or she would like the second ball to count. The player then makes a stroke at the original ball from the rut. After seeing the results of this stroke, the player decides not to play a second ball. Upon completion of the round, the facts are reported to the Committee.

If the Committee decides that the rut is ground under repair, the player is disqualified for failing to hole out with the second ball (Rule 3.3c).

However, if the Committee decides that the rut is not ground under repair, the player's score with the original ball counts and he or she gets no penalty for not playing a second ball.

The result would be the same for a player who made a stroke or strokes with a second ball but picked it up before completing play of the hole.

20.1c(3)/6
Provisional Ball Must Be Used as Second Ball When Uncertain

Although Rule 20.1c(3) states that a second ball played under this Rule is not the same as a provisional ball under Rule 18.3 (Provisional Ball), the reverse is not true. In deciding to play two balls after playing a provisional ball and being uncertain whether the original ball is out of bounds or lost outside a penalty area, the player must treat the provisional ball as the second ball.

Examples of using a provisional ball as a second ball include when:

  • The player is unsure whether his or her original ball is out of bounds, so he or she completes the hole with the original ball and the provisional ball.
  • The player has knowledge or virtual certainty that his or her original ball that has not been found is in an abnormal course condition and is unsure what to do, so he or she completes the hole with the provisional ball and a second ball with relief under Rule 16.1e.
20.1c(3)/7
Player Allowed to Play One Ball Under Two Different Rules

When a player is uncertain about the right procedure, it is recommended that he or she play two balls under Rule 20.1c(3). However, there is nothing that prevents the player from playing one ball under two different Rules and requesting a ruling before returning his or her scorecard.

For example, a player's ball comes to rest in an unplayable spot in an area that he or she believes should be ground under repair, but is not marked. Uncertain what to do and willing to accept the one-stroke penalty if it is not ground under repair, the player decides to use one ball and drop it in the relief area allowed for taking relief from ground under repair (Rule 16.1) and simultaneously in part of the relief area allowed for taking unplayable ball relief (Rule 19.2) for one penalty stroke.

If the Committee decides that the area is ground under repair, the player does not get a penalty for taking unplayable ball relief. If the Committee decides that the area is not ground under repair, the player gets one penalty stroke for taking unplayable ball relief.

If the player used the procedure outlined above and the ball came to rest at a spot where there is interference from the condition (required to drop again for Rule 16.1 but not for Rule 19.2), he or she should get help from the Committee or play two balls under Rule 20.1c(3).

20.2
Décisions relatives aux problèmes de Règles
20.2d
Correction d'une décision erronée
20.2d/1
A Wrong Ruling Is Different from an Administrative Mistake

There are limits on when a wrong ruling may be corrected, but there is no time limit for correcting an administrative mistake.

A wrong ruling has occurred when a referee or the Committee has attempted to apply the Rules to a situation but has done so incorrectly, for example, by:

  • Misinterpreting or misunderstanding a Rule,
  • Failing to apply a Rule, or
  • Applying a Rule that was not applicable or does not exist.

This can be distinguished from an administrative mistake when a referee or the Committee has made a procedural error in relation to the administration of the competition, for example, by:

  • Miscalculating the result of a tie, or
  • Applying a player's full handicap strokes in a stroke-play competition when only a percentage should be applied.
20.2d/2
Administrative Errors Should Always Be Corrected

The time frame in Rule 20.2d, which deals with penalties, does not apply to administrative mistakes by the Committee. There is no time limit for correcting administrative mistakes.

For example, there is no time limit in correcting:

  • A handicap that was miscalculated by the Committee causing another player to win the competition.
  • A prize that was given to the wrong player after the Committee failed to post the winner's score.
20.2e
Disqualification de joueurs après l'annonce du résultat définitif du match ou de la compétition
20.2e/1
Player Found to Be Ineligible During Competition or After Result of Match or Competition Is Final

There is no time limit on correcting the results of a competition when a player who has competed in the competition is found to be ineligible.

For example, if it is discovered that a player has played in a competition with a maximum age and the player was over that age, or a player has played in a competition restricted to amateur golfers when the player was not an amateur, the player was ineligible.

In these circumstances, the player is treated as if he or she had not entered the competition, as opposed to being disqualified from the competition, and the scores or the results are amended accordingly.

Arbitre

Officiel nommé par le Comité pour résoudre des questions de fait et faire appliquer les Règles.

Voir Procédures pour  le Comité, Section 6C (expliquant les responsabilités et les pouvoirs d'un arbitre).

Substituer

Changer la balle que le joueur utilise pour jouer un trou en utilisant une autre balle qui devient la balle en jeu.

Le joueur a substitué une autre balle lorsqu'il met en jeu, d'une manière quelconque (voir Règle 14.4), cette balle au lieu de sa balle d'origine, que la balle d'origine ait été :

  • En jeu, ou
  • Plus en jeu parce qu'elle avait été relevée du parcours ou était perdue ou hors limites.

Une balle substituée est la balle en jeu du joueur même si :

  • Elle a été replacée, droppée ou placée d'une mauvaise manière ou à un mauvais endroit, ou
  • Le joueur était tenu selon les Règles de remettre la balle d'origine en jeu plutôt que de substituer une autre balle.
Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Substituer

Changer la balle que le joueur utilise pour jouer un trou en utilisant une autre balle qui devient la balle en jeu.

Le joueur a substitué une autre balle lorsqu'il met en jeu, d'une manière quelconque (voir Règle 14.4), cette balle au lieu de sa balle d'origine, que la balle d'origine ait été :

  • En jeu, ou
  • Plus en jeu parce qu'elle avait été relevée du parcours ou était perdue ou hors limites.

Une balle substituée est la balle en jeu du joueur même si :

  • Elle a été replacée, droppée ou placée d'une mauvaise manière ou à un mauvais endroit, ou
  • Le joueur était tenu selon les Règles de remettre la balle d'origine en jeu plutôt que de substituer une autre balle.
Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Bunker

Une zone de sable spécialement préparée, qui est souvent un creux d'où le gazon ou la terre ont été enlevés.

Ne font pas partie d'un bunker :

  • Une lèvre, un mur ou une face, en lisière de la zone préparée, constitués de terre, d'herbe, de mottes de gazon empilées ou de matériaux artificiels,
  • La terre ou tout élément naturel qui pousse ou est fixé à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée (par ex. de l'herbe, des buissons ou des arbres),
  • Du sable qui a débordé ou qui se trouve à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée, et
  • Toutes les autres zones de sable sur le parcours qui ne sont pas à l'intérieur de la lisière d'une zone préparée (comme les déserts et autres zones de sable naturelles ou des zones parfois appelées “waste areas“).

Les bunkers sont l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Un Comité peut définir une zone de sable préparée comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker) ou une zone de sable non préparée comme un bunker.

Quand un bunker est en réparation, le Comité peut définir la totalité du bunker comme un terrain en réparation. Il est alors traité comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker).

Le mot “sable“ utilisé dans cette Définition et dans la Règle 12 comprend tout matériau semblable au sable utilisé comme matériau de bunker (comme les coquillages broyés), ainsi que toute terre mélangée au sable.

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Mauvaise balle

Toute balle autre que :

  • La balle en jeu du joueur (que ce soit la balle d'origine ou une balle substituée),
  • La balle provisoire du joueur (avant qu'elle ne soit abandonnée selon la Règle 18.3c), ou
  • En stroke play, votre seconde balle jouée selon les Règles 14.7b ou 20.1c.

Exemples d'une mauvaise balle :

  • La balle en jeu d'un autre joueur.
  • Une balle abandonnée.
  • La propre balle du joueur qui est hors limites, qui est devenue perdue ou qui a été relevée et pas encore remise en jeu.

 

Interpretation Wrong Ball/1 - Part of Wrong Ball Is Still Wrong Ball

If a player makes a stroke at part of a stray ball that he or she mistakenly thought was the ball in play, he or she has made a stroke at a wrong ball and Rule 6.3c applies.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Substituer

Changer la balle que le joueur utilise pour jouer un trou en utilisant une autre balle qui devient la balle en jeu.

Le joueur a substitué une autre balle lorsqu'il met en jeu, d'une manière quelconque (voir Règle 14.4), cette balle au lieu de sa balle d'origine, que la balle d'origine ait été :

  • En jeu, ou
  • Plus en jeu parce qu'elle avait été relevée du parcours ou était perdue ou hors limites.

Une balle substituée est la balle en jeu du joueur même si :

  • Elle a été replacée, droppée ou placée d'une mauvaise manière ou à un mauvais endroit, ou
  • Le joueur était tenu selon les Règles de remettre la balle d'origine en jeu plutôt que de substituer une autre balle.
Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Zone générale

La zone du parcours qui comprend toutes les parties du parcours sauf les quatre autres zones spécifiquement définies : (1) la zone de départ d'où le joueur doit jouer en commençant le trou qu'il joue, (2) toutes les zones à pénalité, (3) tous les bunkers, et (4) le green du trou que le joueur joue.

La zone générale inclut :

  • Tous les emplacements de départ sur le parcours autres que la zone de départ, et
  • Tous les mauvais greens
Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Zone de dégagement

La zone dans laquelle un joueur doit dropper une balle en se dégageant selon une Règle. Chaque Règle de dégagement exige que le joueur utilise une zone de dégagement spécifique dont la taille et l'emplacement sont basés sur les trois facteurs suivants :

  • Le point de référence : le point à partir duquel la dimension de la zone de dégagement est mesurée.
  • La dimension de la zone de dégagement mesurée à partir du point de référence : la zone de dégagement est soit une, soit deux longueurs de club à partir du point de référence, mais avec certaines limites :
  • Les limites de l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement : l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement peut être limité d'une ou plusieurs façons, de sorte que, par exemple :
    • Cet emplacement ne soit que dans certaines zones du parcours spécifiquement définies, par ex. seulement dans la zone générale, ou pas dans un bunker ni dans une zone à pénalité,
    • Cet emplacement ne soit pas plus près du trou que le point de référence ou qu'il doive être à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité ou d'un bunker d'où le dégagement est pris, ou
    • Cet emplacement se situe à un endroit où il n'y a plus d'interférence (telle que définie dans la Règle particulière) de la condition pour laquelle le dégagement est pris.

En utilisant les longueurs de club pour déterminer la taille d'une zone de dégagement, le joueur peut mesurer directement à travers un fossé, un trou ou un élément similaire, et directement à travers un objet (comme un arbre, une clôture, un mur,un tunnel, un drain ou une tête d'arroseur) mais il n'est pas autorisé à mesurer à travers un sol qui est naturellement en pente montante ou descendante.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 2I (le Comité peut choisir d'autoriser ou d'exiger l'utilisation par le joueur d'une dropping zone en tant que zone de dégagement).


Clarification - Déterminer si la balle repose ou non dans la zone de dégagement.

Lorsqu’on cherche à déterminer si une balle est venue reposer à l’intérieur d’une zone de dégagement (par ex. à une ou deux longueurs de club du point de référence selon la Règle appliquée), la balle est dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle se trouve à l’intérieur de la mesure d’une ou deux longueurs de club. Cependant une balle n’est pas dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle est plus proche du trou que le point de référence ou si la condition à l’origine du dégagement gratuit interfère avec n’importe quelle partie de la balle.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Marqueur

En stroke play, la personne ayant la responsabilité d'enregistrer le score d'un joueur sur la carte de score du joueur et de certifier cette carte de score. Le marqueur peut être un autre joueur, mais pas un partenaire.

Le Comité peut désigner qui sera le marqueur du joueur ou dire aux joueurs comment ils peuvent choisir un marqueur.

Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Mauvais endroit

Tout endroit sur le parcours autre que celui où le joueur est requis ou autorisé à jouer sa balle selon les Règles.

Exemples de jeu d'un mauvais endroit :

  • Jouer une balle après l'avoir replacée à un mauvais emplacement, ou sans l'avoir replacée lorsque c'est exigé par les Règles.
  • Jouer une balle droppée reposant à l'extérieur de la zone de dégagement requise.
  • Se dégager selon une Règle inapplicable, la balle étant droppée et jouée d'un endroit non autorisé selon les Règles.
  • Jouer une balle d'une zone de jeu interdit ou lorsqu'une zone de jeu interdit interfère avec la zone du stance ou du swing intentionnels du joueur.

Jouer une balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ en commençant le jeu d'un trou ou en essayant de corriger cette erreur n'est pas jouer d'un mauvais endroit (voir Règle 6.1b).

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Pénalité générale

Perte du trou en match play ou deux coups de pénalité en stroke play.

Mauvais endroit

Tout endroit sur le parcours autre que celui où le joueur est requis ou autorisé à jouer sa balle selon les Règles.

Exemples de jeu d'un mauvais endroit :

  • Jouer une balle après l'avoir replacée à un mauvais emplacement, ou sans l'avoir replacée lorsque c'est exigé par les Règles.
  • Jouer une balle droppée reposant à l'extérieur de la zone de dégagement requise.
  • Se dégager selon une Règle inapplicable, la balle étant droppée et jouée d'un endroit non autorisé selon les Règles.
  • Jouer une balle d'une zone de jeu interdit ou lorsqu'une zone de jeu interdit interfère avec la zone du stance ou du swing intentionnels du joueur.

Jouer une balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ en commençant le jeu d'un trou ou en essayant de corriger cette erreur n'est pas jouer d'un mauvais endroit (voir Règle 6.1b).

Mauvais endroit

Tout endroit sur le parcours autre que celui où le joueur est requis ou autorisé à jouer sa balle selon les Règles.

Exemples de jeu d'un mauvais endroit :

  • Jouer une balle après l'avoir replacée à un mauvais emplacement, ou sans l'avoir replacée lorsque c'est exigé par les Règles.
  • Jouer une balle droppée reposant à l'extérieur de la zone de dégagement requise.
  • Se dégager selon une Règle inapplicable, la balle étant droppée et jouée d'un endroit non autorisé selon les Règles.
  • Jouer une balle d'une zone de jeu interdit ou lorsqu'une zone de jeu interdit interfère avec la zone du stance ou du swing intentionnels du joueur.

Jouer une balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ en commençant le jeu d'un trou ou en essayant de corriger cette erreur n'est pas jouer d'un mauvais endroit (voir Règle 6.1b).

Marqueur

En stroke play, la personne ayant la responsabilité d'enregistrer le score d'un joueur sur la carte de score du joueur et de certifier cette carte de score. Le marqueur peut être un autre joueur, mais pas un partenaire.

Le Comité peut désigner qui sera le marqueur du joueur ou dire aux joueurs comment ils peuvent choisir un marqueur.

Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Condition anormale du parcours

N'importe laquelle des quatre conditions suivantes spécifiquement définies :

  • Trou d'animal
  • Terrain en réparation
  • Obstruction inamovible, ou
  • Eau temporaire
Zone générale

La zone du parcours qui comprend toutes les parties du parcours sauf les quatre autres zones spécifiquement définies : (1) la zone de départ d'où le joueur doit jouer en commençant le trou qu'il joue, (2) toutes les zones à pénalité, (3) tous les bunkers, et (4) le green du trou que le joueur joue.

La zone générale inclut :

  • Tous les emplacements de départ sur le parcours autres que la zone de départ, et
  • Tous les mauvais greens
Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
En jeu (balle)

Le statut de la balle d'un joueur lorsqu'elle repose sur le parcours et est utilisée dans le jeu d'un trou :

  • Une balle devient initialement en jeu sur un trou :
    • Lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'intérieur de la zone de départ, ou
    • En match play, lorsque le joueur joue un coup sur la balle de l'extérieur de la zone de départ et que l'adversaire n'annule pas le coup selon la Règle 6.1b.
  • Cette balle reste en jeu jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit entrée, sauf qu'elle n'est plus en jeu :
    • Lorsqu'elle est relevée du parcours,
    • Lorsqu'elle est perdue (même si elle repose sur le parcours) ou repose hors limites, ou
    • Lorsqu'une autre balle lui a été substituée, même si ce n'est pas autorisé par une Règle.

Une balle qui n'est pas en jeu est une mauvaise balle.

Le joueur ne peut pas avoir plus d'une balle en jeu à tout moment. (Voir la Règle 6.3d pour les cas limités où un joueur peut jouer plus d'une balle en même temps sur un trou).

Lorsque les Règles font référence à une balle au repos ou en mouvement, cela signifie une balle qui est en jeu.

Lorsqu'un marque-balle est en place pour marquer l'emplacement d'une balle en jeu :

  • Si la balle n'a pas été relevée, elle est toujours en jeu, et
  • Si la balle a été relevée et replacée, elle est en jeu même si le marque-balle n'a pas été enlevé.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Terrain en réparation

Toute partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme étant terrain en réparation (soit en le marquant ou de toute autre façon). Tout terrain en réparation ainsi défini comprend à la fois :

  • Tout le sol à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, et
  • Toute herbe, buisson, arbre ou autre élément naturel, poussant ou fixé, enraciné dans la zone définie, y compris toute partie de ces éléments qui s'étend au dessus du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, mais pas toute partie (par ex. une racine d'arbre) qui est attachée au sol ou en-dessous du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie.

Le terrain en réparation inclut également les choses suivantes même si le Comité ne les définit pas comme tel :

  • Tout trou fait par le Comité ou le personnel d'entretien :
    • En préparant le parcours (par ex. un trou d'où un piquet a été enlevé ou un trou sur un green utilisé pour un autre trou, comme dans le cas d'un green double), ou
    • En entretenant le parcours (par ex. un trou fait en enlevant du gazon ou une souche d'arbre, en posant des canalisations, mais à l'exclusion des trous d'aération).
  • Du gazon coupé, des feuilles et tout autre matériau empilé pour être enlevés ultérieurement. Mais :
    • Tous les matériaux naturels qui sont empilés pour être enlevés, sont également des détritus, et
    • Tous les matériaux laissés sur le parcours et qui ne sont pas destinés à être enlevés ne sont pas terrain en réparation, sauf si le Comité les a définis comme tel.
  • Tout habitat animal (comme un nid d'un oiseau) qui se trouve si près de la balle d'un joueur que le coup ou le stance du joueur pourrait l'endommager, sauf lorsque l'habitat a été créé par des animaux définis comme des détritus (par ex. les vers ou les insectes).

La lisière du terrain en réparation devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par la ligne reliant les points à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur du terrain en réparation.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne de peinture sur le sol, la lisière du terrain en réparation est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans le terrain en réparation.
  • Éléments Physiques : lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (par ex.un parterre de fleurs ou une gazonnière), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière du terrain en réparation.

Lorsque la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par des lignes ou des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe le terrain en réparation, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

 

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/1 - Damage Caused by Committee or Maintenance Staff Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A hole made by maintenance staff is ground under repair even when not marked as ground under repair. However, not all damage caused by maintenance staff is ground under repair by default.

Examples of damage that is not ground under repair by default include:

  • A rut made by a tractor (but the Committee is justified in declaring a deep rut to be ground under repair).
  • An old hole plug that is sunk below the putting green surface, but see Rule 13.1c (Improvements Allowed on Putting Green).

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/2 - Ball in Tree Rooted in Ground Under Repair Is in Ground Under Repair

If a tree is rooted in ground under repair and a player's ball is in a branch of that tree, the ball is in ground under repair even if the branch extends outside the defined area.

If the player decides to take free relief under Rule 16.1 and the spot on the ground directly under where the ball lies in the tree is outside the ground under repair, the reference point for determining the relief area and taking relief is that spot on the ground.

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/3 - Fallen Tree or Tree Stump Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A fallen tree or tree stump that the Committee intends to remove, but is not in the process of being removed, is not automatically ground under repair. However, if the tree and the tree stump are in the process of being unearthed or cut up for later removal, they are “material piled for later removal“ and therefore ground under repair.

For example, a tree that has fallen in the general area and is still attached to the stump is not ground under repair. However, a player could request relief from the Committee and the Committee would be justified in declaring the area covered by the fallen tree to be ground under repair.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Terrain en réparation

Toute partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme étant terrain en réparation (soit en le marquant ou de toute autre façon). Tout terrain en réparation ainsi défini comprend à la fois :

  • Tout le sol à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, et
  • Toute herbe, buisson, arbre ou autre élément naturel, poussant ou fixé, enraciné dans la zone définie, y compris toute partie de ces éléments qui s'étend au dessus du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, mais pas toute partie (par ex. une racine d'arbre) qui est attachée au sol ou en-dessous du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie.

Le terrain en réparation inclut également les choses suivantes même si le Comité ne les définit pas comme tel :

  • Tout trou fait par le Comité ou le personnel d'entretien :
    • En préparant le parcours (par ex. un trou d'où un piquet a été enlevé ou un trou sur un green utilisé pour un autre trou, comme dans le cas d'un green double), ou
    • En entretenant le parcours (par ex. un trou fait en enlevant du gazon ou une souche d'arbre, en posant des canalisations, mais à l'exclusion des trous d'aération).
  • Du gazon coupé, des feuilles et tout autre matériau empilé pour être enlevés ultérieurement. Mais :
    • Tous les matériaux naturels qui sont empilés pour être enlevés, sont également des détritus, et
    • Tous les matériaux laissés sur le parcours et qui ne sont pas destinés à être enlevés ne sont pas terrain en réparation, sauf si le Comité les a définis comme tel.
  • Tout habitat animal (comme un nid d'un oiseau) qui se trouve si près de la balle d'un joueur que le coup ou le stance du joueur pourrait l'endommager, sauf lorsque l'habitat a été créé par des animaux définis comme des détritus (par ex. les vers ou les insectes).

La lisière du terrain en réparation devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par la ligne reliant les points à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur du terrain en réparation.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne de peinture sur le sol, la lisière du terrain en réparation est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans le terrain en réparation.
  • Éléments Physiques : lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (par ex.un parterre de fleurs ou une gazonnière), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière du terrain en réparation.

Lorsque la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par des lignes ou des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe le terrain en réparation, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

 

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/1 - Damage Caused by Committee or Maintenance Staff Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A hole made by maintenance staff is ground under repair even when not marked as ground under repair. However, not all damage caused by maintenance staff is ground under repair by default.

Examples of damage that is not ground under repair by default include:

  • A rut made by a tractor (but the Committee is justified in declaring a deep rut to be ground under repair).
  • An old hole plug that is sunk below the putting green surface, but see Rule 13.1c (Improvements Allowed on Putting Green).

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/2 - Ball in Tree Rooted in Ground Under Repair Is in Ground Under Repair

If a tree is rooted in ground under repair and a player's ball is in a branch of that tree, the ball is in ground under repair even if the branch extends outside the defined area.

If the player decides to take free relief under Rule 16.1 and the spot on the ground directly under where the ball lies in the tree is outside the ground under repair, the reference point for determining the relief area and taking relief is that spot on the ground.

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/3 - Fallen Tree or Tree Stump Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A fallen tree or tree stump that the Committee intends to remove, but is not in the process of being removed, is not automatically ground under repair. However, if the tree and the tree stump are in the process of being unearthed or cut up for later removal, they are “material piled for later removal“ and therefore ground under repair.

For example, a tree that has fallen in the general area and is still attached to the stump is not ground under repair. However, a player could request relief from the Committee and the Committee would be justified in declaring the area covered by the fallen tree to be ground under repair.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Terrain en réparation

Toute partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme étant terrain en réparation (soit en le marquant ou de toute autre façon). Tout terrain en réparation ainsi défini comprend à la fois :

  • Tout le sol à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, et
  • Toute herbe, buisson, arbre ou autre élément naturel, poussant ou fixé, enraciné dans la zone définie, y compris toute partie de ces éléments qui s'étend au dessus du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, mais pas toute partie (par ex. une racine d'arbre) qui est attachée au sol ou en-dessous du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie.

Le terrain en réparation inclut également les choses suivantes même si le Comité ne les définit pas comme tel :

  • Tout trou fait par le Comité ou le personnel d'entretien :
    • En préparant le parcours (par ex. un trou d'où un piquet a été enlevé ou un trou sur un green utilisé pour un autre trou, comme dans le cas d'un green double), ou
    • En entretenant le parcours (par ex. un trou fait en enlevant du gazon ou une souche d'arbre, en posant des canalisations, mais à l'exclusion des trous d'aération).
  • Du gazon coupé, des feuilles et tout autre matériau empilé pour être enlevés ultérieurement. Mais :
    • Tous les matériaux naturels qui sont empilés pour être enlevés, sont également des détritus, et
    • Tous les matériaux laissés sur le parcours et qui ne sont pas destinés à être enlevés ne sont pas terrain en réparation, sauf si le Comité les a définis comme tel.
  • Tout habitat animal (comme un nid d'un oiseau) qui se trouve si près de la balle d'un joueur que le coup ou le stance du joueur pourrait l'endommager, sauf lorsque l'habitat a été créé par des animaux définis comme des détritus (par ex. les vers ou les insectes).

La lisière du terrain en réparation devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par la ligne reliant les points à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur du terrain en réparation.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne de peinture sur le sol, la lisière du terrain en réparation est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans le terrain en réparation.
  • Éléments Physiques : lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (par ex.un parterre de fleurs ou une gazonnière), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière du terrain en réparation.

Lorsque la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par des lignes ou des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe le terrain en réparation, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

 

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/1 - Damage Caused by Committee or Maintenance Staff Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A hole made by maintenance staff is ground under repair even when not marked as ground under repair. However, not all damage caused by maintenance staff is ground under repair by default.

Examples of damage that is not ground under repair by default include:

  • A rut made by a tractor (but the Committee is justified in declaring a deep rut to be ground under repair).
  • An old hole plug that is sunk below the putting green surface, but see Rule 13.1c (Improvements Allowed on Putting Green).

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/2 - Ball in Tree Rooted in Ground Under Repair Is in Ground Under Repair

If a tree is rooted in ground under repair and a player's ball is in a branch of that tree, the ball is in ground under repair even if the branch extends outside the defined area.

If the player decides to take free relief under Rule 16.1 and the spot on the ground directly under where the ball lies in the tree is outside the ground under repair, the reference point for determining the relief area and taking relief is that spot on the ground.

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/3 - Fallen Tree or Tree Stump Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A fallen tree or tree stump that the Committee intends to remove, but is not in the process of being removed, is not automatically ground under repair. However, if the tree and the tree stump are in the process of being unearthed or cut up for later removal, they are “material piled for later removal“ and therefore ground under repair.

For example, a tree that has fallen in the general area and is still attached to the stump is not ground under repair. However, a player could request relief from the Committee and the Committee would be justified in declaring the area covered by the fallen tree to be ground under repair.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Zone à pénalité

Une zone pour laquelle un dégagement avec une pénalité d'un coup est autorisé si la balle du joueur vient y reposer.

Une zone à pénalité est:

  • Toute étendue d'eau sur le parcours (marquée ou non par le Comité), y compris une mer, un lac, un étang, une rivière, un fossé, un fossé de drainage de surface ou un autre cours d'eau à l'air libre (même s'il ne contient pas d'eau), et
  • Toute autre partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme zone à pénalité

Une zone à pénalité est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Il existe deux types différents de zones à pénalité, distinguées par la couleur utilisée pour les marquer :

  • Les zones à pénalité jaunes (marquées avec des lignes jaunes ou des piquets jaunes) offrent au joueur deux options de dégagement (Règle 17.1d(1) et (2)).
  • Les zones à pénalité rouges (marquées avec des lignes rouges ou des piquets rouges) offrent au joueur une option de dégagement latéral supplémentaire (Règle 17.1d(3)), en plus des deux options utilisables pour les zones à pénalité jaunes.

Si la couleur d'une zone à pénalité n'a pas été marquée ou indiquée par le Comité, cette zone est considérée comme une zone à pénalité rouge.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité s'étend à la fois au-dessus du sol et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière font partie de la zone à pénalité, qu'ils se trouvent sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière (comme un pont au-dessus de la zone à pénalité, ou un arbre enraciné à l'intérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'extérieur de la lisière ou vice versa), seule la partie de l'objet située à l'intérieur de la lisière fait partie de la zone à pénalité.

La lisière d'une zone à pénalité devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur de la zone à pénalité.
  • Lignes : Lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière de la zone à pénalité est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans la zone à pénalité.
  • Éléments physiques : Lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (comme une plage ou une zone désertique ou un mur de soutènement), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière de la zone à pénalité

Lorsque la lisière d'une zone à pénalité est définie par des lignes ou par des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe la zone à pénalité, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Lorsque la lisière d'une étendue d'eau n'est pas définie par le Comité, la lisière de cette zone à pénalité est définie par ses limites naturelles (c'est-à-dire là où le sol s'incline vers le bas pour former la dépression pouvant contenir l'eau).

Si un cours d'eau à l'air libre ne contient habituellement pas d'eau (par ex. un fossé de drainage ou une zone de ruissellement qui est sèche sauf pendant la saison des pluies), le Comité peut définir cette zone comme faisant partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas une zone à pénalité).

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Hors limites

Toutes les zones situées à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites du parcours telles que définies par le Comité. Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de cette lisière sont dans les limites.

La lisière des limites du parcours s'étend à la fois au-dessus et au-dessous du sol :

  • Cela signifie que tout le sol et toute autre chose (comme tout objet naturel ou artificiel) à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites est dans les limites, que ce soit sur, au-dessus ou en dessous de la surface du sol.
  • Si un objet est à la fois à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites (comme les marches attachées à une clôture ou un arbre enraciné à l'extérieur de la lisière avec des branches s'étendant à l'intérieur ou inversement), seule la partie de l'objet qui est à l'extérieur de la lisière est hors limites.

La lisière des limites devrait être définie par des éléments de limites ou des lignes :

  • Éléments de limites : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets ou une clôture, la lisière des limites est définie par la ligne entre les points côté parcours des piquets ou des poteaux de clôture au niveau du sol (à l'exclusion des supports inclinés), et ces piquets ou poteaux de clôture sont hors limites.
    Lorsqu'elle est définie par d'autres objets tels qu'un mur, ou lorsque le Comité souhaite traiter différemment une clôture de limites, le Comité devrait définir la lisière des limites.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne peinte sur le sol, la lisière des limites est le bord côté parcours de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est hors limites.
    Lorsqu'une ligne au sol définit la lisière des limites, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour montrer où se situe la lisière des limites, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

Les piquets ou lignes de limites devraient être blancs.

Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Sûr ou quasiment certain

La norme pour décider ce qui est arrivé à la balle d'un joueur – pour déterminer par exemple, si la balle repose dans une zone à pénalité, si la balle s'est déplacée ou ce qui a causé son déplacement.

Sûr ou quasiment certain signifie plus que "possible" ou "probable". Cela veut dire que :

  • Soit il y a des preuves convaincantes que le fait en question s'est bien produit sur la balle du joueur, par ex. lorsque le joueur ou d'autres témoins ont vu cela se produire,
  • Soit il y a un très petit pourcentage de doute, toutes les informations raisonnablement disponibles montrant qu'il y a une probabilité d'au moins 95% que le fait en question se soit produit.

L'expression “toutes les informations raisonnablement disponibles“ recouvre toutes les informations dont le joueur a connaissance ainsi que toutes les autres informations qu'il peut obtenir de façon raisonnable et sans retard déraisonnable

 

Interpretation Known or Virtually Certain/1 - Applying “Known or Virtually Certain“ Standard When Ball Moves

When it is not “known“ what caused the ball to move, all reasonably available information must be considered and the evidence must be evaluated to determine if it is “virtually certain“ that the player, opponent or outside influence caused the ball to move.

Depending on the circumstances, reasonably available information may include, but is not limited to:

  • The effect of any actions taken near the ball (such as movement of loose impediments, practice swings, grounding club and taking a stance),
  • Time elapsed between such actions and the movement of the ball,
  • The lie of the ball before it moved (such as on a fairway, perched on longer grass, on a surface imperfection or on the putting green),
  • The conditions of the ground near the ball (such as the degree of slope or presence of surface irregularities, etc), and
  • Wind speed and direction, rain and other weather conditions.

Interpretation Known or Virtually Certain/2 - Virtual Certainty Is Irrelevant if It Comes to Light After Three-Minute Search Expires

Determining whether there is knowledge or virtual certainty must be based on evidence known to the player at the time the three-minute search time expires.

Examples of when the player's later findings are irrelevant include when:

  • A player's tee shot comes to rest in an area containing heavy rough and a large animal hole. After a three-minute search, it is determined that it is not known or virtually certain that the ball is in the animal hole. As the player returns to the teeing area, the ball is found in the animal hole.
  • Even though the player has not yet put another ball in play, the player must take stroke-and-distance relief for a lost ball (Rule 18.2b - What to Do When Ball is Lost or Out of Bounds) since it was not known or virtually certain that the ball was in the animal hole, when the search time expired.
  • A player cannot find his or her ball and believes it may have been picked up by a spectator (outside influence), but there is not enough evidence to be virtually certain of this. A short time after the three-minute search time expires, a spectator is found to have the player's ball.

The player must take stroke-and-distance relief for a lost ball (Rule 18.2b) since the movement by the outside influence only became known after the search time expired.

Interpretation Known or Virtually Certain/3 - Player Unaware Ball Played by Another Player

It must be known or virtually certain that a player's ball has been played by another player as a wrong ball to treat it as being moved.

For example, in stroke play, Player A and Player B hit their tee shots into the same general location. Player A finds a ball and plays it. Player B goes forward to look for his or her ball and cannot find it. After three minutes, Player B starts back to the tee to play another ball. On the way, Player B finds Player A's ball and knows then that Player A has played his or her ball in error.

Player A gets the general penalty for playing a wrong ball and must then play his or her own ball (Rule 6.3c). Player A's ball was not lost even though both players searched for more than three minutes because Player A did not start searching for his or her ball; the searching was for Player B's ball. Regarding Player B's ball, Player B's original ball was lost and he or she must put another ball in play under penalty of stroke and distance (Rule 18.2b), because it was not known or virtually certain when the three-minute search time expired that the ball had been played by another player.

Condition anormale du parcours

N'importe laquelle des quatre conditions suivantes spécifiquement définies :

  • Trou d'animal
  • Terrain en réparation
  • Obstruction inamovible, ou
  • Eau temporaire
Balle provisoire

Une autre balle jouée dans le cas où la balle qui vient d'être jouée par le joueur peut être :

  • Hors limites, ou
  • Perdue à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité.

Une balle provisoire n'est pas la balle en jeu du joueur, à moins qu'elle ne devienne la balle en jeu selon la Règle 18.3c.

Carte de score

Document sur lequel le score d'un joueur sur chaque trou est enregistré en stroke play.

La carte de score peut se présenter sous n'importe quelle forme approuvée par le Comité, papier ou électronique, permettant :

  • D'enregistrer le score du joueur pour chaque trou,
  • D'enregistrer le handicap du joueur, s'il s'agit d'une compétition avec handicap, et
  • Au marqueur et au joueur de certifier les scores, et au joueur de certifier son handicap dans une compétition avec handicap, soit par signature physique, soit par une méthode de certification électronique approuvée par le Comité.

Une carte de score n'est pas exigée en match play mais peut être utilisée par les joueurs pour aider à tenir à jour le score du match.

Terrain en réparation

Toute partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme étant terrain en réparation (soit en le marquant ou de toute autre façon). Tout terrain en réparation ainsi défini comprend à la fois :

  • Tout le sol à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, et
  • Toute herbe, buisson, arbre ou autre élément naturel, poussant ou fixé, enraciné dans la zone définie, y compris toute partie de ces éléments qui s'étend au dessus du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, mais pas toute partie (par ex. une racine d'arbre) qui est attachée au sol ou en-dessous du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie.

Le terrain en réparation inclut également les choses suivantes même si le Comité ne les définit pas comme tel :

  • Tout trou fait par le Comité ou le personnel d'entretien :
    • En préparant le parcours (par ex. un trou d'où un piquet a été enlevé ou un trou sur un green utilisé pour un autre trou, comme dans le cas d'un green double), ou
    • En entretenant le parcours (par ex. un trou fait en enlevant du gazon ou une souche d'arbre, en posant des canalisations, mais à l'exclusion des trous d'aération).
  • Du gazon coupé, des feuilles et tout autre matériau empilé pour être enlevés ultérieurement. Mais :
    • Tous les matériaux naturels qui sont empilés pour être enlevés, sont également des détritus, et
    • Tous les matériaux laissés sur le parcours et qui ne sont pas destinés à être enlevés ne sont pas terrain en réparation, sauf si le Comité les a définis comme tel.
  • Tout habitat animal (comme un nid d'un oiseau) qui se trouve si près de la balle d'un joueur que le coup ou le stance du joueur pourrait l'endommager, sauf lorsque l'habitat a été créé par des animaux définis comme des détritus (par ex. les vers ou les insectes).

La lisière du terrain en réparation devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par la ligne reliant les points à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur du terrain en réparation.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne de peinture sur le sol, la lisière du terrain en réparation est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans le terrain en réparation.
  • Éléments Physiques : lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (par ex.un parterre de fleurs ou une gazonnière), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière du terrain en réparation.

Lorsque la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par des lignes ou des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe le terrain en réparation, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

 

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/1 - Damage Caused by Committee or Maintenance Staff Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A hole made by maintenance staff is ground under repair even when not marked as ground under repair. However, not all damage caused by maintenance staff is ground under repair by default.

Examples of damage that is not ground under repair by default include:

  • A rut made by a tractor (but the Committee is justified in declaring a deep rut to be ground under repair).
  • An old hole plug that is sunk below the putting green surface, but see Rule 13.1c (Improvements Allowed on Putting Green).

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/2 - Ball in Tree Rooted in Ground Under Repair Is in Ground Under Repair

If a tree is rooted in ground under repair and a player's ball is in a branch of that tree, the ball is in ground under repair even if the branch extends outside the defined area.

If the player decides to take free relief under Rule 16.1 and the spot on the ground directly under where the ball lies in the tree is outside the ground under repair, the reference point for determining the relief area and taking relief is that spot on the ground.

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/3 - Fallen Tree or Tree Stump Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A fallen tree or tree stump that the Committee intends to remove, but is not in the process of being removed, is not automatically ground under repair. However, if the tree and the tree stump are in the process of being unearthed or cut up for later removal, they are “material piled for later removal“ and therefore ground under repair.

For example, a tree that has fallen in the general area and is still attached to the stump is not ground under repair. However, a player could request relief from the Committee and the Committee would be justified in declaring the area covered by the fallen tree to be ground under repair.

Terrain en réparation

Toute partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme étant terrain en réparation (soit en le marquant ou de toute autre façon). Tout terrain en réparation ainsi défini comprend à la fois :

  • Tout le sol à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, et
  • Toute herbe, buisson, arbre ou autre élément naturel, poussant ou fixé, enraciné dans la zone définie, y compris toute partie de ces éléments qui s'étend au dessus du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, mais pas toute partie (par ex. une racine d'arbre) qui est attachée au sol ou en-dessous du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie.

Le terrain en réparation inclut également les choses suivantes même si le Comité ne les définit pas comme tel :

  • Tout trou fait par le Comité ou le personnel d'entretien :
    • En préparant le parcours (par ex. un trou d'où un piquet a été enlevé ou un trou sur un green utilisé pour un autre trou, comme dans le cas d'un green double), ou
    • En entretenant le parcours (par ex. un trou fait en enlevant du gazon ou une souche d'arbre, en posant des canalisations, mais à l'exclusion des trous d'aération).
  • Du gazon coupé, des feuilles et tout autre matériau empilé pour être enlevés ultérieurement. Mais :
    • Tous les matériaux naturels qui sont empilés pour être enlevés, sont également des détritus, et
    • Tous les matériaux laissés sur le parcours et qui ne sont pas destinés à être enlevés ne sont pas terrain en réparation, sauf si le Comité les a définis comme tel.
  • Tout habitat animal (comme un nid d'un oiseau) qui se trouve si près de la balle d'un joueur que le coup ou le stance du joueur pourrait l'endommager, sauf lorsque l'habitat a été créé par des animaux définis comme des détritus (par ex. les vers ou les insectes).

La lisière du terrain en réparation devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par la ligne reliant les points à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur du terrain en réparation.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne de peinture sur le sol, la lisière du terrain en réparation est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans le terrain en réparation.
  • Éléments Physiques : lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (par ex.un parterre de fleurs ou une gazonnière), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière du terrain en réparation.

Lorsque la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par des lignes ou des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe le terrain en réparation, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

 

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/1 - Damage Caused by Committee or Maintenance Staff Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A hole made by maintenance staff is ground under repair even when not marked as ground under repair. However, not all damage caused by maintenance staff is ground under repair by default.

Examples of damage that is not ground under repair by default include:

  • A rut made by a tractor (but the Committee is justified in declaring a deep rut to be ground under repair).
  • An old hole plug that is sunk below the putting green surface, but see Rule 13.1c (Improvements Allowed on Putting Green).

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/2 - Ball in Tree Rooted in Ground Under Repair Is in Ground Under Repair

If a tree is rooted in ground under repair and a player's ball is in a branch of that tree, the ball is in ground under repair even if the branch extends outside the defined area.

If the player decides to take free relief under Rule 16.1 and the spot on the ground directly under where the ball lies in the tree is outside the ground under repair, the reference point for determining the relief area and taking relief is that spot on the ground.

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/3 - Fallen Tree or Tree Stump Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A fallen tree or tree stump that the Committee intends to remove, but is not in the process of being removed, is not automatically ground under repair. However, if the tree and the tree stump are in the process of being unearthed or cut up for later removal, they are “material piled for later removal“ and therefore ground under repair.

For example, a tree that has fallen in the general area and is still attached to the stump is not ground under repair. However, a player could request relief from the Committee and the Committee would be justified in declaring the area covered by the fallen tree to be ground under repair.

Zone de dégagement

La zone dans laquelle un joueur doit dropper une balle en se dégageant selon une Règle. Chaque Règle de dégagement exige que le joueur utilise une zone de dégagement spécifique dont la taille et l'emplacement sont basés sur les trois facteurs suivants :

  • Le point de référence : le point à partir duquel la dimension de la zone de dégagement est mesurée.
  • La dimension de la zone de dégagement mesurée à partir du point de référence : la zone de dégagement est soit une, soit deux longueurs de club à partir du point de référence, mais avec certaines limites :
  • Les limites de l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement : l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement peut être limité d'une ou plusieurs façons, de sorte que, par exemple :
    • Cet emplacement ne soit que dans certaines zones du parcours spécifiquement définies, par ex. seulement dans la zone générale, ou pas dans un bunker ni dans une zone à pénalité,
    • Cet emplacement ne soit pas plus près du trou que le point de référence ou qu'il doive être à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité ou d'un bunker d'où le dégagement est pris, ou
    • Cet emplacement se situe à un endroit où il n'y a plus d'interférence (telle que définie dans la Règle particulière) de la condition pour laquelle le dégagement est pris.

En utilisant les longueurs de club pour déterminer la taille d'une zone de dégagement, le joueur peut mesurer directement à travers un fossé, un trou ou un élément similaire, et directement à travers un objet (comme un arbre, une clôture, un mur,un tunnel, un drain ou une tête d'arroseur) mais il n'est pas autorisé à mesurer à travers un sol qui est naturellement en pente montante ou descendante.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 2I (le Comité peut choisir d'autoriser ou d'exiger l'utilisation par le joueur d'une dropping zone en tant que zone de dégagement).


Clarification - Déterminer si la balle repose ou non dans la zone de dégagement.

Lorsqu’on cherche à déterminer si une balle est venue reposer à l’intérieur d’une zone de dégagement (par ex. à une ou deux longueurs de club du point de référence selon la Règle appliquée), la balle est dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle se trouve à l’intérieur de la mesure d’une ou deux longueurs de club. Cependant une balle n’est pas dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle est plus proche du trou que le point de référence ou si la condition à l’origine du dégagement gratuit interfère avec n’importe quelle partie de la balle.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Terrain en réparation

Toute partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme étant terrain en réparation (soit en le marquant ou de toute autre façon). Tout terrain en réparation ainsi défini comprend à la fois :

  • Tout le sol à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, et
  • Toute herbe, buisson, arbre ou autre élément naturel, poussant ou fixé, enraciné dans la zone définie, y compris toute partie de ces éléments qui s'étend au dessus du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, mais pas toute partie (par ex. une racine d'arbre) qui est attachée au sol ou en-dessous du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie.

Le terrain en réparation inclut également les choses suivantes même si le Comité ne les définit pas comme tel :

  • Tout trou fait par le Comité ou le personnel d'entretien :
    • En préparant le parcours (par ex. un trou d'où un piquet a été enlevé ou un trou sur un green utilisé pour un autre trou, comme dans le cas d'un green double), ou
    • En entretenant le parcours (par ex. un trou fait en enlevant du gazon ou une souche d'arbre, en posant des canalisations, mais à l'exclusion des trous d'aération).
  • Du gazon coupé, des feuilles et tout autre matériau empilé pour être enlevés ultérieurement. Mais :
    • Tous les matériaux naturels qui sont empilés pour être enlevés, sont également des détritus, et
    • Tous les matériaux laissés sur le parcours et qui ne sont pas destinés à être enlevés ne sont pas terrain en réparation, sauf si le Comité les a définis comme tel.
  • Tout habitat animal (comme un nid d'un oiseau) qui se trouve si près de la balle d'un joueur que le coup ou le stance du joueur pourrait l'endommager, sauf lorsque l'habitat a été créé par des animaux définis comme des détritus (par ex. les vers ou les insectes).

La lisière du terrain en réparation devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par la ligne reliant les points à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur du terrain en réparation.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne de peinture sur le sol, la lisière du terrain en réparation est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans le terrain en réparation.
  • Éléments Physiques : lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (par ex.un parterre de fleurs ou une gazonnière), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière du terrain en réparation.

Lorsque la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par des lignes ou des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe le terrain en réparation, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

 

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/1 - Damage Caused by Committee or Maintenance Staff Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A hole made by maintenance staff is ground under repair even when not marked as ground under repair. However, not all damage caused by maintenance staff is ground under repair by default.

Examples of damage that is not ground under repair by default include:

  • A rut made by a tractor (but the Committee is justified in declaring a deep rut to be ground under repair).
  • An old hole plug that is sunk below the putting green surface, but see Rule 13.1c (Improvements Allowed on Putting Green).

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/2 - Ball in Tree Rooted in Ground Under Repair Is in Ground Under Repair

If a tree is rooted in ground under repair and a player's ball is in a branch of that tree, the ball is in ground under repair even if the branch extends outside the defined area.

If the player decides to take free relief under Rule 16.1 and the spot on the ground directly under where the ball lies in the tree is outside the ground under repair, the reference point for determining the relief area and taking relief is that spot on the ground.

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/3 - Fallen Tree or Tree Stump Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A fallen tree or tree stump that the Committee intends to remove, but is not in the process of being removed, is not automatically ground under repair. However, if the tree and the tree stump are in the process of being unearthed or cut up for later removal, they are “material piled for later removal“ and therefore ground under repair.

For example, a tree that has fallen in the general area and is still attached to the stump is not ground under repair. However, a player could request relief from the Committee and the Committee would be justified in declaring the area covered by the fallen tree to be ground under repair.

Zone de dégagement

La zone dans laquelle un joueur doit dropper une balle en se dégageant selon une Règle. Chaque Règle de dégagement exige que le joueur utilise une zone de dégagement spécifique dont la taille et l'emplacement sont basés sur les trois facteurs suivants :

  • Le point de référence : le point à partir duquel la dimension de la zone de dégagement est mesurée.
  • La dimension de la zone de dégagement mesurée à partir du point de référence : la zone de dégagement est soit une, soit deux longueurs de club à partir du point de référence, mais avec certaines limites :
  • Les limites de l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement : l'emplacement de la zone de dégagement peut être limité d'une ou plusieurs façons, de sorte que, par exemple :
    • Cet emplacement ne soit que dans certaines zones du parcours spécifiquement définies, par ex. seulement dans la zone générale, ou pas dans un bunker ni dans une zone à pénalité,
    • Cet emplacement ne soit pas plus près du trou que le point de référence ou qu'il doive être à l'extérieur d'une zone à pénalité ou d'un bunker d'où le dégagement est pris, ou
    • Cet emplacement se situe à un endroit où il n'y a plus d'interférence (telle que définie dans la Règle particulière) de la condition pour laquelle le dégagement est pris.

En utilisant les longueurs de club pour déterminer la taille d'une zone de dégagement, le joueur peut mesurer directement à travers un fossé, un trou ou un élément similaire, et directement à travers un objet (comme un arbre, une clôture, un mur,un tunnel, un drain ou une tête d'arroseur) mais il n'est pas autorisé à mesurer à travers un sol qui est naturellement en pente montante ou descendante.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 2I (le Comité peut choisir d'autoriser ou d'exiger l'utilisation par le joueur d'une dropping zone en tant que zone de dégagement).


Clarification - Déterminer si la balle repose ou non dans la zone de dégagement.

Lorsqu’on cherche à déterminer si une balle est venue reposer à l’intérieur d’une zone de dégagement (par ex. à une ou deux longueurs de club du point de référence selon la Règle appliquée), la balle est dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle se trouve à l’intérieur de la mesure d’une ou deux longueurs de club. Cependant une balle n’est pas dans la zone de dégagement si n’importe quelle partie de cette balle est plus proche du trou que le point de référence ou si la condition à l’origine du dégagement gratuit interfère avec n’importe quelle partie de la balle.
(Clarification de décembre 2018)

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Terrain en réparation

Toute partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme étant terrain en réparation (soit en le marquant ou de toute autre façon). Tout terrain en réparation ainsi défini comprend à la fois :

  • Tout le sol à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, et
  • Toute herbe, buisson, arbre ou autre élément naturel, poussant ou fixé, enraciné dans la zone définie, y compris toute partie de ces éléments qui s'étend au dessus du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, mais pas toute partie (par ex. une racine d'arbre) qui est attachée au sol ou en-dessous du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie.

Le terrain en réparation inclut également les choses suivantes même si le Comité ne les définit pas comme tel :

  • Tout trou fait par le Comité ou le personnel d'entretien :
    • En préparant le parcours (par ex. un trou d'où un piquet a été enlevé ou un trou sur un green utilisé pour un autre trou, comme dans le cas d'un green double), ou
    • En entretenant le parcours (par ex. un trou fait en enlevant du gazon ou une souche d'arbre, en posant des canalisations, mais à l'exclusion des trous d'aération).
  • Du gazon coupé, des feuilles et tout autre matériau empilé pour être enlevés ultérieurement. Mais :
    • Tous les matériaux naturels qui sont empilés pour être enlevés, sont également des détritus, et
    • Tous les matériaux laissés sur le parcours et qui ne sont pas destinés à être enlevés ne sont pas terrain en réparation, sauf si le Comité les a définis comme tel.
  • Tout habitat animal (comme un nid d'un oiseau) qui se trouve si près de la balle d'un joueur que le coup ou le stance du joueur pourrait l'endommager, sauf lorsque l'habitat a été créé par des animaux définis comme des détritus (par ex. les vers ou les insectes).

La lisière du terrain en réparation devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par la ligne reliant les points à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur du terrain en réparation.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne de peinture sur le sol, la lisière du terrain en réparation est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans le terrain en réparation.
  • Éléments Physiques : lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (par ex.un parterre de fleurs ou une gazonnière), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière du terrain en réparation.

Lorsque la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par des lignes ou des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe le terrain en réparation, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

 

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/1 - Damage Caused by Committee or Maintenance Staff Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A hole made by maintenance staff is ground under repair even when not marked as ground under repair. However, not all damage caused by maintenance staff is ground under repair by default.

Examples of damage that is not ground under repair by default include:

  • A rut made by a tractor (but the Committee is justified in declaring a deep rut to be ground under repair).
  • An old hole plug that is sunk below the putting green surface, but see Rule 13.1c (Improvements Allowed on Putting Green).

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/2 - Ball in Tree Rooted in Ground Under Repair Is in Ground Under Repair

If a tree is rooted in ground under repair and a player's ball is in a branch of that tree, the ball is in ground under repair even if the branch extends outside the defined area.

If the player decides to take free relief under Rule 16.1 and the spot on the ground directly under where the ball lies in the tree is outside the ground under repair, the reference point for determining the relief area and taking relief is that spot on the ground.

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/3 - Fallen Tree or Tree Stump Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A fallen tree or tree stump that the Committee intends to remove, but is not in the process of being removed, is not automatically ground under repair. However, if the tree and the tree stump are in the process of being unearthed or cut up for later removal, they are “material piled for later removal“ and therefore ground under repair.

For example, a tree that has fallen in the general area and is still attached to the stump is not ground under repair. However, a player could request relief from the Committee and the Committee would be justified in declaring the area covered by the fallen tree to be ground under repair.

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Terrain en réparation

Toute partie du parcours que le Comité définit comme étant terrain en réparation (soit en le marquant ou de toute autre façon). Tout terrain en réparation ainsi défini comprend à la fois :

  • Tout le sol à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, et
  • Toute herbe, buisson, arbre ou autre élément naturel, poussant ou fixé, enraciné dans la zone définie, y compris toute partie de ces éléments qui s'étend au dessus du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie, mais pas toute partie (par ex. une racine d'arbre) qui est attachée au sol ou en-dessous du sol à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone définie.

Le terrain en réparation inclut également les choses suivantes même si le Comité ne les définit pas comme tel :

  • Tout trou fait par le Comité ou le personnel d'entretien :
    • En préparant le parcours (par ex. un trou d'où un piquet a été enlevé ou un trou sur un green utilisé pour un autre trou, comme dans le cas d'un green double), ou
    • En entretenant le parcours (par ex. un trou fait en enlevant du gazon ou une souche d'arbre, en posant des canalisations, mais à l'exclusion des trous d'aération).
  • Du gazon coupé, des feuilles et tout autre matériau empilé pour être enlevés ultérieurement. Mais :
    • Tous les matériaux naturels qui sont empilés pour être enlevés, sont également des détritus, et
    • Tous les matériaux laissés sur le parcours et qui ne sont pas destinés à être enlevés ne sont pas terrain en réparation, sauf si le Comité les a définis comme tel.
  • Tout habitat animal (comme un nid d'un oiseau) qui se trouve si près de la balle d'un joueur que le coup ou le stance du joueur pourrait l'endommager, sauf lorsque l'habitat a été créé par des animaux définis comme des détritus (par ex. les vers ou les insectes).

La lisière du terrain en réparation devrait être définie par des piquets, des lignes ou des éléments physiques :

  • Piquets : lorsqu'elle est définie par des piquets, la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par la ligne reliant les points à l'extérieur des piquets au niveau du sol, et les piquets sont à l'intérieur du terrain en réparation.
  • Lignes : lorsqu'elle est définie par une ligne de peinture sur le sol, la lisière du terrain en réparation est le bord extérieur de la ligne, et la ligne elle-même est dans le terrain en réparation.
  • Éléments Physiques : lorsqu'elle est définie par des éléments physiques (par ex.un parterre de fleurs ou une gazonnière), le Comité devrait dire comment est définie la lisière du terrain en réparation.

Lorsque la lisière du terrain en réparation est définie par des lignes ou des éléments physiques, des piquets peuvent être utilisés pour indiquer où se situe le terrain en réparation, mais ils n'ont pas d'autre signification.

 

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/1 - Damage Caused by Committee or Maintenance Staff Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A hole made by maintenance staff is ground under repair even when not marked as ground under repair. However, not all damage caused by maintenance staff is ground under repair by default.

Examples of damage that is not ground under repair by default include:

  • A rut made by a tractor (but the Committee is justified in declaring a deep rut to be ground under repair).
  • An old hole plug that is sunk below the putting green surface, but see Rule 13.1c (Improvements Allowed on Putting Green).

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/2 - Ball in Tree Rooted in Ground Under Repair Is in Ground Under Repair

If a tree is rooted in ground under repair and a player's ball is in a branch of that tree, the ball is in ground under repair even if the branch extends outside the defined area.

If the player decides to take free relief under Rule 16.1 and the spot on the ground directly under where the ball lies in the tree is outside the ground under repair, the reference point for determining the relief area and taking relief is that spot on the ground.

Interpretation Ground Under Repair/3 - Fallen Tree or Tree Stump Is Not Always Ground Under Repair

A fallen tree or tree stump that the Committee intends to remove, but is not in the process of being removed, is not automatically ground under repair. However, if the tree and the tree stump are in the process of being unearthed or cut up for later removal, they are “material piled for later removal“ and therefore ground under repair.

For example, a tree that has fallen in the general area and is still attached to the stump is not ground under repair. However, a player could request relief from the Committee and the Committee would be justified in declaring the area covered by the fallen tree to be ground under repair.

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Arbitre

Officiel nommé par le Comité pour résoudre des questions de fait et faire appliquer les Règles.

Voir Procédures pour  le Comité, Section 6C (expliquant les responsabilités et les pouvoirs d'un arbitre).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Arbitre

Officiel nommé par le Comité pour résoudre des questions de fait et faire appliquer les Règles.

Voir Procédures pour  le Comité, Section 6C (expliquant les responsabilités et les pouvoirs d'un arbitre).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).