The R&A - Working for Golf
Jouer un tour
Aller à la Section
5.2
5.2b
5.2b/1
5.2b/2
5.2b/3
5.2
5.2/C1
5.3
5.3a
5.3a/1
5.3a/2
5.3a/3
5.3a/4
5.3a/5
5.5
5.5a
5.5a/1
5.5b
5.5b/1
5.5c
5.5c/1
5.6
5.6a
5.6a/1
5.6a/2
5.7
5.7a
5.7a/1
5.7b
5.7b(1)/1
5.7b/1
5.7c
5.7c/1
5.7d
5.7d(1)/1
5.7d(1)/2

Objet de la Règle : La Règle 5 traite de la façon de jouer un tour — par ex. quand et où un joueur peut s'entraîner sur le parcours avant ou pendant un tour, quand un tour commence et finit et ce qui arrive quand le jeu doit être interrompu ou repris. Les joueurs sont censés :

  • Commencer chaque tour à l'heure et
  • Jouer de manière continue, et à une cadence rapide pendant chaque trou jusqu'à ce que le tour soit terminé.

Quand c'est au tour d'un joueur de jouer, il est recommandé qu'il joue le coup en 40 secondes maximum, et généralement plus rapidement que cela.

5.2
Entraînement sur le parcours avant ou entre des tours
5.2b
Stroke play
5.2b/1
Meaning of “Completing Play of His or Her Final Round for That Day” in Stroke Play

In stroke play, a player has completed his or her final round for that day when he or she will not play any more holes that day on the course as part of the competition.

For example, having completed play in the first round on the first day of a two-day 36-hole stroke-play competition, a player is permitted by Rule 5.2b to practise on the competition course later that day as long as his or her next round will not start until the next day.

However, if the player finishes one round but will play another round or part of a round on the course on that same day, practising on the course would breach Rule 5.2b.

For example, having completed play in a stroke-play qualifying round for a match-play competition, a player practises on the course. After the conclusion of play, the player is tied for the last qualifying place for the match-play competition. The tie is to be decided by a hole-by-hole stroke-play play-off that is scheduled to be played immediately after play the same day on that course.

If the player's practice on the course was his or her first breach of Rule 5.2b, the player gets the general penalty applied to the first hole of the play-off. Otherwise, the player is disqualified from the play-off under Rule 5.2b for practising on the course before the play-off.

5.2b/2
Practice Stroke After Hole But Between Rounds Allowed

The permissions for practising in Rule 5.5b (Restriction on Practice Strokes Between Two Holes) override the prohibitions in Rule 5.2b in that a player is allowed to practise on or near the putting green of the hole just completed even if he or she will play that hole again on the same day.

Examples of when practising putting or chipping on or near the putting green of the hole just completed is allowed even though play for the day is not over include when:

  • A player is playing an 18-hole stroke-play competition on a 9-hole course in one day and practises putting on the 3rd green after completing the 3rd hole during the first round.
  • A player is playing a 36-hole stroke-play competition on the same course in one day and practises chipping near the 18th green after completing the 18th hole during the first round.
5.2b/3
Practising May Be Allowed on Course Before a Round in a Competition that Covers Consecutive Days

When a competition is scheduled on a course over consecutive days and the Committee schedules some players to play on the first day and others to play on a later day, a player is allowed to practise on the course on any day that he or she is not scheduled to play his or her round.

For example, if a competition is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday and a player is only scheduled to play on Sunday, that player is allowed to practise on the course on Saturday.

5.2/C1
Clarification: First Breach Happens When First Stroke Made

The penalty for the first breach of Rule 5.2 applies when a player commits a single act (such as making a stroke). The disqualification penalty for the second breach applies when that player commits any subsequent act that is not allowed (such as rolling a ball or making another stroke). These are not treated as related acts under Rule 1.3c(4).

(Clarification added 12/2018)

5.3
Commencement et fin d'un tour
5.3a
Commencement d'un tour
5.3a/1
Exceptional Circumstances That Warrant Waiving Starting Time Penalty

The term "exceptional circumstances" in Exception 3 under Rule 5.3a does not mean unfortunate or unexpected events outside a player's control. It is a player's responsibility to allow enough time to reach the course and he or she must make allowances for possible delays.

There is no specific guidance in the Rules for deciding what is exceptional, as it depends on the circumstances in each case and must be left to the determination of the Committee.

One important factor not included in the examples below is that consideration should be given to a situation where multiple players are involved to the extent that the Committee should consider the situation to be exceptional.

Examples of circumstances that should be considered as exceptional include:

  • The player was present at the scene of an accident and provided medical assistance or was required to give a statement as a witness and otherwise would have started on time.
  • There is a fire alarm at the player's hotel and he or she must evacuate. By the time the player can return to the room to dress or retrieve his or her equipment, the player is unable to make his or her starting time.

Examples of circumstances that would not generally be considered exceptional include:

  • The player gets lost or his or her car breaks down on the way to the course.
  • Heavy traffic or an accident results in the journey to the course taking longer than expected.
5.3a/2
Meaning of “Starting Point”

In Rule 5.3a, the "starting point" is the teeing area of the hole where the player will start his or her round as set by the Committee.

For example, the Committee may start some groups on the 1st tee and some groups on the 10th tee. In a "shotgun start", the Committee may assign each group a different hole to start on.

The Committee may set a standard for what it means for the player to be at the starting point. For example, the Committee may state that, to be at the starting point, the player must be within the gallery ropes of the teeing area of the hole to be played.

5.3a/3
Meaning of “Ready to Play”

The term "ready to play" means that the player has at least one club and ball ready for immediate use.

For example, if a player arrives at his or her starting point by the starting time with a ball and a club (even if just the player's putter), the player is considered ready to play. Should the player decide to wait for a different club when it is his or her turn to play, he or she may get a penalty for unreasonably delaying play (Rule 5.6a).

5.3a/4
Player at Starting Point but Then Leaves Starting Point

When a player is ready to play at the starting point, but then leaves the starting point for some reason, the Rule that applies depends if he or she is ready to play at the starting point at the starting time.

For example, a player's starting time is 9:00 am and he or she is ready to play at the starting point at 8:57 am. The player realizes that he or she left something in a locker and leaves the starting point to get it. If the player does not arrive back at the starting point at 9:00:00 am, the player is late to his or her starting time, and Rule 5.3a applies.

However, if the player was ready to play at the starting point at 9:00 am and then went to his or her locker, the player may get the penalty under Rule 5.6a (Unreasonable Delay) since he or she satisfied the requirement of Rule 5.3a by being ready to play at the starting point by the starting time.

5.3a/5
Match Starts on Second Hole When Both Players Late

When both players in a match arrive at the starting point ready to play no more than five minutes after their starting time and neither has experienced exceptional circumstances (Exception 3), they both get a loss of hole penalty and the result of the first hole is a tie.

For example, if the starting time is 9:00 am and the player arrives at the starting point ready to play at 9:02 am and the opponent arrives ready to play at 9:04 am, they both get a loss of hole penalty even though the player arrived before the opponent (Exception 1). Therefore, the first hole is tied and the match starts on the second hole all square. There is no penalty if they play the first hole to get to the teeing area of the second hole.

5.5
Entraînement pendant un tour ou pendant une interruption de jeu
5.5a
Pas de coups d'entraînement en jouant un trou
5.5a/1
Practice Stroke with Ball of Similar Size to Conforming Ball is Breach

A "practice stroke"under Rule 5.5a covers not only hitting a conforming ball with a club but hitting any other type of ball that is similar in size to a golf ball, such as a plastic practice ball.

Striking a tee or natural object with a club (such as a stone or a pine cone) is not a practice stroke.

5.5b
Restriction sur les coups d'entraînement entre le jeu de deux trous
5.5b/1
When Practising Between Holes Is Allowed

A player is allowed to practise putting and chipping when he or she is between the play of two holes. This is when the player has completed play of the previous hole, or in a form of play involving a partner, when the side has completed play of the previous hole.

Examples of when a player is between the play of two holes:

Match Play:

  • Single -  When the player has holed out, his or her next stroke has been conceded, or the outcome of the hole has been determined.
  • Foursome - When the side has holed out, its next stroke has been conceded, or the outcome of the hole has been determined.
  • Four-Ball - When both partners have holed out, their next strokes have been conceded, or the outcome of the hole has been determined.

Stroke Play:

  • Individual - When the player has holed out.
  • Foursome - When the side has holed out.
  • Four-Ball - When both partners have holed out, or one partner has holed out and the other cannot better the side's score.
  • Stableford, Par/ Bogey, and Maximum Score - When the player has holed out, or has picked up after scoring zero points, losing the hole or reaching the maximum score.
5.5c
Entraînement quand le jeu est suspendu ou autrement interrompu
5.5c/1
Extra Practice Permissions No Longer Apply When Stroke-Play Round Resumed

In stroke play, when play is resumed by the Committee after it had been suspended, all players who had started their rounds prior to the suspension have resumed the play of their round. Consequently, those players are no longer allowed to practise other than as allowed by Rule 5.5b (Restriction on Practice Strokes Between Two Holes).

For example, if the Committee suspends play for the day and play will resume at 8:00 am on the following day, a player whose group will be the third group to play from a particular teeing area is not allowed to continue practising on the designated practice area after play has resumed at 8:00 am.

The player's round has resumed, even though players in his or her group will not be able to make their next strokes right away. The only practice that is allowed is putting or chipping on or near the putting green of the hole last competed, any practice putting green, or the teeing area of the next hole.

5.6
Retard déraisonnable ; cadence de jeu rapide
5.6a
Retarder le jeu de manière déraisonnable
5.6a/1
Examples of Delays That Are Considered Reasonable or Unreasonable

Unreasonable delays in the context of Rule 5.6a are delays caused by a player's actions that are within the player's control and affect other players or delay the competition. Brief delays that are a result of normal events that happen during a round or are outside the player's control are generally treated as "reasonable".

Determining which actions are reasonable or unreasonable depends on all the circumstances, including whether the player is waiting for other players in the group or the group ahead.

Examples of actions that are likely to be treated as reasonable are:

  • Briefly stopping by the clubhouse or half-way house to get food or drink.
  • Taking time to consult with others in the playing group to decide whether to play out the hole when there is a normal suspension by the Committee (Rule 5.7b(2)).

Examples of actions that, if causing more than a brief delay in play, are likely to be treated as unreasonable delay are:

  • Returning to the teeing area from the putting green to retrieve a lost club.
  • Continuing to search for a lost ball for several minutes after the allowed three-minute search time has expired.
  • Stopping by the clubhouse or half-way house to get food or drink for more than a few minutes if the Committee has not allowed for it.
5.6a/2
Player Who Gets Sudden Illness or Injury Is Normally Allowed 15 Minutes to Recover

If a player gets a sudden illness or injury (such as from heat exhaustion, a bee sting or being struck by a golf ball), the Committee should normally allow that player up to 15 minutes to recover before the player's failure to continue play would be unreasonably delaying play.

The Committee should also normally apply this same time limit to the total time a player uses when he or she receives repeated treatments during a round to alleviate an injury.

5.7
Interruption de jeu ; reprise du jeu
5.7a
Possibilité ou obligation pour les joueurs d'interrompre le jeu
5.7a/1
When a Player Has Stopped Play

Stopping play in the context of Rule 5.7a can either be an intentional act by the player or it can be a delay long enough to constitute stopping. Temporary delays, whether reasonable or unreasonable, are covered by Rule 5.6a (Unreasonable Delay).

Examples where the Committee is likely to disqualify a player under Rule 5.7a for stopping play include when:

  • The player walks off the course in frustration with no intent to return.
  • The player stops in the clubhouse after nine holes for an extended time to watch television or to have lunch when the Committee has not allowed for this.
  • The player takes shelter from rain for a significant amount of time.
5.7b
Ce que doivent faire les joueurs quand le Comité interrompt le jeu
5.7b(1)/1
Circumstances That Justify a Player’s Failure to Stop Play

Under Rule 5.7b(1), if the Committee declares an immediate suspension of play, all players must stop play at once. The intent of this suspension is to enable the course to be cleared as quickly as possible when a potentially dangerous situation, such as lightning, exists.

However, there can be confusion or uncertainty when a suspension is declared and there can be circumstances that explain or justify why the player didn't stop at once. In these cases, the Exception to Rule 5.7b allows the Committee to decide that there is no breach of the Rule.

If a player makes a stroke after play has been suspended, the Committee must consider all relevant facts in determining if the player should be disqualified.

Examples where the Committee is likely to determine that continuing play after suspension is justified include when a player:

  • Is in a remote part of the course and does not hear the signal for suspension of play, or confuses the signal for something else, such as a vehicle horn.
  • Has already taken a stance with a club behind the ball or has begun the backswing for a stroke and completes the stroke without hesitation.

An example where the Committee is likely to determine that continuing play after suspension is not justified is when a player hears the signal to suspend play but wants to make a stroke quickly prior to stopping, such as to complete a hole with a short putt or to take advantage of a favourable wind.

5.7b/1
Dropping a Ball After Play Has Been Suspended Is Not Failing to Stop Play

Stopping play in the context of Rule 5.7b means making no further strokes. Therefore, if, after a suspension of play, a player proceeds under a Rule, such as by dropping a ball, determining the nearest point of complete relief or continuing a search, there is no penalty.

However, if the Committee has signalled an immediate suspension, in view of the purpose of Rule 5.7b(1), it is recommended that all players take shelter immediately without taking further actions.

5.7c
Ce que doivent faire les joueurs quand le jeu reprend
5.7c/1
Players Must Resume When Committee Concludes There Is No Danger from Lightning

The safety of players is paramount and Committees should not risk exposing players to danger. Rule 5.7a (When Players May or Must Stop Play) allows a player to stop play if he or she reasonably believes that there is danger from lightning. In this situation, if the player's belief is reasonable, the player is the final judge.

However, if the Committee has ordered a resumption of play after using all reasonable means to conclude that danger from lightning no longer exists, all players must resume play. If a player refuses because he or she believes there is still danger, the Committee may conclude that the player's belief is unreasonable and he or she may be disqualified under Rule 5.7c.

5.7d
Relever la balle quand le jeu est interrompu ; replacer et substituer une balle quand le jeu reprend
5.7d(1)/1
Whether Player Must Accept Improved or Worsened Lie in Bunker During a Suspension

When replacing a ball in resuming play, Rule 14.2d (Where to Replace Ball When Original Lie Altered) does not apply and the player is not required to re-create the original lie.

For example, a player's ball is embedded in a bunker when play is suspended. During the suspension of play the bunker is prepared by the maintenance staff and the surface of the sand is now smooth. The player must resume play by placing a ball on the estimated spot from which the ball was lifted, even though this will be on the surface of the sand and not embedded.

However, if the bunker has not been prepared by the maintenance staff, the player is not necessarily entitled to the conditions affecting the stroke he or she had before play was stopped. If the conditions affecting the stroke are worsened by natural forces (such as wind or water), the player must not improve those worsened conditions (Rule 8.1d).

5.7d(1)/2
Removal of Loose Impediments Before Replacing Ball When Play is Resumed

The player must not remove a loose impediment before replacing a ball that, if removed when the ball was at rest, would have been likely to cause the ball to move (Exception 1 to Rule 15.1a). However, when resuming play, if a loose impediment is now present that was not there when the ball was lifted, that loose impediment may be removed before the ball is replaced.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Match Play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp joue directement contre un adversaire ou un camp adverse dans un match en tête-à-tête, sur un ou plusieurs tours :

  • Un joueur ou un camp gagne un trou dans le match en finissant le trou avec le plus petit nombre de coups (à savoir les coups joués et les coups de pénalité), et
  • Le match est gagné lorsqu'un joueur ou un camp mène l'adversaire ou le camp adverse par plus de trous qu'il n'en reste à jouer.

Un match play peut être joué comme un match en simple (dans lequel un joueur joue directement contre un adversaire), un match à Trois balles ou bien un match en Foursome ou à Quatre balles entre des camps de deux partenaires.

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Match Play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp joue directement contre un adversaire ou un camp adverse dans un match en tête-à-tête, sur un ou plusieurs tours :

  • Un joueur ou un camp gagne un trou dans le match en finissant le trou avec le plus petit nombre de coups (à savoir les coups joués et les coups de pénalité), et
  • Le match est gagné lorsqu'un joueur ou un camp mène l'adversaire ou le camp adverse par plus de trous qu'il n'en reste à jouer.

Un match play peut être joué comme un match en simple (dans lequel un joueur joue directement contre un adversaire), un match à Trois balles ou bien un match en Foursome ou à Quatre balles entre des camps de deux partenaires.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Pénalité générale

Perte du trou en match play ou deux coups de pénalité en stroke play.

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Equipement

Tout ce qui est utilisé, porté, tenu ou transporté par vous-même ou votre cadet.

Les objets utilisés pour le soin du parcours, tels que les râteaux, sont de l'équipement uniquement s'ils sont tenus ou transportés par vous-même ou votre cadet.

 

Interpretation Equipment/1 - Status of Items Carried by Someone Else for the Player

Items, other than clubs, that are carried by someone other than a player or his or her caddie are outside influences, even if they belong to the player. However, they are the player's equipment when in the player's or his or her caddie's possession.

For example, if a player asks a spectator to carry his or her umbrella, the umbrella is an outside influence while in the spectator's possession. However, if the spectator hands the umbrella to the player, it is now his or her equipment.

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Adversaire

La personne contre qui un autre joueur concourt dans un match. Le terme adversaire s'applique uniquement en match play.

Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Tee

Objet utilisé pour surélever une balle au-dessus du sol pour jouer depuis la zone de départ. Il ne doit pas dépasser 101,6 mm (4 pouces) de longueur et doit être conforme aux Règles sur l'Équipement.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Partenaire

Un joueur qui concourt avec un autre joueur en tant que camp, soit en match play, soit en stroke play.

Camp

Deux ou plusieurs partenaires concourant comme une entité lors d'un tour en match play ou en stroke play.

Chaque ensemble de partenaires est un camp, que chaque partenaire joue sa propre balle (Quatre balles) ou que les partenaires jouent une seule balle (Foursome).

Un camp n'est pas la même chose qu'une équipe. Dans une compétition par équipes, chaque équipe se compose de joueurs qui concourent en individuels ou en camps.

Match Play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp joue directement contre un adversaire ou un camp adverse dans un match en tête-à-tête, sur un ou plusieurs tours :

  • Un joueur ou un camp gagne un trou dans le match en finissant le trou avec le plus petit nombre de coups (à savoir les coups joués et les coups de pénalité), et
  • Le match est gagné lorsqu'un joueur ou un camp mène l'adversaire ou le camp adverse par plus de trous qu'il n'en reste à jouer.

Un match play peut être joué comme un match en simple (dans lequel un joueur joue directement contre un adversaire), un match à Trois balles ou bien un match en Foursome ou à Quatre balles entre des camps de deux partenaires.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Foursome (également connu sous l'appellation “Coups alternés“)

Une forme de jeu dans laquelle deux partenaires concourent en tant que camp en jouant alternativement une balle sur chaque trou.

Le Foursome peut être joué en match play, entre un camp de deux partenaires et un autre camp de deux partenaires, ou en stroke play entre de nombreux camps de deux partenaires.

Camp

Deux ou plusieurs partenaires concourant comme une entité lors d'un tour en match play ou en stroke play.

Chaque ensemble de partenaires est un camp, que chaque partenaire joue sa propre balle (Quatre balles) ou que les partenaires jouent une seule balle (Foursome).

Un camp n'est pas la même chose qu'une équipe. Dans une compétition par équipes, chaque équipe se compose de joueurs qui concourent en individuels ou en camps.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Quatre balles

Une forme de jeu dans laquelle concourent des camps de deux partenaires, chaque joueur jouant sa propre balle. Le score du camp sur un trou est le score le plus bas des deux partenaires sur ce trou.

Un Quatre balles peut être joué en match play, entre un camp de deux partenaires et un autre camp de deux partenaires, ou en stroke play entre de nombreux camps de deux partenaires.

Partenaire

Un joueur qui concourt avec un autre joueur en tant que camp, soit en match play, soit en stroke play.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Foursome (également connu sous l'appellation “Coups alternés“)

Une forme de jeu dans laquelle deux partenaires concourent en tant que camp en jouant alternativement une balle sur chaque trou.

Le Foursome peut être joué en match play, entre un camp de deux partenaires et un autre camp de deux partenaires, ou en stroke play entre de nombreux camps de deux partenaires.

Camp

Deux ou plusieurs partenaires concourant comme une entité lors d'un tour en match play ou en stroke play.

Chaque ensemble de partenaires est un camp, que chaque partenaire joue sa propre balle (Quatre balles) ou que les partenaires jouent une seule balle (Foursome).

Un camp n'est pas la même chose qu'une équipe. Dans une compétition par équipes, chaque équipe se compose de joueurs qui concourent en individuels ou en camps.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Quatre balles

Une forme de jeu dans laquelle concourent des camps de deux partenaires, chaque joueur jouant sa propre balle. Le score du camp sur un trou est le score le plus bas des deux partenaires sur ce trou.

Un Quatre balles peut être joué en match play, entre un camp de deux partenaires et un autre camp de deux partenaires, ou en stroke play entre de nombreux camps de deux partenaires.

Partenaire

Un joueur qui concourt avec un autre joueur en tant que camp, soit en match play, soit en stroke play.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Camp

Deux ou plusieurs partenaires concourant comme une entité lors d'un tour en match play ou en stroke play.

Chaque ensemble de partenaires est un camp, que chaque partenaire joue sa propre balle (Quatre balles) ou que les partenaires jouent une seule balle (Foursome).

Un camp n'est pas la même chose qu'une équipe. Dans une compétition par équipes, chaque équipe se compose de joueurs qui concourent en individuels ou en camps.

Stableford

Forme de stroke play dans laquelle :

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un trou est basé sur des points obtenus en comparant le nombre de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) du joueur ou du camp sur le trou à un score de référence pour le trou établi par le Comité.
  • La compétition est gagnée par le joueur ou le camp qui termine l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le plus de points.
Par/Bogey

Forme de stroke play qui utilise la même façon de compter le score qu'en match play :

  • Un joueur ou un camp gagne ou perd un trou en finissant le trou en moins de coups ou plus de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) qu'un score de référence établi pour ce trou par le Comité, et
  • La compétition est gagnée par le joueur ou le camp ayant le plus grand nombre de trous gagnés par rapport aux trous perdus (c'est-à-dire en additionnant les trous gagnés et soustrayant les trous perdus).
Score maximum

Forme de stroke play dans laquelle le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un trou est plafonné à un nombre maximal de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité), fixé par le Comité, tel que deux fois le par, un nombre fixe ou le double bogey en net.

Entrée (balle)

Quand une balle est au repos dans le trou à la suite d'un coup et que la totalité de la balle est au-dessous de la surface du green.

Quand les Règles font référence à “terminer le trou“, cela signifie que la balle du joueur est entrée.

Pour le cas spécial d'une balle reposant contre le drapeau dans le trou, voir la Règle 13.2c (la balle est considérée comme entrée si une partie quelconque de la balle est en dessous de la surface du green).

 

Interpretation Holed/1 - All of the Ball Must Be Below the Surface to Be Holed When Embedded in Side of Hole

When a ball is embedded in the side of the hole, and all of the ball is not below the surface of the putting green, the ball is not holed. This is the case even if the ball touches the flagstick.

Interpretation Holed/2 - Ball Is Considered Holed Even Though It Is Not “At Rest“

The words “at rest“ in the definition of holed are used to make it clear that if a ball falls into the hole and bounces out, it is not holed.

However, if a player removes a ball from the hole that is still moving (such as circling or bouncing in the bottom of the hole), it is considered holed despite the ball not having come to rest in the hole.

Stroke play

Forme de jeu dans laquelle un joueur ou un camp concourt contre tous les autres joueurs ou camps dans la compétition.

In the regular form of stroke play (see Rule 3.3):

  • Le score d'un joueur ou d'un camp pour un tour est le nombre total de coups (à savoir les coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité) nécessaires pour terminer le trou sur chaque trou, et
  • Le vainqueur est le joueur ou le camp qui finit l'ensemble des tours de la compétition avec le nombre le plus faible de coups.

D'autres formes de stroke play  avec des méthodes différentes de calcul sont le Stableford, le Score maximum et le Par / Bogey (voir Règle 21).

Toutes les formes de stroke play peuvent être jouées soit dans des compétitions individuelles (chaque joueur concourant pour son propre compte), soit dans des compétitions impliquant des camps de partenaires (Foursome ou Quatre balles).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Zone de départ

La zone d'où le joueur doit jouer pour commencer le trou qu'il joue.

La zone de départ est une zone rectangulaire d'une profondeur de deux longueurs de club où :

  • La lisière avant est définie par la ligne entre les points les plus en avant des deux marques de départ positionnées par le Comité, et
  • Les lisières latérales sont définies par les lignes vers l'arrière à partir des points extérieurs des marques de départ.

La zone de départ est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Tous les autres emplacements de départ sur le parcours (que ce soit sur le même trou ou sur un autre trou) font partie de la zone générale.

Green

La zone sur le trou que le joueur joue :

  • Qui est spécialement préparée pour le putting, ou
  • Que le Comité a définie comme étant le green (par ex. lorsqu'un green temporaire est utilisé).

Le green d'un trou comprend le trou dans lequel le joueur essaie d'entrer sa balle. Le green est l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies. Les greens de tous les autres trous (que le joueur n'est pas en train de jouer) sont des mauvais greens et font partie de la zone générale.

La lisière d'un green est définie par l'endroit où l'on peut voir que la zone spécialement préparée commence (par ex. où l'herbe a été coupée distinctement pour montrer la lisière), sauf si le Comité définit la lisière d'une manière différente (par ex. en utilisant une ligne ou des points).

Si un double green est utilisé pour deux trous différents :

  • La totalité de la zone préparée contenant les deux trous est considérée être le green lors du jeu de chaque trou.

Mais le Comité peut définir une lisière qui divise le double green en deux greens différents, de sorte que lorsqu'un joueur joue l'un des trous, la partie du double green utilisée pour l'autre trou est un mauvais green.

Perdue (balle)

Statut d'une balle qui n'est pas retrouvée dans les trois minutes après que le joueur ou son cadet (ou son partenaire ou le cadet de son partenaire) commencent à la rechercher.

Si la recherche commence et est temporairement interrompue pour une raison valable (par ex. quand le joueur arrête de rechercher lorsque le jeu est interrompu, ou quand il doit se tenir à l'écart pour attendre qu'un autre joueur joue) ou quand le joueur a identifié une mauvaise balle par erreur :

  • Le temps compris entre l'interruption et le moment où la recherche reprend ne compte pas, et
  • Le temps alloué pour la recherche est de trois minutes au total, en comptant à la fois le temps de recherche avant l'interruption et après la reprise de la recherche.

 

Interpretation Lost/1 - Ball May Not Be Declared Lost

A player may not make a ball lost by a declaration. A ball is lost only when it has not been found within three minutes after the player or his or her caddie or partner begins to search for it.

For example, a player searches for his or her ball for two minutes, declares it lost and walks back to play another ball. Before the player puts another ball in play, the original ball is found within the three-minute search time. Since the player may not declare his or her ball lost, the original ball remains in play.

Interpretation Lost/2 - Player May Not Delay the Start of Search to Gain an Advantage

The three-minute search time for a ball starts when the player or his or her caddie (or the player's partner or partner's caddie) starts to search for it. The player may not delay the start of the search in order to gain an advantage by allowing other people to search on his or her behalf.

For example, if a player is walking towards his or her ball and spectators are already looking for the ball, the player cannot deliberately delay getting to the area to keep the three-minute search time from starting. In such circumstances, the search time starts when the player would have been in a position to search had he or she not deliberately delayed getting to the area.

Interpretation Lost/3 - Search Time Continues When Player Returns to Play a Provisional Ball

If a player has started to search for his or her ball and is returning to the spot of the previous stroke to play a provisional ball, the three-minute search time continues whether or not anyone continues to search for the player's ball.

Interpretation Lost/4 - Search Time When Searching for Two Balls

When a player has played two balls (such as the ball in play and a provisional ball) and is searching for both, whether the player is allowed two separate three-minute search times depends how close the balls are to each other.

If the balls are in the same area where they can be searched for at the same time, the player is allowed only three minutes to search for both balls. However, if the balls are in different areas (such as opposite sides of the fairway) the player is allowed a three-minute search time for each ball.

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Tour

18 trous, ou moins, joués dans l'ordre établi par le Comité

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Parcours

Toute la zone de jeu à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites fixées par le Comité :

  • Toutes les zones à l'intérieur de la lisière des limites sont dans les limites et font partie du parcours.
  • Toutes les zones à l'extérieur de la lisière des limites sont hors limites et ne font pas partie du parcours.
  • La lisière des limites s'étend à la fois vers le haut au-dessus du sol et vers le bas au-dessous du sol.

Le parcours est constitué des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Coup

Le mouvement vers l'avant du club fait pour frapper la balle.

Mais un coup n'a pas été joué si un joueur :

  • Décide pendant la descente du club de ne pas frapper la balle et évite de le faire en arrêtant délibérément la tête du club avant qu'elle n'atteigne la balle ou, s'il est incapable de l'arrêter, en manquant délibérément la balle.
  • Frappe accidentellement la balle en faisant un swing d'entraînement ou en se préparant à jouer un coup

Lorsque les Règles font référence à "jouer une balle", cela signifie la même chose que jouer un coup.

Le score du joueur pour un trou ou un tour correspond à un nombre de "coups" ou de "coups réalisés", obtenu en additionnant le nombre de coups joués et tous les coups de pénalité (voir Règle 3.1c).

 

Interpretation Stroke/1 - Determining If a Stroke Was Made

If a player starts the downswing with a club intending to strike the ball, his or her action counts as a stroke when:

  • The clubhead is deflected or stopped by an outside influence (such as the branch of a tree) whether or not the ball is struck.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, whether or not the ball is struck with the shaft.
  • The clubhead separates from the shaft during the downswing and the player continues the downswing with the shaft alone, with the clubhead falling and striking the ball.

The player's action does not count as a stroke in each of following situations:

  • During the downswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player stops the downswing short of the ball, but the clubhead falls and strikes and moves the ball.
  • During the backswing, a player's clubhead separates from the shaft. The player completes the downswing with the shaft but does not strike the ball.
  • A ball is lodged in a tree branch beyond the reach of a club. If the player moves the ball by striking a lower part of the branch instead of the ball, Rule 9.4 (Ball Lifted or Moved by Player) applies.
Dropper

Tenir la balle et la lâcher de telle sorte qu'elle tombe dans l'air, avec l'intention de mettre la balle en jeu.

Si un joueur lâche une balle sans intention de la mettre en jeu, la balle n'a pas été droppée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque Règle de dégagement identifie une zone de dégagement spécifique où la balle doit être droppée et venir reposer.

En se dégageant, le joueur doit lâcher la balle à hauteur de genou de telle sorte que la balle :

  • Tombe verticalement, sans que le joueur la lance, lui donne de l'effet ou la fasse rouler ou lui imprime tout autre mouvement qui pourrait influer sur l'endroit où la balle viendra reposer, et
  • Ne touche pas une partie quelconque du corps du joueur ni son équipement avant qu'elle ne frappe le sol (voir Règle 14.3b).
Point le plus proche de dégagement complet

C'est le point de référence pour se dégager gratuitement d'une condition anormale du parcours (Règle 16.1), d'une situation dangereuse due à un animal (Règle 16.2), d'un mauvais green (Règle 13.1f) ou d'une zone de jeu interdit (Règles 16.1f et 17.1e), ou en se dégageant selon certaines Règles Locales.

C'est le point estimé où reposerait la balle qui est :

  • Le plus près de l'emplacement d'origine de la balle, mais pas plus près du trou que cet emplacement,
  • Dans la zone du parcours requise, et
  • Où la condition n'interfère pas avec le coup que le joueur aurait joué à l'emplacement d'origine de la balle si la condition n'existait pas.

L'estimation de ce point de référence nécessite que le joueur détermine le choix du club, le stance, le swing et la ligne de jeu qu'il aurait utilisés pour ce coup.

Le joueur n'a pas besoin de simuler ce coup en prenant réellement le stance et en exécutant le mouvement avec le club choisi (mais il est recommandé normalement que le joueur le fasse pour faciliter une estimation précise de ce point).

Le point le plus proche de dégagement complet se rapporte uniquement à la condition particulière pour laquelle le dégagement est pris et peut se situer à un endroit où il y a une interférence par quelque chose d'autre :

  • Si le joueur se dégage et que par la suite il a une interférence par une autre condition pour laquelle un dégagement est autorisé, le joueur peut de nouveau se dégager en déterminant un nouveau point le plus proche de dégagement complet pour la nouvelle condition.
  • Le dégagement doit être pris séparément pour chaque condition, sauf que le joueur peut prendre un dégagement des deux conditions en même temps (en déterminant le point le plus proche de dégagement complet des deux conditions) lorsque, ayant déjà pris un dégagement séparément pour chaque condition, il devient raisonnable de conclure que continuer à le faire entraînera une interférence permanente par l'une ou l'autre condition.

 

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/1 - Diagrams Illustrating Nearest Point of Complete Relief

In the diagrams, the term “nearest point of complete relief“ in Rule 16.1 (Abnormal Course Conditions) for relief from interference by ground under repair is illustrated in the case of both a right-handed and a left-handed player.

The nearest point of complete relief must be strictly interpreted. A player is not allowed to choose on which side of the ground under repair the ball will be dropped, unless there are two equidistant nearest points of complete relief. Even if one side of the ground under repair is fairway and the other is bushes, if the nearest point of complete relief is in the bushes, then that is the player's nearest point of complete relief.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/2 – Player Does Not Follow Recommended Procedure in Determining Nearest Point of Complete Relief

Although there is a recommended procedure for determining the nearest point of complete relief, the Rules do not require a player to determine this point when taking relief under a relevant Rule (such as when taking relief from an abnormal course condition under Rule 16.1b (Relief for Ball in General Area)). If a player does not determine a nearest point of complete relief accurately or identifies an incorrect nearest point of complete relief, the player only gets a penalty if this results in him or her dropping a ball into a relief area that does not satisfy the requirements of the Rule and the ball is then played.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/3 – Whether Player Has Taken Relief Incorrectly If Condition Still Interferes for Stroke with Club Not Used to Determine Nearest Point of Complete Relief

When a player is taking relief from an abnormal course condition, he or she is taking relief only for interference that he or she had with the club, stance, swing and line of play that would have been used to play the ball from that spot. After the player has taken relief and there is no longer interference for the stroke the player would have made, any further interference is a new situation.

For example, the player's ball lies in heavy rough in the general area approximately 230 yards from the green. The player selects a wedge to make the next stroke and finds that his or her stance touches a line defining an area of ground under repair. The player determines the nearest point of complete relief and drops a ball in the prescribed relief area according to Rule 14.3b(3) (Ball Must Be Dropped in Relief Area) and Rule 16.1 (Relief from Abnormal Course Conditions).

The ball rolls into a good lie within the relief area from where the player believes that the next stroke could be played with a 3-wood. If the player used a wedge for the next stroke there would be no interference from the ground under repair. However, using the 3-wood, the player again touches the line defining the ground under repair with his or her foot. This is a new situation and the player may play the ball as it lies or take relief for the new situation.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/4 - Player Determines Nearest Point of Complete Relief but Is Physically Unable to Make Intended Stroke

The purpose of determining the nearest point of complete relief is to find a reference point in a location that is as near as possible to where the interfering condition no longer interferes. In determining the nearest point of complete relief, the player is not guaranteed a good or playable lie.

For example, if a player is unable to make a stroke from what appears to be the required relief area as measured from the nearest point of complete relief because either the direction of play is blocked by a tree, or the player is unable to take the backswing for the intended stroke due to a bush, this does not change the fact that the identified point is the nearest point of complete relief.

After the ball is in play, the player must then decide what type of stroke he or she will make. This stroke, which includes the choice of club, may be different than the one that would have been made from the ball's original spot had the condition not been there.

If it is not physically possible to drop the ball in any part of the identified relief area, the player is not allowed relief from the condition.

Interpretation Nearest Point of Complete Relief/5 - Player Physically Unable to Determine Nearest Point of Complete Relief

If a player is physically unable to determine his or her nearest point of complete relief, it must be estimated, and the relief area is then based on the estimated point.

For example, in taking relief under Rule 16.1, a player is physically unable to determine the nearest point of complete relief because that point is within the trunk of a tree or a boundary fence prevents the player from adopting the required stance.

The player must estimate the nearest point of complete relief and drop a ball in the identified relief area.

If it is not physically possible to drop the ball in the identified relief area, the player is not allowed relief under Rule 16.1.

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Comité

La personne ou le groupe de personnes responsable de la compétition ou du parcours.

Voir Procédures pour le Comité, Section 1 (expliquant le rôle du Comité).

Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Lie

L'emplacement où une balle est au repos et tout élément naturel poussant ou fixé,toute obstruction inamovible, tout élément partie intégrante, ou tout élément de limites touchant la balle ou juste à côté.

Les détritus et les obstructions amovibles ne font pas partie du lie d'une balle.

Bunker

Une zone de sable spécialement préparée, qui est souvent un creux d'où le gazon ou la terre ont été enlevés.

Ne font pas partie d'un bunker :

  • Une lèvre, un mur ou une face, en lisière de la zone préparée, constitués de terre, d'herbe, de mottes de gazon empilées ou de matériaux artificiels,
  • La terre ou tout élément naturel qui pousse ou est fixé à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée (par ex. de l'herbe, des buissons ou des arbres),
  • Du sable qui a débordé ou qui se trouve à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée, et
  • Toutes les autres zones de sable sur le parcours qui ne sont pas à l'intérieur de la lisière d'une zone préparée (comme les déserts et autres zones de sable naturelles ou des zones parfois appelées “waste areas“).

Les bunkers sont l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Un Comité peut définir une zone de sable préparée comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker) ou une zone de sable non préparée comme un bunker.

Quand un bunker est en réparation, le Comité peut définir la totalité du bunker comme un terrain en réparation. Il est alors traité comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker).

Le mot “sable“ utilisé dans cette Définition et dans la Règle 12 comprend tout matériau semblable au sable utilisé comme matériau de bunker (comme les coquillages broyés), ainsi que toute terre mélangée au sable.

Bunker

Une zone de sable spécialement préparée, qui est souvent un creux d'où le gazon ou la terre ont été enlevés.

Ne font pas partie d'un bunker :

  • Une lèvre, un mur ou une face, en lisière de la zone préparée, constitués de terre, d'herbe, de mottes de gazon empilées ou de matériaux artificiels,
  • La terre ou tout élément naturel qui pousse ou est fixé à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée (par ex. de l'herbe, des buissons ou des arbres),
  • Du sable qui a débordé ou qui se trouve à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée, et
  • Toutes les autres zones de sable sur le parcours qui ne sont pas à l'intérieur de la lisière d'une zone préparée (comme les déserts et autres zones de sable naturelles ou des zones parfois appelées “waste areas“).

Les bunkers sont l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Un Comité peut définir une zone de sable préparée comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker) ou une zone de sable non préparée comme un bunker.

Quand un bunker est en réparation, le Comité peut définir la totalité du bunker comme un terrain en réparation. Il est alors traité comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker).

Le mot “sable“ utilisé dans cette Définition et dans la Règle 12 comprend tout matériau semblable au sable utilisé comme matériau de bunker (comme les coquillages broyés), ainsi que toute terre mélangée au sable.

Bunker

Une zone de sable spécialement préparée, qui est souvent un creux d'où le gazon ou la terre ont été enlevés.

Ne font pas partie d'un bunker :

  • Une lèvre, un mur ou une face, en lisière de la zone préparée, constitués de terre, d'herbe, de mottes de gazon empilées ou de matériaux artificiels,
  • La terre ou tout élément naturel qui pousse ou est fixé à l'intérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée (par ex. de l'herbe, des buissons ou des arbres),
  • Du sable qui a débordé ou qui se trouve à l'extérieur de la lisière de la zone préparée, et
  • Toutes les autres zones de sable sur le parcours qui ne sont pas à l'intérieur de la lisière d'une zone préparée (comme les déserts et autres zones de sable naturelles ou des zones parfois appelées “waste areas“).

Les bunkers sont l'une des cinq zones du parcours spécifiquement définies.

Un Comité peut définir une zone de sable préparée comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker) ou une zone de sable non préparée comme un bunker.

Quand un bunker est en réparation, le Comité peut définir la totalité du bunker comme un terrain en réparation. Il est alors traité comme une partie de la zone générale (ce qui signifie que ce n'est pas un bunker).

Le mot “sable“ utilisé dans cette Définition et dans la Règle 12 comprend tout matériau semblable au sable utilisé comme matériau de bunker (comme les coquillages broyés), ainsi que toute terre mélangée au sable.

Conditions affectant le coup

Le lie de la balle au repos du joueur, la zone de son stance intentionnel, la zone de son swing intentionnel, sa ligne de jeu et la zone de dégagement dans laquelle le joueur va dropper ou placer une balle.

  •  La “zone du stance intentionnel“ comprend à la fois l'endroit où le joueur placera ses pieds et toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la manière et l'endroit où le corps du joueur est positionné pour la préparation et le jeu du coup prévu.
  • La “zone du swing intentionnel“ comprend toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la montée ou la descente du club ou la fin du swing pour le coup prévu.
  • Chacun des termes lie, ligne de jeu et zone de dégagement possède sa propre définition.
Conditions affectant le coup

Le lie de la balle au repos du joueur, la zone de son stance intentionnel, la zone de son swing intentionnel, sa ligne de jeu et la zone de dégagement dans laquelle le joueur va dropper ou placer une balle.

  •  La “zone du stance intentionnel“ comprend à la fois l'endroit où le joueur placera ses pieds et toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la manière et l'endroit où le corps du joueur est positionné pour la préparation et le jeu du coup prévu.
  • La “zone du swing intentionnel“ comprend toute la zone qui pourrait raisonnablement affecter la montée ou la descente du club ou la fin du swing pour le coup prévu.
  • Chacun des termes lie, ligne de jeu et zone de dégagement possède sa propre définition.
Forces naturelles

Les effets de la nature tels que le vent, l'eau ou quand quelque chose se passe sans raison apparente du fait des effets de la gravité.

Améliorer

Modifier une ou plusieurs des conditions affectant le coup ou d'autres conditions physiques affectant le jeu de telle sorte que le joueur en tire un avantage potentiel pour le coup.

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.

Déplacée (balle)

Quand une balle au repos a quitté son emplacement d'origine et vient reposer à n'importe quel autre endroit, et que cela peut être vu à l'œil nu (peu importe que quelqu'un ait vu effectivement ou non ce déplacement).

Ceci s'applique que la balle se soit éloignée de son emplacement d'origine vers le haut, vers le bas ou horizontalement dans n'importe quelle direction.

Si la balle oscille seulement et reste sur ou revient à son emplacement d'origine, la balle ne s'est pas déplacée.

 

Interpretation Moved/1 - When Ball Resting on Object Has Moved

For the purpose of deciding whether a ball must be replaced or whether a player gets a penalty, a ball is treated as having moved only if it has moved in relation to a specific part of the larger condition or object it is resting on, unless the entire object the ball is resting on has moved in relation to the ground.

An example of when a ball has not moved includes when:

  • A ball is resting in the fork of a tree branch and the tree branch moves, but the ball's spot in the branch does not change.

Examples of when a ball has moved include when:

  • A ball is resting in a stationary plastic cup and the cup itself moves in relation to the ground because it is being blown by the wind.
  • A ball is resting in or on a stationary motorized cart that starts to move.

Interpretation Moved/2 - Television Evidence Shows Ball at Rest Changed Position but by Amount Not Reasonably Discernible to Naked Eye

When determining whether or not a ball at rest has moved, a player must make that judgment based on all the information reasonably available to him or her at the time, so that he or she can determine whether the ball must be replaced under the Rules. When the player's ball has left its original position and come to rest in another place by an amount that was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, a player's determination that the ball has not moved is conclusive, even if that determination is later shown to be incorrect through the use of sophisticated technology.

On the other hand, if the Committee determines, based on all of the evidence it has available, that the ball changed its position by an amount that was reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time, the ball will be determined to have moved even though no-one actually saw it move.

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Détritus

Tout élément naturel non attaché tel que :

  • Les pierres, herbes coupées, feuilles, branches et bâtons,
  • Les animaux morts et déchets d'animaux,
  • Les vers, insectes et animaux semblables qui peuvent être enlevés aisément, ainsi que les monticules ou les toiles qu'ils construisent (comme les rejets de vers et les fourmilières), et
  • Les mottes de terre compacte (y compris les carottes d'aération).

De tels éléments naturels ne sont pas détachés si :

  • ils poussent ou sont attachés
  • Ils sont solidement enfoncés dans le sol (c'est-à-dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas être enlevés aisément), ou
  • ils adhèrent à la balle

Cas spéciaux :

  • Le sable et la terre meuble ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La rosée, le givre et l'eau ne sont pas des détritus.
  • La neige et la glace naturelle (autre que le givre) sont au choix du joueur soit des détritus, soit, quand elles sont sur le sol, de l'eau temporaire.
  • Les toiles d'araignées sont des détritus même si elles sont attachées à un autre élément.

 

Interpretation Loose Impediment/1 - Status of Fruit

Fruit that is detached from its tree or bush is a loose impediment, even if the fruit is from a bush or tree not found on the course.

For example, fruit that has been partially eaten or cut into pieces, and the skin that has been peeled from a piece of fruit are loose impediments. But, when being carried by a player, it is his or her equipment.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/2 - When Loose Impediment Becomes Obstruction

Loose impediments may be transformed into obstructions through the processes of construction or manufacturing.

For example, a log (loose impediment) that has been split and had legs attached has been changed by construction into a bench (obstruction).

Interpretation Loose Impediment/3 - Status of Saliva

Saliva may be treated as either temporary water or a loose impediment, at the option of the player.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/4 - Loose Impediments Used to Surface a Road

Gravel is a loose impediment and a player may remove loose impediments under Rule 15.1a. This right is not affected by the fact that, when a road is covered with gravel, it becomes an artificially surfaced road, making it an immovable obstruction. The same principle applies to roads or paths constructed with stone, crushed shell, wood chips or the like.

In such a situation, the player may:

  • Play the ball as it lies on the obstruction and remove gravel (loose impediment) from the road (Rule 15.1a).
  • Take relief without penalty from the abnormal course condition (immovable obstruction) (Rule 16.1b).

The player may also remove some gravel from the road to determine the possibility of playing the ball as it lies before choosing to take free relief.

Interpretation Loose Impediment/5 - Living Insect Is Never Sticking to a Ball

Although dead insects may be considered to be sticking to a ball, living insects are never considered to be sticking to a ball, whether they are stationary or moving. Therefore, live insects on a ball are loose impediments.

Replacer

Placer une balle en la posant et la relâchant, avec l'intention qu'elle soit en jeu.

Si le joueur pose une balle sans intention qu'elle soit en jeu, la balle n'a pas été replacée et n'est pas en jeu (voir Règle 14.4).

Chaque fois qu'une Règle exige qu'une balle soit replacée, la Règle concernée identifie un emplacement spécifique où la balle doit être replacée.

 

Interpretation Replace/1 - Ball May Not Be Replaced with a Club

For a ball to be replaced in a right way, it must be set down and let go. This means the player must use his or her hand to put the ball back in play on the spot it was lifted or moved from.

For example, if a player lifts his or her ball from the putting green and sets it aside, the player must not replace the ball by rolling it to the required spot with a club. If he or she does so, the ball is not replaced in the right way and the player gets one penalty stroke under Rule 14.2b(2) (How Ball Must Be Replaced) if the mistake is not corrected before the stroke is made.